The Penhaligon's Times https://www.penhaligons.com Fri, 22 Sept 2017 00:00:00 GMT https://www.penhaligons.com en hourly 1 Mr. Harrod https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mr-harrod/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mr-harrod/#comments Thurs, 21 Sept 2017 00:00:00 GMT Tom Rasmussen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mr-harrod/ <br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_554.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;"><strong>Mr. Harrod</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve never been one to pussy-foot around a topic. I&rsquo;ve always been&nbsp;<em>very</em>&nbsp;good at what I do. And while being gentlemanly is incredibly important to many of my clients &ndash; the Royals included &ndash; people much appreciate the honest opinion of a true master.&rdquo; Mr. Harrod is society&rsquo;s finest tea merchant and, he&rsquo;s certainly not ashamed to say, the very best greengrocer in the business.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &ldquo;You might snigger. But in these circles, having the right produce and sundries on your table is tantamount to good manners, or the size of one&rsquo;s estate. Serving the perfect cup to your guests can make you the toast of the town. A bad one can change a person&rsquo;s social standing in a matter of minutes.&rdquo; And he&rsquo;s right: if anyone remembers Lady Loretta, it&rsquo;s only because of her lackluster Oolong<br /> &nbsp;<br /> When he&rsquo;s not busy ensuring his illustrious customers are incomparably well looked after, this proudly self-made gentleman is revered for his snapping wit and his incomparable ability with women of all kinds. There&rsquo;s nothing blue blooded ladies crave more than a man who knows his way around a pantry. &ldquo;Indeed I&rsquo;ve been at the centre of many scandals. They&rsquo;re exhilarating while you&rsquo;re in the eye of the storm, but the eye swiftly moves to the next scandal within a couple of days. What can I say? I can&rsquo;t resist most women &ndash; single or married &ndash; and they can&rsquo;t resist me.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Although Harrod has collected an arsenal of enemies along the way, he also has a great many fans. And what&rsquo;s a life without controversy? However controversial, Mr. Harrod is the most trusted&nbsp;retailer in town, and many of his enemies return invariably for his uncompromising standards, and the incomparable confidence&nbsp;that comes with the knowledge that Mr. Harrod stocks your pantry&hellip; no matter what he did to your wife.</span></span> 0 Dandies and Devils https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/dandies-and-devils/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/dandies-and-devils/#comments Weds, 30 Aug 2017 00:00:00 GMT Benji Walters https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/dandies-and-devils/ Having been synonymous with masculine elegance for the past three hundred years, it’s no surprise that London’s Jermyn Street also happens to be the site of the original Penhaligon’s boutique. Having been synonymous with masculine elegance for the past three hundred years, it’s no surprise that London’s Jermyn Street also happens to be the site of the original Penhaligon’s boutique.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_542.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Having been synonymous with masculine elegance for the past three hundred years, it&rsquo;s no surprise that London&rsquo;s Jermyn Street also happens to be the site of the original Penhaligon&rsquo;s boutique. Our founder, William Penhaligon, first opened our doors back in 1870 and we&rsquo;ve been proud to call the iconic thoroughfare home ever since. But we&rsquo;re not the only ones. A whole host of fops, artists, dandies and originators have flocked to this soign&eacute; corner of St James&rsquo;s over the years, inviting both fame and notoriety in equal measure. Take the path less trodden with us as we stroll through the secret eccentricities of the capital&rsquo;s most rakish street.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>William Plunkett&nbsp;</strong><br /> Along with his partner in crime James MacLaine, roguish highwayman William Plunkett terrorised Hyde Park in the mid-1700s, relieving victims as esteemed as Horace Walpole of their finery, money and pride. A gentleman crook through and through, Plunkett concealed his face behind intricate Venetian masks, moonlighted as an apothecary, and was never anything less than courteous during his stick ups. Naturally, a spacious Jermyn Street&nbsp;apartment was his bolthole of choice.<br /> <br /> <strong>Sutherland Macdonald&nbsp;</strong><br /> You&rsquo;d be forgiven if it&rsquo;s shirt collars and cuffs, not inked sleeves, that spring to mind when you think of Jermyn Street. But Sutherland Macdonald, one of Britain&rsquo;s earliest professional tattoo artist and the first with identifiable premises open to the public, set up shop in the late 1900s at none other than No. 76 Jermyn Street. Rather like the original Penhaligon&rsquo;s, the tattoo parlour was conveniently located above a Turkish Hamam bathhouse (in which Macdonald himself had a stake). Unexpected as it was, the salon was an important hub for the late Victorian period&rsquo;s surprising tattoo craze.<br /> <br /> <strong>Oscar Wilde</strong><br /> Dousing his literature with the same gilded beauty as his meticulously fashioned outfits, Oscar Wilde is perhaps the quintessential literary fop and, of course, a Jermyn Street icon. A frequent visitor to the barber in our original boutique, Wilde also favoured the street for its bachelor chambers, which proved an ideal space for writing and entertaining as well as leading the gay double life that would eventually bring about his sad demise. Indeed, beneath Jermyn Street&rsquo;s upright reputation lies a rich queer history that includes figures like Wilde&rsquo;s friend George Ives &ndash; an early campaigner for homosexual law reform.</span></span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Covent Garden & Iris Prima https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-covent-garden-iris-prima/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-covent-garden-iris-prima/#comments Thurs, 03 Aug 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-covent-garden-iris-prima/ As happy tourists stand on the cobbles admiring street entertainers, it is difficult to appreciate that Covent Garden ‘twas never always thus! As happy tourists stand on the cobbles admiring street entertainers, it is difficult to appreciate that Covent Garden ‘twas never always thus!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_525.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Covent Garden is the friendly side of London, welcoming visitors with its easy-going nature and charm. After all the grandeur that Westminster has to offer, the impressive stone forum, cobbles and the allure of boutiques and restaurants give sightseers a taste of a different London; an area that is full of life and energy. As happy tourists stand on the cobbles admiring street entertainers, it is difficult to appreciate that Covent Garden &lsquo;twas never always thus!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The area is old. This is Lundenwic or London&rsquo;s market, a place of trade created by the Saxons in the 6<sup>th</sup> century. It then became a fruit and vegetable garden for the Benedictine monks of St Peter&rsquo;s Abbey, Westminster. It is apt that a fruit and flower market stood on this site from the mid 1600&rsquo;s until the 1970&rsquo;s. Its most famous resident is undoubtedly flower girl, Eliza Doolittle in My Fair Lady. The film gives a rather anodyne, cinematic view of Edwardian London. In reality, Covent Garden of the 19<sup>th</sup> and early 20<sup>th</sup> centuries was a meeting point of incongruities; it boasted beauty and danger, wealth and destitution, toil and ultimate leisure. The vestiges of a working market can still be seen but thankfully, most traces of darker times have long gone. The market and The Royal Opera House, Covent Garden seem unlikely bedfellows but they have rubbed along, just a street apart, for many years. Within the Royal Opera House, there is another little surprise &ndash; the Royal Ballet.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In honour of the proximity of Penhaligon&rsquo;s, Wellington Street and the nearby ballet school, Penhaligon&rsquo;s created a new fragrance, Iris Prima in 2013. This was a collaboration of dancers from The English National Ballet and perfumers working together to capture the essence of this classical dance. Just as ballet tells a story through dance and movement, fragrance can bring the tale alive through releasing memories and adding new olfactory storylines.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Iris Prima jet&eacute;s on to the stage with zesty bergamot and is immediately tempered and calmed by the tenderness and strength of amber. Little flashes of pink pepper, reminiscent of a ballerina sur les pointes tiptoeing across the scene, announce the arrival of the prima ballerina for the main act. The heroine is iris, a nod to Covent Garden&rsquo;s floral past which can be seen in local street names, Floral Street and Rose Street. The powdery qualities of iris, like the talc used in the ballerina&rsquo;s shoes, meets Jasmine Sambac in a grand pas de deux. Two innovative molecules, Hedione and Paridisione add light reminiscent of old stage limelight as the fragrance lightens and glows. The work of the ballerinas is done and it is now the task of the master perfumer to bring the fragrance into the final act. The drama may be over but there is still life in the base. Musky leather of ballet slippers slips into the warm caress of sandalwood, vetiver and vanilla as the dancers retreat to rub their feet. The fragrance is over and the performance has been appreciated. As the imagined crowd disperses into the night, Covent Garden may be ready to go to sleep but its market is about to swing into action. As late night revellers and fanciers of &lsquo;flower-girls&rsquo; drift away, their sounds are replaced by shouts and clattering of the market traders. The day has started again although it never really stops.&nbsp;</span> 0 Little Known Blenheim - Bluebell Woods https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-bluebell-woods/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-bluebell-woods/#comments Fri, 28 Jul 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-bluebell-woods/ As soon as we see the arrival of bluebells, we know that spring is here; the dawning sun of summer is on the horizon! As soon as we see the arrival of bluebells, we know that spring is here; the dawning sun of summer is on the horizon!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_520.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">As soon as we see the arrival of bluebells, we know that spring is here; the dawning sun of summer is on the horizon! Bluebells start blooming in the South first in early April and can still be around in mid May as you progress further North.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Bluebells herald the lengthening of the days and the onset of warmer days. If their little bells could ring, they would be chiming in the arrival of positivity and growth. The Japanese have cherry blossom, New England has Fall and the English have bluebells. &nbsp;Kew Gardens recently stated that just under 50% of the world&rsquo;s bluebells are found in the UK. They are perfectly happy growing on the floors of woods and forests and are adapted to cover the woodland floor before other plants are even in leaf. &nbsp;There are legends and stories around the bluebell. Those who wear them are compelled to tell the truth and they are also considered a symbol of constancy. Many believe they were the original &lsquo;something blue&rsquo; for brides. There are many who also think that bluebells are linked with fairies. It is not hard to think how these legends and tales came about; there is something special, almost magical about a bluebell wood.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Blenheim estate is rich in bluebells; Blenheim&rsquo;s grounds are also home to the largest number of ancient oak trees in Europe. The woods and oaks date back to medieval times and beyond. One of the trees is estimated as being 1,050 years old. This habitat is perfect for the development and growth of bluebells. They thrive in the rich habitat provided by these ancient trees. A visit to Blenheim in the spring is a must.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Enjoying bluebells is like enjoying a fine wine. The best time to experience them is mid morning (not actually recommended for wine!) A little hint of mist or frost in the air adds to the ambience. Next take a long, languid look; as you gaze across the bluebells, you will notice that they really are not blue at all. They change from delphinium, deep sky, Persian blue to shades of blue-lilac. Then look at each little bell hanging delicately down, as if they are too shy to raise their heads and as you do this, drink in their aroma. The scent is green and fresh, a mix of dew and minerality and is distinctly floral. If this does not evoke childhood memories and wistfulness, you need to go and visit Blenheim and then take a wander over to the woods and spend as much time as you can to create new memories and a connection with nature at its best and most English.&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known Londoner - The Distiller https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoner-the-distiller/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoner-the-distiller/#comments Weds, 19 Jul 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoner-the-distiller/ We’ve met Emma from Coutours Walking tours and discovered her favourite haunts of London, now we move on to gin! We’ve met Emma from Coutours Walking tours and discovered her favourite haunts of London, now we move on to gin!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_529.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">We are now underway with our <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoners/"><u>Little Known Londoner</u></a> series. We&rsquo;ve met <u><a href="https://www.facebook.com/Penhaligons/photos/a.417416393947.193409.294708288947/10155504945263948/?type=3">Emma from Coutours Walking</a></u> tours and discovered her favourite haunts of London, now we move on to gin!<br /> <br /> In 2009 two childhood friends set up the first traditional copper distillery in London since 1820. Their mission was simple: to bring London Dry Gin of truly uncompromising quality and character, back to the city where it first earned its name.<br /> <br /> We&rsquo;ve been lucky enough to talk to one of the distillers. Might I be permitted to introduce you to Kit! Normally found tending to one of the copper ladies at Sipsmith Gin Distillery, she&rsquo;s a glass half full (of gin) person&hellip;</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Name:</strong> Kit Clancy<br /> <br /> <strong>Position:</strong> Distiller<br /> <br /> <strong>Company:</strong> Sipsmith London<br /> <br /> <strong>How did you get to the position you are currently holding?</strong><br /> <br /> I came into the spirits industry the long way around, starting off working with wine where I trained my palate and gained experience in production. After becoming inspired by Sam, Fairfax and Jared&rsquo;s mission to bring the distilling of gin back to London, I joined as a trainee under the mentorship of our Head Distiller Oliver Kitson.<br /> <br /> <strong>Would you change anything on this career journey?</strong><br /> <br /> Absolutely not! I&rsquo;ve met some incredible people along the way and my previous experiences provide me with constant inspiration for pioneering new flavours.<br /> <br /> <strong>How long have you held this position?</strong><br /> <br /> It&rsquo;s very nearly my two year anniversary at Sipsmith and I&rsquo;ll be sure to celebrate it with a martini or two!<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe a typical day? (if there is such a thing!)&nbsp;</strong><br /> <br /> I&rsquo;m responsible for the daily running of the distillery and ensuring that only gin of uncompromising quality makes it into our bottles. A typical day beginning by getting our three copper stills (Prudence, Patience and Constance) up and running, with the distillation process taking around 9 hours per batch, plus maceration time. The way we make our gin is very hands on and so we have built up a strong team of distillers to ensure someone is always on hand to tweak something during the process, if required. I also assist Oliver in creating new products and liaising with suppliers, for example discussing harvest reports for the next juniper crop.<br /> <br /> <strong>What are your average hours?&nbsp;</strong><br /> <br /> On average I work a 9 hour day but the time always flies! I&rsquo;m certainly not a clock watcher.<br /> <br /> <strong>What is the favourite part of your job?</strong><br /> <br /> This a hard one&hellip; The team at Sipsmith is very strong and I&rsquo;m feel very lucky to work with such an amazing group of people. I love to work creatively with my senses and distilling is the perfect balancing act of where science meets art.<br /> Being part of crafting the first gin to be distilled in London in nearly 200 years is also a great source of pride for me. There truly is never a dull moment!<br /> <br /> <strong>When is your busiest time of year?</strong><br /> <br /> Summer and the lead up to Christmas are the busiest times for the company and require all hands to be on deck. In the distillery we try to work one step ahead and are currently developing our gins for the Christmas edition of our gin subscription service, The Sipsmith Sipping Society, which feels quite odd when it&rsquo;s 30+ degrees outside!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Tell me something about your company that few people may know.</strong><br /> <br /> You can come and visit us and sample our gin in the very building in which it&rsquo;s made!&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <strong>What is the next exciting instalment?&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong><br /> <br /> There are always new and exciting gins being created in our Distillery Lab which people can get their hands on through our&nbsp;<u><a href="https://sipsmith.com/the-sipsmith-sipping-society/">Sipsmith Sipping Society</a></u>. Each quarter we bottle and release our favourite four recent experimental creations. A few of my favourites have included Bonfire Gin and Beekeeper Gin; the former is smoked with cherry wood, and the latter distilled with sage, orange blossom and infused with Bell Heather Honey from our friends at The London Honey Company.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>What do you do to relax in London?</strong><br /> <br /> In my free time I love to visit local farmers markets and cook with quality ingredients, an ethos which runs through from my background in wine making and distilling. I also love to get out and sip our gin in London&rsquo;s bars and restaurants.</span><br /> 0 Little Known Blenheim -The 9th Duke of Malborough https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-9th-duke-of-malborough/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-9th-duke-of-malborough/#comments Tues, 18 Jul 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-9th-duke-of-malborough/ If you wander into the grounds of the palace, there are only a few areas that are private and not accessible to the public. One such area is the Italian garden. If you wander into the grounds of the palace, there are only a few areas that are private and not accessible to the public. One such area is the Italian garden.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_518.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">If you wander into the grounds of the palace, there are only a few areas that are private and not accessible to the public. One such area is the Italian garden. While visitors can look at the order and the beauty of this space, they cannot actually walk through it. The Italian garden and the water terraces were created under the watchful eye of the 9<sup>th</sup> Duke of Blenheim, cousin and friend of Winston Churchill. In the centre of the garden is the mermaid fountain carved by American sculptor, Waldo Story. He also created the two white marble busts of the Duke and his first wife, Consuelo Vanderbilt.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The 9<sup>th</sup> Duke of Marlborough, Charles Richard John Spencer-Churchill (1871-1934) stands out as one of the most interesting incumbent of Blenheim Palace. He was hailed as the saviour of the both the palace and the family. In 1892 when he inherited the dukedom, the estate was on the verge of bankruptcy. He was determined to restore and renovate the palace as well as keep the family from financial ruin. He had the unenviable task of repairing a dilapidated pile with the hope of returning it to a stately home once more. There were few options at this time to raise funds, so for propriety&rsquo;s sake, he chose the route of over 300 peers at the end of the 19<sup>th</sup> Century and married a wealthy American. In November 1895, he married Consuelo Vanderbilt. For those of you who are only remotely aware of notable American families, you may well have heard of the name Vanderbilt. The family was one of the wealthiest in American having made their fortunes on the building of railroads across the country. Consuelo&rsquo;s mother was desperate for Consuelo to gain the title of Duchess - the ultimate cherry on the cake, giving the family an &lsquo;old money&rsquo; connection and improved social standing.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> There was no disguising the fact that this relationship was purely transactional and financial. Consuelo&rsquo;s dowry (worth approx. &pound;62m today) was immediately set to work to pay off inheritance dues, buy back family treasures that had been sold off and start rebuilding the home. The Duke had no intention of living anywhere but Blenheim so Consuelo was dragged to the UK and lived in near isolation in her new marital home. After many years of unhappiness, Consuelo did something unimaginable; she left her husband and filed for divorce in 1921. He was now free to remarry and in the same year married the beautiful and eccentric, Gladys Deacon. Gladys was also an American and a friend of Consuelo. It was Gladys who commissioned the &lsquo;eyes&rsquo; that look down at you as you enter the portico to the house from the Great Court. She is also immortalised in the two extraordinary sphinxes between the first and second water terraces.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Duke&rsquo;s marriages were not successful and although he never divorced Gladys, he forced her out of Blenheim and they lived apart until the duke died in 1934.&nbsp; Taking over the responsibility of the only non-royal, secular palace in Britain was an enormous job. We might not condone his methods but if it were not for the 9<sup>th</sup> Duke, there is little doubt there would be no palace for us to enjoy today.&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 William's London: Jermyn Street & St James's Street https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/williams-london-jermyn-street-st-jamess-street/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/williams-london-jermyn-street-st-jamess-street/#comments Fri, 14 Jul 2017 00:00:00 GMT Nick https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/williams-london-jermyn-street-st-jamess-street/ The street where the Penhaligon's story began has always been a destination for Gentlemen. The street where the Penhaligon's story began has always been a destination for Gentlemen.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_285.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The illustrious and historic centre for Gentlemen&#39;s shopping and grooming, tucked away just behind the bustling crowds of Piccadilly, Jermyn Street &amp; St James&#39;s Street in William&#39;s day were reserved for the elite and the dandy.<br /> Around the corner from historic department store Fortnum &amp; Mason, originally founded in 1707, and the timeless Burlington Arcade.<br /> <br /> Paxton &amp; Whitfield, England&#39;s oldest Cheesmongers, has been based on Jermyn Street since 1797. Like Penhaligon&#39;s, they served the Royal Court of Victoria, and currently hold a Royal Warrant from HRH the Prince of Wales.<br /> <br /> Bespoke shirt-makers and tailors aplenty can be found on Jermyn Street today. Turnbull &amp; Asser, who also currently supply HRH the Prince of Wales, were founded in 1885, whilst T.M. Lewin, famous for creating the front fastening shirt in 1905, was founded in 1898.<br /> <br /> Footwear has also been a longstanding feature of the area - John Lobb opened his boutique in 1866 on St James&#39;s, famed for supplying the Royal Palace and Queen Victoria herself.<br /> <br /> The Hammam Baths where William Penhaligon founded his Barbershop and created his first fragrance were highly exclusive, frequented by politicians, celebrities and royalty from around the world, with Turkish masseurs from Istanbul.<br /> <br /> Penhaligon&#39;s have maintained a presence in the area, with No. 66 Jermyn Street followed by No. 33 St James&#39;s Street, before moving a road away to 25 Bury Street and Old Bond Street. Our nearest store to the area is Burlington Arcade, a short stroll away. </span> 0 Little Known Londoners https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoners/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoners/#comments Thurs, 13 Jul 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-londoners/ Over the past year, Penhaligon’s Times has brought you a series of articles called “Little Known London”, a look at some of the more unusual, forgotten and hidden buildings and places that make London unique. Over the past year, Penhaligon’s Times has brought you a series of articles called “Little Known London”, a look at some of the more unusual, forgotten and hidden buildings and places that make London unique.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_526.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Over the past year, Penhaligon&rsquo;s Times has brought you a series of articles called &ldquo;Little Known London&rdquo;, a look at some of the more unusual, forgotten and hidden buildings and places that make London unique. For the next step, it seemed natural to look at the people behind London, those at the helm of interesting and unique businesses. Some of these are custodians of heritage who bear the responsibility of ensuring an ancient company is still relevant and viable in the crazy times in which we live. Others just serve London in the best way they can. Whilst some work behind the scenes, others are the not-so-public face of their company. Whether you have heard of them or know them by reputation, this series of blogs will give you a greater understanding of their role in London, their successes as well as the challenges that they face in this wonderful metropolis.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> We are exploring the lives of some of these people over the next few months to uncover who they are and what they do as well as find out what is special and interesting about them. Whether they run one of the most famous hotels in the world, own the oldest tea shop in London or are a seventh generation oysterman, we will tell their story and how their lives impact on our capital city.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The series is called &ldquo;Little Known Londoners&rdquo; - those at the heart of making London great. Each piece will concentrate on a subject who has been a unique contributor to London&rsquo;s history or is helping shape our future. In turbulent times, we are delighted to bring you some pillars of London&rsquo;s society.&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known Blenheim - The Palace https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-palace/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-palace/#comments Weds, 28 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-blenheim-the-palace/ The house is a never-ending line of magnificence; grandeur is an understatement. Every vista of the house is breathless The house is a never-ending line of magnificence; grandeur is an understatement. Every vista of the house is breathless<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_521.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">As you drive through Oxford, looping around its perimeter on the dull and endless ring road, it is not easy to imagine what lies beyond. A few more roundabouts later and you leave the outskirts of the university town. You are now in the country. This is not any old countryside, this is Oxfordshire; a county of chocolate box villages and rural charm. The approach to Blenheim is imminent once you see the impressive wall that demarks the great estate. The village of Woodstock acts as an amuse bouche, a little mouthful of English quaintness before the main course of the palace. As you enter the gates, Blenheim is laid out before you like a banquet of enormous proportions. This is like no other feast you have ever enjoyed. &ldquo;This is the finest view in England&rdquo; said a rather biased but totally accurate Lord Randolph Henry Spencer-Churchill (1849 &ndash;1895).<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The setting is mouth-watering and represents the English countryside at its best. Lancelot &ldquo;Capability&rdquo; Brown took much effort to create a natural park as if it was ever thus, however all of it was designed to within an inch of its life. The whimsical bridge, the Arthurian lake, the noble gatherings of beech and oak trees with the vast baize lawn help balance and enhance the palace gracefully.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The house is a never-ending line of magnificence; grandeur is an understatement. Every vista of the house is breathless &ndash; each Grinling Gibbons&rsquo;s carving, every dominating statue, each shimmering golden globe, clock and column creates a house of near perfection. However, it is the story of the house, the people who lived here, who were born here and their impact that makes this house more than the sum of its parts. We have to admire the vision of the 1<sup>st</sup> Duke of Marlborough (1650- 1722), who in 1705 commissioned the building of a palace to honour Queen Anne, the victory at Battle of Blindheim (Blenheim) and the shattering of the seemingly indomitable Louis XIV.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The 9<sup>th</sup> Duke (1871- 1934) had the unenviable task of taking on a palace that was in need of a lot of renovation. He married an American heiress and her dowry helped save one of the UK&rsquo;s most important houses and helped create what we see today. It seemed a shame that she was then replaced with the beautiful and beguiling Gladys who became the duke&rsquo;s second wife. One of the most fascinating and oft overlooked delights within the palace are several eyes looking down at you as you approach the portico in the Great Court. These were commissioned by Gladys and painted in 1928 by artist, Colin Gill. The duke&rsquo;s eyes were brown and hers blue and there are six of them staring down at you. Why six? Good question; no one is really sure.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Blenheim Palace was a special place to our most famous statesman, Winston Churchill. He was born here, in his grandfather&rsquo;s home, prematurely after a rather bumpy ride from London. He also proposed to his wife, Clementine and spent some of their honeymoon at the palace as well. It was so important to Churchill that he came to be laid to rest here in 1965 at the nearby St Martin&rsquo;s church in Bladon alongside his mother, father and brother, Jack.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The stories, the important additions and quirky details all help turn an imposing estate into a national treasure and a UNESCO World Heritage Site</span> 0 A Spot of Afternoon Tea? https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/blenheim-bouquet-afternoon-tea-at-blenheim-palace/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/blenheim-bouquet-afternoon-tea-at-blenheim-palace/#comments Tues, 27 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Charlotte https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/blenheim-bouquet-afternoon-tea-at-blenheim-palace/ Continuing the time honoured relationship between Penhaligon’s and Blenheim Palace, we have partnered to offer a champagne afternoon tea at The Orangery restaurant on the Blenheim Palace greounds. Continuing the time honoured relationship between Penhaligon’s and Blenheim Palace, we have partnered to offer a champagne afternoon tea at The Orangery restaurant on the Blenheim Palace greounds. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_default.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Continuing the time honoured relationship between Penhaligon&rsquo;s and Blenheim Palace, we have partnered to offer a champagne afternoon tea at The Orangery restaurant on the Blenheim Palace grounds.<br /> <br /> Treat your senses with fragrant pastries inspired by the lemon, lime and lavender notes in <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blenheim-bouquet-eau-de-toilette/"><u>Blenheim Bouquet</u></a>, and a complimentary&nbsp;sample of the distinguished scent, first created in 1902.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Blenheim Bouquet Afternoon Tea at Blenheim Palace" src=" /images/blogs/B_Palace_06-min.jpg" style="width: 620px; height: 413px;" /><br /> <a href="http://www.bookatable.co.uk/the-orangery-at-blenheim-palace-woodstock-oxfordshire?c=auto_restaurant&amp;q=the-orangery-at-blenheim-palace-woodstock-oxfordshire"><br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Bookings available from 1st-31st July, at &pound;30 per person.</span></a><br /> <u><span style="font-size: 12px;"><a href="http://www.bookatable.co.uk/the-orangery-at-blenheim-palace-woodstock-oxfordshire?c=auto_restaurant&amp;q=the-orangery-at-blenheim-palace-woodstock-oxfordshire">Book here</a></span></u></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Addicted to Tea https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/addicted-to-tea/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/addicted-to-tea/#comments Mon, 26 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/addicted-to-tea/ How did tea become our nation’s favourite drink, a drink by which we are defined and parodied abroad? How did tea become our nation’s favourite drink, a drink by which we are defined and parodied abroad?<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_512.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">How did tea become our nation&rsquo;s favourite drink, a drink by which we are defined and parodied abroad? We had been drinking small quantities of tea as a medicine and there is the briefest of mentions of tea by the great diarist, Samuel Pepys but it wasn&rsquo;t until the marriage of Charles II and Catherine of Braganza that tea became popular. Poor old Catherine; she took her first steps onto British soil after a rather unsettling sea voyage from Portugal to marry the King and was met with a tankard of beer. How uncouth she must have thought us! She immediately requested for her <em>chai</em> to be brought to her and without even realising, she had introduced the British to their national drink. In fact, a cup of char and charlady both come from the Chinese word for tea &ndash; chai.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Catherine&rsquo;s love of tea spread to the fashionable elite who loved the glamour and ceremony of tea. Ladies would join her in drinking the scalding Chinese elixir from charming handleless cups. These included the smoky Lapsang Souchon as well as various Pekoes, the tips of the youngest black tea plants. This certainly wasn&#39;t a cheap beverage and this new-found passion meant that we really needed to make friends with and trade with China to get our tea. The little tea that was coming into the country was incredibly expensive. Ladies, who had taken responsibility for the tea drinking habits of the household, used lockable tea caddies so that the servants didn&rsquo;t get a taste for the leaves. We had found an aristocratic drink which was so much better than the bitter coffee that had been adopted by the City coffee houses or worse still, the ale that England relied on due to bad supplies of water. &nbsp;Even when the cost of tea was dropping, we kept the price elevated through exorbitant taxes to ensure that the hoi polloi were not able to afford it. Or so we thought!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> So, how did this aristocratic drink, which cost an arm and a leg, come to be found in the teapots of ordinary folk from Lands End to York? Smuggling! Illegal tea landed all over the coastline but the rocky coasts of Devon and Cornwall were the ideal places to land contraband unnoticed by the prying eyes of the customs men or worse, the East India Company. What started as a trickle of boats with a couple of tea chests turned into huge organised crime. By the early 1780s, an estimated 50% of tea was being smuggled into this country and enjoyed at a fraction of the price of legal tea. By trying to keep tea as the national drink of the gentry, every Tom, Dick and Harry was able to get hold of tea and lower class households were affording to drink two cups of Rosie Lea a day. In 1784 the tax that had crept up to 119% was slashed to 12.5% bringing an end to much of this activity.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I always think of the rapid adoption of tea drinking in the country was like a tea bag placed in a pot of hot water, percolating through from coast to village, village to town until it had taken hold good and proper.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> So what next? The aristos didn&#39;t want to give up their tea, so they just needed to create a way of drinking it in a refined and genteel manner. The tea ceremony took on a new importance with the expensive tea service taking centre stage. If you could afford the delightful china from such companies as Spode, Minton or Wedgwood, you would be able to pour the hot tea straight into the cup without fear of it cracking and then you could add a drop of milk if desired. If your china couldn&rsquo;t stand up to this, you could place some milk into the cup already to temper the tea and thereby saving your china from tell-tale cracks. You could tell the class of a person by when they added milk to their tea &ndash; &nbsp;some snobs would describe people as &lsquo;milk in first&rsquo; types &ndash; i.e. not people like us!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 The Iconic Red Coats https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/iconic-red-coats/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/iconic-red-coats/#comments Fri, 23 Jun 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/iconic-red-coats/ An urban myth perpetuates that we chose red to avoid bloodstains showing on uniforms but this is pure poppycock An urban myth perpetuates that we chose red to avoid bloodstains showing on uniforms but this is pure poppycock<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_511.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The iconic red coat, worn by the British army for centuries, is seen as a symbol of British pomp and ceremony. To many, the scarlet woollen jacket with its characteristic long tails is a symbol of the British Empire worn in battle until the end of the 19<sup>th</sup> Century. Interestingly, it was first used in the English Civil War for Oliver Cromwell&rsquo;s New Model Army (a rather unpatriotic start to this most nationalist of uniforms!) and it would be used for centuries to come, either as battle dress or ceremonial garb. The English and later British soldiers were nicknamed &ldquo;redcoats&rdquo;. Mention redcoats to an American and their high school history comes flooding back. It was George Washington who coined the phrase in the Revolutionary War; a David and Goliath moment where the Colonies united against the sea of red uniforms and won. But how did we land on this striking shade of red?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Today, we might argue that red is our national colour, from post boxes to buses, this bright regal hue is hard to miss throughout Blighty, especially London. Nothing says London more than the number 15 Routemaster tootling past The Tower of London but surely, it was a questionable choice for soldiers? You would think that they would have stood out like the proverbial sore thumb. In fact, instead of a hindrance, the colour became a benefit. 18<sup>th</sup> and 19<sup>th</sup> Century battlefields would have been swamped with billows of thick grey smoke and jet black gunpowder, so even the freshest, cleanest, brightest redcoat would have struggled to stand out. However, its fighting chance of being noticed went a great way in helping us distinguish between friend and foe. An urban myth perpetuates that we chose red to avoid bloodstains showing on uniforms but this is pure poppycock &ndash; blood left a dark crimson, almost black, stain even on the reddest of jackets.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The bright red pigment, called Alizarin or Turkey Red (from its Middle Eastern roots) was a much prized dye or pigment for the Egyptians as well as the British militia. Found in madder root, also known as Rose Madder, the formula was complex and the methods to create it were fussy and over complicated. By the late 18<sup>th</sup> Century, persistent European dye experts and chemists had worked out how to make cheaper versions and getting the red that we clearly loved and cherished became much more affordable.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Whilst the British redcoat lives on in the Foot Guards, the Life Guards and also as officers&rsquo; mess dress for formal occasions, it&rsquo;s no longer used in combat. As warfare has changed, so has its uniform. Invisibility is key and blending in to environments is essential in most scenarios, so the British army has used the more practical khaki since 1902. We still love the red uniforms, whether at a full military tattoo or the distant marching band on a walk through London&rsquo;s royal quarters; it is a sight that both rouses the British national psyche and delights overseas visitors.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 A Turkish Rose https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-turkish-rose/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-turkish-rose/#comments Weds, 31 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-turkish-rose/ The most unusual was their black rose, the rarest of flowers, which originates from the nearby banks of the Euphrates. The most unusual was their black rose, the rarest of flowers, which originates from the nearby banks of the Euphrates.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_517.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Turkish town of Halfeti is a wonderful mix of Byzantine, Armenian, Egyptian and Ottoman heritage and a town well versed to trading with the world. The Levant Company was set up to create a relationship with the Ottoman Empire bringing exotic goods to English society.<br /> <br /> From spices to soft leathers, cloth to coffee, heavy damasks to golden currants, this trading company had control of the most desirable commodities of this region. Our relationship grew, the Ottoman Empire was intoxicating and by the 19th Century, London&rsquo;s aristocracy was in awe of this fading power. Great fortunes were to be made in the valuable raw silks and cottons that were considered more stylish than the home-grown silks of Soho and Spitalfields.<br /> <br /> Of all the commodities traded in and around the town of Halfeti, the most unusual was their black rose, the rarest of flowers, which originates from the nearby banks of the Euphrates. These roses bloom once a year and it is the combination of its terroir and the pH of the river that creates a rose of the darkest shade of red.</span><br /> <br /> <blockquote> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">&quot;This red develops into a soft black in the hot suns of the summer.&quot;</span>&nbsp;</span></div> </blockquote> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Halfeti black rose was most covetable especially to the gothic Victorians. The oil extracted from the rose petals forms the mid note of Halfeti is used to dramatic and mysterious effect.</span><br /> 0 In Conversation With Perfumer, Alex Lee https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-perfumer-alex-lee/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-perfumer-alex-lee/#comments Mon, 29 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-perfumer-alex-lee/ We spoke to Alex Lee, creator of our new Trade Routes fragrances, about his intriguing inspiration for Agarbathi & Paithani. We spoke to Alex Lee, creator of our new Trade Routes fragrances, about his intriguing inspiration for Agarbathi & Paithani.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_513.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>How did you start out in the Perfume industry?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> In 2007, I left my home of California for Lyon, France, in order to study French. I knew the French language would be critical to work in the industry. The beginnings of my perfumery studies started a few months later at the Grasse Institute of Perfumery, where I fell in love with the city of Grasse and its expertise in natural ingredients. Upon graduation, I moved to Paris to study at the Institut Sup&eacute;rieur International du Parfum de la Cosm&eacute;tique et de l&#39;Aromatique Alimentaire (ISIPCA) in Versailles. In 2011, I was accepted into the internal perfumery school at MANE, the company where I currently work. Since completing my training late 2013, I have been working on fine fragrance projects in MANE&rsquo;s Parisian creative center.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>What drew you to the world of fragrance? Did you always know you wanted to be a perfumer?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I was born far from the fragrance capitals in California&rsquo;s Silicon Valley, to a Taiwanese mother and Singaporean father, both with scientific backgrounds. For as long as I can remember, I was drawn to scent: I have vivid memories of chasing young girls in kindergarten to smell the shampoo in their hair. My pursuits in adolescence changed to perfume itself, and collecting and learning about perfume became a hobby.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In America, documentaries about Grasse or perfumery were not prevalent. Not knowing the perfumer career existed, I focused on a different calling: to care for people through medicine. I pursued bioengineering in college in parallel with a pre-med course load. A series of unexpected events led me to realize that perfume could be a form of medicine&mdash;a medicine for the spirit&mdash;and a fortunate encounter with someone in the perfume industry turned my compass towards Grasse.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Describe your style. Is your personality reflected in the fragrances you create?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> My ideas come from new ingredients associations combined with raw material overdoses. I try to resist external pressures to draw inspiration from or create towards existing olfactive forms that we know &lsquo;work&rsquo;. Ultimately, a brand&rsquo;s internal strategy dictates how much olfactive risk to take, which affects creativity. Personally, I am not truly satisfied with the final creation unless I have brought something new to the perfume art. With the Penhaligon&rsquo;s Trade Routes project, I was given carte blanche to create two purely creative fragrances with the only directions being the two themes: incense and spices.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>How long does it take you to develop a fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> The length of development time (sometimes up to a few years) depends on the deadline and the brand&rsquo;s satisfaction&mdash;most often than not, it is the deadline that dictates when the fragrance is done. Perfumery is an art and I am a perfectionist&mdash;the more time I have, the better the fragrance. But, what may be more critical than time is olfactive leadership. The Penhaligon&rsquo;s duo took only a few months; each round of reworks was efficient and moved the note forward quickly. This was pioneered by great olfactive vision and direction from Penhaligon&rsquo;s. In fact, we finished Paithani with just one round of reworks. It was pretty much the initial idea straight into the bottle! Agarbathi took a bit longer as we needed to improve its signature and power.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>What are your favourite materials and scents to work with?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I have no favourites. They are all indispensable in the different contexts of perfume creation. But in this moment, I do like milky ingredients.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>When did you first discover Penhaligon&rsquo;s?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> When I finished high school, I discovered the niche perfumery world. It did not take me long after to find Penhaligon&rsquo;s!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Do you have a favourite Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> My first favourite was <em>Blenheim Bouquet</em>. My most recent favourite is <em>Much Ado About The Duke</em>.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Tell us about the briefing process for Agarbathi and Paithani?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> The night before I received the brief, I was so excited I could not sleep! Penhaligon&rsquo;s wanted to expand the Trade Routes collection with a new destination: India. Two fragrances needed to be created to complement the Trade Routes collection inspired from the incense and spice trade routes. At the briefing, I was reminded of the three technical values of Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrances: the fragrances must be powerful, rich, and leave a strong sillage. Then Penhaligon&rsquo;s sent me back to the lab to play.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Where did you draw your inspiration from?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> For Paithani, I drew inspiration from the Indian masala chai drink: the delicious spicy black tea of cardamom, black pepper, nutmeg, and other spices with milk. The idea was to create the smell of the spicy cocktail with an emphasis on the milky note and the leathery aspect of black tea.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Agarbathi is meant to transport one inside an Indian temple. I wanted to create the smell of sandalwood and burning incense sticks dancing with the intoxicating sillage of jasmine garlands donned by the worshippers. In the background, there is the smell of milk being offered to the Hindu Gods.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Have you ever been to India?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Sadly, not yet, but it is one of my next trips!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Why do you use Milk in both fragrances?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> When I saw the brief, I was immediately drawn to the idea of masala chai. Milk is already an ingredient in the tea recipe; the initial idea of Agarbathi did not contain milk.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I knew milk is something very symbolic and sacred in the Hindu religion. At one point, I remembered that out of worship to their Gods, Hindus made offerings of milk. Milk was the final touch we put in Agarbathi to complete its story, ultimately linking the two fragrances together.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>How is it possible to use Milk in fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Due to technical reasons, perfumers cannot use natural milk directly in perfumes. But thanks to our scientists who synthesize perfumery molecules, perfumers have a small palette of ingredients that can help create the olfactive illusion of milk. Sulfurol is my favorite milky ingredient and I used it in both creations. This molecule, which also exists in nature, is used mostly in flavourings and has more of a warm milk facet.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>What does the Milk ingredient bring to a fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Sulfurol imparts creaminess, volume, and a new type of addiction to a perfume.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Is Milk the future?!</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I hope so!&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>When you are in London, what are your favourite places to visit?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Liberty London. I cannot seem to have enough of it.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known London - The Sounds of Columbia Road https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-sounds-of-columbia-road/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-sounds-of-columbia-road/#comments Thurs, 25 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-sounds-of-columbia-road/ <br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_505.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">If you&rsquo;re in Shoreditch or Bethnal Green on a Sunday morning, you&rsquo;ll be sure to spot a tote bag overflowing with tulips, a basket full of sunflowers or perhaps a yummy mummy lugging a lemon tree. You can bet they&rsquo;re all on their way home from the floral haven that is Columbia Road Flower Market.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This lively, colourful market takes place every Sunday just off Hackney Road. It&rsquo;s crammed with locals and tourists trying to snag a bargain and market-sellers, specializing in seasonal herbs, flowers and bushes. It&#39;s the noise of the market that gets me every time. As you approach, the hustle and bustle hits you and then the yelling starts! Get there at 9am, and the market&rsquo;s not yet fully going but the traders have started with their banter &ndash; &lsquo;get your roses here, my darling!&rsquo; &lsquo;look at these hardy Chrysanths&rsquo; by 1pm, the cries are more likely to be &lsquo;three bunches for a fiver&rsquo; &nbsp;&lsquo;here&rsquo;s a box of 24 for twelve pound!&rsquo; It&#39;s a short day &ndash; it&rsquo;s all over by 3pm so everyone is trying to make the most of the small window of opportunity.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> And don&rsquo;t forget &ndash; it&rsquo;s not only a flower market. Why not pop into one of the art galleries, antique shops or caf&eacute;s that make up the community of 60 independent shops here? Pick up some collectable furniture at Two Columbia Road, peruse some vintage fashion at Glitterati, check out some Cornish art at the Columbia Road Gallery or keep the kids happy at gift and interior shop, Dandy Star. It&rsquo;s also worth a pit-stop for some calamari at Lee&rsquo;s Seafoods, serving fish here since World War II.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> If you&rsquo;re on Columbia Road this Sunday, do take a moment mid-stroll to ponder on the history of this street. It was once a walkway for sheep from the rural East End heading to the slaughterhouse at Smithfields. It gained notoriety in the 1830s as the residence of the London Burkers. This gang would dig up freshly-buried bodies to sell on for anatomical study. It transpired that they also committed some murders in their house on this street, then Novia Scotia Gardens. It was such an infamous London crime, that the police charged tourists 5 shillings a head to visit their house, where they could also purchase souvenirs.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Later, the area became a dilapidated, poverty-stricken slum, which, in the 1860s, prompted philanthropist, Angela Burdett-Coutts, to build social housing here and start a market to help the residents earn a living. She was a lady of many talents &ndash; she endowed the bishopric of British Columbia (hence the name Columbia Road in honour of her) and was the president of the British Goat Society. What an important lady indeed. By Act of Parliament, the market&rsquo;s trading day was moved from Saturday to Sunday, to help the local Jewish population. Flower traders in Spitalfields and Covent Garden saw an opportunity to sell their Saturday leftovers here and it had soon become a street synonymous with bargain flowers and also caged songbirds. The rest, as they say, is history.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Columbia Road is the perfect place to stroll off a hangover on a summery Sunday morning &ndash; if that doesn&rsquo;t work, pop into the Birdcage pub and drink yourself a new one.&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <br style="font-size: 14px;" /> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/shootingjaydred/" style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 10px;">(PHOTO CREDIT JEROME YEWDALLL)</span></a><br /> <br /> 0 Little Known London - The Hampstead Pergola https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-hampstead-pergola/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-hampstead-pergola/#comments Weds, 24 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-hampstead-pergola/ If you were to be dropped into a little-known place called the Hill Garden, you might look around and guess that you were on a glorious hilltop near Florence or perhaps in a quaint English country garden. But, no, this magnificent floral paradise, is, in fact, hidden away on London’s very own Hampstead Heath. If you were to be dropped into a little-known place called the Hill Garden, you might look around and guess that you were on a glorious hilltop near Florence or perhaps in a quaint English country garden. But, no, this magnificent floral paradise, is, in fact, hidden away on London’s very own Hampstead Heath.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_503.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">If you were to be dropped into a little-known place called the Hill Garden, you might look around and guess that you were on a glorious hilltop near Florence or perhaps in a quaint English country garden. But, no, this magnificent floral paradise, is, in fact, hidden away on London&rsquo;s very own Hampstead Heath.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The highlight of the garden is undoubtedly its pergola with its imposing stone structure, adorned with spectacular flora. Green vines wind their way around its columns and in the spring, lilac wisteria nestle along its arches overhead. Indeed, the Hill Garden is a unique little spot and its secluded serenity carries with a slightly eerie atmosphere. Whilst clambering its stairs and nipping through its snickets, all alone, you might almost imagine yourself as a character in a Shakespearian romantic tragedy, or a gothic Bront&euml; melodrama.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The garden was the vision of Lord Leverhulme, who owned the attached house. The soap tycoon started brands like Sunlight and Lux and began the organisation that has today become Unilever. More than a businessman, though, he was a philanthropist, who had many friends and enjoyed socialising with, and helping others. The garden was created in 1905-6 as a luxurious way for him to entertain his various guests. It was built just as the Hampstead Northern Line extension was being constructed &ndash; and they used much of the soil dug up for the tube tunnels in building the garden, making for easy disposal of the underground spoils &ndash; a handy Edwardian win-win.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Left to fall into disrepair during the twentieth century, its more recent renovations have made it accessible, but have left it with a certain rustic feel, which only adds to its almost otherworldly charm. It&rsquo;s certainly beautiful, but prim and proper it is not. It feels ever so slightly dilapidated and overgrown. Mary Berry might call it &lsquo;informal&rsquo;. If you stumbled upon it unawares, you might even wonder if you were the first to see it in a century, such is its secret, time-capsule-like atmosphere. It&rsquo;s as close as you could come to a real-life Secret Garden.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Hill Garden pergola is one of the few places in London where it&rsquo;s possible to feel transported in both place and time to somewhere quite astonishingly different to the rest of our modern bustling city. Once an extravagant Edwardian pleasure garden for parties and promenades, this rugged, mysterious paradise is easily one of London&rsquo;s most enchanting hidden gems.<br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/anemoneprojectors/9482375049"><span style="font-size:10px;">(PHOTO CREDIT PETER O&#39;CONNOR)</span></a></span><br /> <br /> 0 Milk In Fragrance https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/milk-in-fragrance/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/milk-in-fragrance/#comments Thurs, 18 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/milk-in-fragrance/ <br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_515.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Inspired by the blend of powerful spices &amp; sweet milk in Masala Chai and the presence of milk in India ritual, milk accord is a heart note in the two new Trade Routes fragrances.<br /> Agarbathi pairs the tranquillity of the temple with the vibrancy of Life and Ritual. Paithani is inspired by soothing Chai, with notes of nutmeg, rose and milk.</span></em></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><em>Why do you use Milk in both fragrances (Paithani &amp; Agarbathi)?</em><br /> &nbsp;<br /> When I saw the brief (for the fragrances), I was immediately drawn to the idea of masala chai. Milk is already an ingredient in the tea recipe; the initial idea of Agarbathi did not contain milk. I knew milk is something very symbolic and sacred in the Hindu religion. At one point, I remembered that out of worship to their Gods, Hindus made offerings of milk. Milk was the final touch we put in Agarbathi to complete its story, ultimately linking the two fragrances together.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <em>How is it possible to use Milk in fragrance?</em><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Due to technical reasons, perfumers cannot use natural milk directly in perfumes. But thanks to our scientists who synthesize perfumery molecules, perfumers have a small palette of ingredients that can help create the olfactive illusion of milk. Sulfurol is my favourite milky ingredient and I used it in both creations. This molecule, which also exists in nature, is used mostly in flavourings and has more of a warm milk facet.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <em>What doe s the Milk ingredient bring to a fragrance?</em><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Sulfurol imparts creaminess, volume, and a new type of addiction to a perfume.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <em>Is the idea of Milk in fragrance the future?!</em><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I hope so!</span><br /> 0 Incense Route https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/incense-route/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/incense-route/#comments Mon, 15 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/incense-route/ The latest addition to Penhaligon's Trade Routes Collection, transport us to India. Agarbathi embodies the peacefulness of the temples of India, with hints of sandalwood, fir balsam and a heart note of velvety incense. The latest addition to Penhaligon's Trade Routes Collection, transport us to India. Agarbathi embodies the peacefulness of the temples of India, with hints of sandalwood, fir balsam and a heart note of velvety incense.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_508.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">The latest addition to Penhaligon&#39;s Trade Routes Collection, transport us to India. Agarbathi embodies the peacefulness of the temples of India, with hints of sandalwood, fir balsam and a heart note of velvety incense.</span></em><br /> &nbsp;</div> <span style="font-size:14px;">What springs to mind when you think of incense? Buddhist shrines? Catholic mass? hippies and patchouli? For most, incense conjures up images of ritualistic worship in the exotic lands of South Asia and the Far East, however, incense originated somewhere slightly closer to home. The ancient Egyptians began using incense in roughly 2400BC and, whilst they believed it helped ward off evil spirits, its main use was to overpower the wretched smells of day-to-day living and also in medicine as a cure for poisonous snakebites. As incense travelled beyond Egypt, this combination of religion and pragmatism accompanied it on its journey around the world.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> From the pharaohs and physicians of Egypt, incense spread both East and West. It arrived in Britain via the Roman Empire and the word incense comes from the Latin <em>incendere </em>meaning &lsquo;to burn&rsquo;. Whilst most of us are familiar with the Spice Route, the lesser-known Incense Route thrived between the 7<sup>th</sup> century BC and the 2<sup>nd</sup> century AD, allowing the trade of exotic fragrances, such as frankincense and myrrh on a triumphant path running from the bustling Mediterranean ports through Egypt and the Middle East and into northern India. Although religious uses were common, incense was used to a wide range of ends: to ward off the plague in Israel, to give an aura of invincibility to the helmets of samurai warriors in Japan and even to tell the time in China. Oh, how versatile those humble little sticks are!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The pomp of incense in religious rituals and ceremonies is undoubtedly its most iconic usage. Huge clouds of smoke fill Buddhist shrines in China and Taiwan, where large incense coils swing from the ceiling and throngs of worshippers waft bundles in the air as their chants echo through the intense fragrances. A more sombre ceremony can be found in orthodox churches in Europe, where puffs of smoke billow from the swinging thurible, particularly during Eucharist. And nowhere is incense more ubiquitous than India. From Rajasthan to Kerala, incense plays a crucial role in Hindu puja and prayer rituals, not only in the temple, but also in the home. Incense sticks made of bamboo can be found in street markets across the land; their colours as vibrant as their scents. Indeed, the fragrances we most associate with incense in the UK today were all first used in India: precious frankincense, delicate sandalwood and exotic cypress. In ancient Egypt, pinewood, grasses and cinnamon would have been far more common.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The English have had a slightly more reluctant attitude to incense. It was banned in religious worship at churches in Elizabethan England as it had come to be associated with petty superstition and sacrilegious idol worship. However, this didn&rsquo;t stop its pragmatic usage, even in churches. Cheeky churchwardens regularly used incense to perfume the church and rid it of more ominous odours. Whatever its use, its powerful and vivid scent allows incense to truly change the mood of a room in an instant. It releases tension and revitalises energy.&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known London - Secret Gardens in Bloom https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-secret-gardens-in-bloom/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-secret-gardens-in-bloom/#comments Tues, 09 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Alex C https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-secret-gardens-in-bloom/ As the weather gets warmer and first leaves and flowers start covering the capital I feel the need to follow the sunshine. As the weather gets warmer and first leaves and flowers start covering the capital I feel the need to follow the sunshine.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_481.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:12px;">Meet the Penhaligon&rsquo;s staff, working throughout our stately home and company,<br /> with a wealth of knowledge beyond the ins and outs of the esteemed Portrait&rsquo;s Family.<br /> <br /> Allow the staff to guide you through the streets of London, delve into fragrance and instil proper Penhaligon&rsquo;s dinner party etiquette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">As the weather gets warmer and first leaves and flowers start covering the capital I feel the need to follow the sunshine. Where is one to go for a stroll, read a book or parade around a new spring wardrobe<span style="font-size:12px;">?</span> I rounded up five of my favourite secret (or not so secret gardens) where you can let your mind relax and unwind and take in the scent of blooming flowers.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Isabella Plantation, South West London</strong><br /> A stunning 40 acre woodland garden set within a Victorian plantation established in 1830&#39;s in Richmond Park. It lures you in with its evergreen azaleas, which line the ponds and streams and put their beautiful flowers on display from late April.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Isabella_Plantation.jpg" style="width: 610px; height: 402px;" /><br /> <br /> <strong>Fenton House and Garden, North London</strong><br /> A beautiful 17<sup>th</sup>century merchant&rsquo;s house in Hampstead is accompanied by a walled garden with roses as well as a 300-year old orchard which boasts thirty different types of apple trees that flourish each year. From March onwards you can simply relax in these splendid surroundings or for the more active enjoy a game of croquet.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Fenton_House_2.jpg" style="width: 610px; height: 458px;" /><br /> <br /> <strong>The Inns of Court, Central London</strong><br /> A series of squares and courtyards between Theobalds Road, High Holborn and the Embankment are home to London&rsquo;s legal profession. Head to the smaller spaces such as Staple Inn and Fountain Court to sit down and read, surrounded by medieval charm which is rare to find in London. The larger spaces like Lincoln&#39;s Inn and The Temple are vibrant and elegant, ideal for a late afternoon picnic with friends.<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/inns_courts.jpg" style="width: 610px; height: 375px;" /></span></span><br /> <br /> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><b><span style="color: rgb(52, 52, 52);">Hampstead Pergola, North London</span></b></span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0.0001pt; background-image: initial; background-position: initial; background-size: initial; background-repeat: initial; background-attachment: initial; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><span style="color: rgb(52, 52, 52);">Hampstead Pergola is a true hidden treasure of the turn of the century, which will charm you with faded opulence. This raised walkway is covered in vines and exotic flowers, dramatically nestled in splendid gardens. Take a walk through this stunning location to experience its eerie atmosphere and enjoy the spectacular views over Hampstead Heath.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Hampstead_Pergola_2.jpg" style="float: left; width: 290px; height: 387px; margin: 1px 15px 15px 5px;" /><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Hampstead_Pergola.jpg" style="width: 290px; height: 387px; margin: 1px 5px 15px 15px; float: right;" /> </span></span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><strong>Eltham Palace and Gardens</strong><br /> When the sun is shining at the weekend, why not make a day trip down to Eltham Palace and Gardens, an Art-Deco mansion which will transport you back to the 1930&rsquo;s as you enjoy your picnic in its glorious ornamental gardens. Afterwards inhale the sweet smell of roses in the sunken rose garden and admire the herbaceous border designed by award-winning garden designer Isabelle Van Groeningen.</span></span><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Eltham_Palace.JPG" style="width: 610px; height: 407px;" /></p> 0 Savoy Steam Perfumer https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-perfumer/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-perfumer/#comments Fri, 05 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-perfumer/ At just 13 years old, Perfumer and creator of Savoy Steam, Juliette Karagueuzoglou realised she wanted to become a perfumer. At just 13 years old, Perfumer and creator of Savoy Steam, Juliette Karagueuzoglou realised she wanted to become a perfumer.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_471.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">PERFUMER: JULIETTE KARAGUEUZOLGLOU</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">At just 13 years old Juliette realised she wanted to become a perfumer.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">After her scientific Baccalaureate and a degree in chemistry, Juliette passed the ISIPCA entrance exam. While a student at ISIPCA, her course was combined with two year&#39;s work experience at Expressions Parfum&eacute;es in Grasse.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">At the end of her studies she joined IFF in March 2002, where she continues to work to this day.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Juliette Karagueuzoglou was awarded the Fashion Group International&#39;s Rising Star Award in 2010.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Juliette has worked on fragrances for YSL (L&rsquo;Homme), Versace (Versace Pour Femme Oud Oriental), Givenchy (Very Irresistible for Men) and many more&hellip;<br /> <br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/">Read more about Juliette and her scent memories from&nbsp;</a></u></span><u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/"><span style="font-size: 14px;">childhood and parenthood.</span></a></u><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></div> 0 Turkish Fouta https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/packaging/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/packaging/#comments Fri, 05 May 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/packaging/ The colours of Italian marble. A complexion of refinement and finesse. <br /><br /> But prey, is that a bow-tie or a Turkish Fouta? The colours of Italian marble. A complexion of refinement and finesse. <br /><br /> But prey, is that a bow-tie or a Turkish Fouta?<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_470.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="margin:0 auto;text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">With a custom-made and fabric gift box,<br /> we know that Saville Row is not far.<br /> With such a label, the oracle of The London Chronicle is almost be heard.</span><br /> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;">As crisp and clean as after a steam!</span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;">With order, we uplift the spirit.<br /> In sobriety, we find a certain evocation of the serene.</span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;">The colours of Italian marble.<br /> A complexion of refinement and finesse.</span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;">But prey, is that a bow-tie or a Turkish Fouta?</span></p> </div> <br /> 0 Leighton House - Behind the Scenes https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house-behind-the-scenes/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house-behind-the-scenes/#comments Fri, 28 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house-behind-the-scenes/ We continue Penhaligon’s Trade Routes journey around the world in fragrance through Morocco, Turkey and the Orient, finally reaching the home of spices and ancient silks. We continue Penhaligon’s Trade Routes journey around the world in fragrance through Morocco, Turkey and the Orient, finally reaching the home of spices and ancient silks.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_default.jpg"<br/><br/><style type="text/css"> .img-responsive.mobile { display: none; } @media only screen and (max-device-width: 480px) { .img-responsive { display: none; } .desktop { display:none; } .img-responsive.mobile { display: block; } }</style> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">We continue Penhaligon&rsquo;s Trade Routes journey around the world in fragrance through <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/">Morocco</a></u>, <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/">Turkey</a></u> and the <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/levantium-eau-de-toilette/">Caribbean</a></u>, finally reaching the home of spices and ancient silks.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Leighton House" src="/images/blogs/Leighton_Peacock.JPG" style="width: 300px; height: 400px; float: left; margin: 10px;" /><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Our Trade Routes exploration took us to Leighton House, once the home of artist Lord Frederic Leighton. Filled with tiles and ceramic artifacts Leighton collected on his travels in the Middle East, in the late 19thC, Leighton House is also the location of the most recent Trade Routes photoshoot.<br /> <br /> Here is a sneak peak, behind-the-scenes of the Trade Route Collection photoshoot.</span></span><br /> <br /> &nbsp;<br /> <div class="desktop"> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> &nbsp;</div> <img alt="" class="img-responsive" src="/images/blogs/Leighton_BTS.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 400px; float: left; margin-left: 10px; margin-right: 10px;" /> <img alt="" class="img-responsive" src="/images/blogs/Leighton_Ballons.JPG" style="width: 300px; height: 400px; float: right;" /> <img alt="Leighton House Dome" class="img-responsive" src=" /images/blogs/Leighton_Dome.jpg" style="width: 620px; height: 461px; margin: 15px 10px;" /> <img alt="" class="img-responsive mobile" src="/images/blogs/Leighton_BTS.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house"><u>Further explore Leighton House. </u> </a> </span> 0 Leighton House https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house/#comments Fri, 28 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/leighton-house/ Nestled down a lazy side street, behind Holland Park, sits Leighton House. To the passer-by, this redbrick building looks like a fairly humble, nondescript Victorian townhouse Nestled down a lazy side street, behind Holland Park, sits Leighton House. To the passer-by, this redbrick building looks like a fairly humble, nondescript Victorian townhouse<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_509.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Nestled down a lazy side street, behind Holland Park, sits Leighton House. To the passer-by, this redbrick building looks like a fairly humble, nondescript Victorian townhouse, but its exterior belies what&rsquo;s hidden inside. Staid, stuffy stately home this is not, it&rsquo;s more like wandering around a Victorian jewellery box. Leighton House is truly one of London&rsquo;s best-kept secrets. If we travelled into this gallery/museum/home through the keyhole and had to guess the owner&rsquo;s identity, we would be right in assuming that this Victorian owner was well travelled and was beguiled by the art and exoticism of the Arabian Orient.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Entering into the house, visitors uncover a treasure trove of beautiful art and stunning interiors. There&rsquo;s an almost palatial ambience to the entire building with its opulent friezes and impressive columns. Vibrant cerulean, vivid reds and shimmering golds line the walls and the ceilings in a true feast for the eyes. Particularly awe-inspiring is the Arab Hall with its Islamic tiles from Damascus, intricate mosaics and imposing golden dome. It was a privilege to be able to travel in these times, to visit and gain inspiration from not only the Europeans but further afield. To witness the scale of the Egyptian temples at Abu Simbel or Karnak or even to visit Istanbul&rsquo;s grand mosques for the first time must have been humbling and at the same time, amazing. In our Instagram society, we enjoy taking pictures for posterity, however, Victorian travellers would have brought home artefacts, tales and inspiration. The impact of this travel is clear on the owner of this house, the artist, Frederic Lord Leighton.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Leighton&rsquo;s house was built in 1866 as both a studio and private art gallery. People would have heard about this amazing home studio and wanted to visit to see his eclectic home and they did; even Queen Victoria dropped by for a viewing. Today, the walls are adorned with Leighton&rsquo;s most celebrated watercolours and oil paintings, along with work by other artists of the era, such as G.F. Watts, and also Renaissance artist and sculptor, Antonio Gamberelli.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The house is a wonderful gallery but as a home, it gives an important glimpse into the life of Lord Leighton. Sketches and letters are displayed in his personal studio as well as some personal artefacts in the surprisingly modest and simplistic bedroom. It&rsquo;s a home that tells the story of a man with an exquisite taste and a cosmopolitan savoir-faire, yet a peculiarly eccentric and solitary life. The opulent beauty of this hidden gem has been used a filming location for TV shows, such as Spooks, films, including Nicholas Nickleby and even the music video &lsquo;Gold&rsquo; by Spandau Ballet<em>. </em>I wonder what Lord Leighton would have made of the New Ro</span></span>mantics?&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 A Modern Dinner Party https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-modern-dinner-party/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-modern-dinner-party/#comments Tues, 25 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Jillian https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-modern-dinner-party/ We are living in a society where dinner parties have swept back into fashion. With this some of us find ourselves in a conundrum of how far we should follow British ‘Tradition’ We are living in a society where dinner parties have swept back into fashion. With this some of us find ourselves in a conundrum of how far we should follow British ‘Tradition’<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_482.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Meet the Penhaligon&rsquo;s staff, working throughout our stately home and company,<br /> with a wealth of knowledge beyond the ins and outs of the esteemed Portrait&rsquo;s Family.<br /> <br /> Allow the staff to guide you through the streets of London, delve into fragrance and instil proper Penhaligon&rsquo;s dinner party etiquette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">We are living in a society where dinner parties have swept back into fashion. With this some of us find ourselves in a conundrum of how far we should follow British &lsquo;Tradition&rsquo;, we frantically search the internet looking for ideas and advice, call friends and family while kicking ourselves for offering to host.<br /> <br /> When you are having a mini melt down about hosting, take a moment and think how lucky you are that we don&rsquo;t live in the Victorian era. William and Elisabeth Penhaligon would have taken etiquette very seriously. Mrs Penhaligon would have been hand writing invitations requesting the pleasure of a maximum of 12 people for a date 4-6 weeks away with guests all from the same circle of society, and sending by &lsquo;Special Messenger&rsquo;! While in the year 2017 we may casually drop a group &lsquo;WhatsApp&rsquo; or create a &lsquo;Paperless Post&rsquo; invitation advertising a Mexican fiesta with a wide range of people from all over.<br /> <br /> So, gone are the days of creating an elaborate 5 course menu, slaving for hours over the stove (or ordering your staff to), dusting off the cutlery canteen that houses pieces you are unsure what they are used for, while worrying the souffl&eacute; won&rsquo;t rise.<br /> <br /> Some tips on how to host a relaxed but memorable dinner party in 2017:<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Plan ahead: Once you have a confirmed dates with your guests start to think of a theme for the menu, don&rsquo;t over stretch yourself remember this is a party. A theme makes it much easier when choosing courses and dressing the table, keep in mind if you have any guests who don&rsquo;t eat certain things<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Practice: Ensure you have made the food before the event, no one needs the added stress of worrying about cooking times and taste, additionally it means as a host you can enjoy a refreshing pre-dinner drink<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; The Table, this is the perfect place to add a touch of tradition with you own flare:<br /> <br /> o &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Linen napkins instead of paper, as well as traditional it also adds the feeling of luxury<br /> o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Flowers on the table, this doesn&rsquo;t need to be a display you could add multiple vases&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">along the table &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;or in a circle, moss plants create warmth and add a modern touch<br /> o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Candles are a great decoration, just ensure they are not scented, you don&rsquo;t want your&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">food to taste&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">of your favourite candle. If you want to use a scented candle it is best to&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">burn before your guests&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">arrive, maybe while having drinks<br /> o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Charger plates can change a table instantly as well as protecting your table from the&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">heat of the&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, serif;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">plates<br /> o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Set the table the night before, this means you can move things about without feeling&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">rushed. I&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, serif;">&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px;">&nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">change my table as much as I move about the decorations on the Christmas</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">tree!<br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Start with a cocktail hour or two, if things go wrong will your guests notice!?<br /> <br /> <br /> Happy dining<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Some of my favourite shops for table items<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Brissi<br /> Great for; Candles, Candle Holders, Linen Napkins and Glassware<br /> <br /> Anthropologie<br /> Fun crockery and serving dishes<br /> <br /> Neptune<br /> Table centres, candles, linens<br /> <br /> Zara Home<br /> Table runners, Candles, Fun cutlery, Glassware, Charger Plates<br /> <br /> Your family&rsquo;s cupboards!<br /> You can usually find a bit of traditional tableware</span></span></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Savoy Cocktail https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-cocktail/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-cocktail/#comments Mon, 10 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-cocktail/ An elegant Martini style cocktail, created by Elon Soddu of the Beaufort Bar in The Savoy Hotel, inspired by our new fragrance Savoy Steam. An elegant Martini style cocktail, created by Elon Soddu of the Beaufort Bar in The Savoy Hotel, inspired by our new fragrance Savoy Steam.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_496.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Beaufort Bar, sitting within the Savoy&rsquo;s former cabaret bar, matches its theatrical setting with a drinks menu inspired by the bar&#39;s long history with burlesque &amp; cabaret and the many famous, flamboyant characters who frequented the hotel.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <span style="font-size:16px;">How to Make...&nbsp;The Final Touch<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Ingredients:<br /> 40 ml Bombay Gin<br /> 15 ml Briotet Rose liqueur<br /> 15 ml Cocchi Rosa<br /> 5 ml Aperol<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The cocktail should be stirred with ice and served in a Martini Glass and garnished with a lime twist.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="text-align: center;">The drink is a very elegant Martini style cocktail, created by Elon Soddu of the Beaufort Bar at The Savoy Hotel, inspired by our new fragrance&nbsp;</span><u style="font-size: 13px; text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/savoy-steam-collection/">Savoy Steam</a></u><span style="text-align: center;">.</span></span> 0 Little Known London - The American Bar https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-american-bar/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-american-bar/#comments Sun, 02 Apr 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-american-bar/ Out of what was a defensive move to save his eponymous opera company came the wondrous idea of the Savoy hotel. It was the first London hotel to encourage the London society to visit for drinks, dinners and dances and thereby becoming the place to be seen. Out of what was a defensive move to save his eponymous opera company came the wondrous idea of the Savoy hotel. It was the first London hotel to encourage the London society to visit for drinks, dinners and dances and thereby becoming the place to be seen.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_494.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Savoy Hotel opened for business on 6<sup>th</sup> August 1889, the brainchild of Richard D&rsquo;Oyly Carte, the Gilbert &amp; Sullivan impresario. It was a stroke of good fortune that a hotel was built at all. The D&rsquo;Oyly Carte Society was gaining fans and followers from all over the world especially America. Richard was wary of copycats stealing his ideas in the United States, so decided to stage a D&rsquo;Oyly Carte production of the Pirates of Penzance in New York. This not only stopped others trying to muscle in on his success but also gave him first hand experience of this city&rsquo;s famous hospitality. He was impressed and delighted with the level of style, service and luxury that he experienced in New York hotels and so brought this idea back to London. This was about to shake up the London hotel scene for both Londoners and visitors alike. Out of what was a defensive move to save his eponymous opera company came the wondrous idea of the Savoy hotel. It was the first London hotel to encourage the London society to visit for drinks, dinners and dances and thereby becoming <em>the</em> place to be seen. It also became a respectable place for ladies to dine together, something that had not been possible any time before this.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The American bar opened a few years later, offering American style drinks or cocktails. The Americans had revolutionised drinking habits; they were mixing different alcohols together in the same drink to create martinis and other cocktails. The English usually mixed alcohol with waters (soda, fresh or tonic) e.g. whisky and water or gin and tonic. In 1903, Ada Coleman or &lsquo;Coley&rsquo;, to her customers, was appointed bartender and it was during her time that the first of many famous cocktails were created. You can still ask for her &lsquo;Hanky Panky&rsquo; today (oo, matron!). Harry Craddock, Ada&rsquo;s successor, is possibly the most famous of the Savoy bartenders who gave us a fair few delicious and intoxicating cocktails but also compiled the legendary Savoy Cocktail book aka the bartender&rsquo;s bible. It hit the bookshops on 21<sup>st</sup> October 1930. The American bar came into its own during US Prohibition; it&rsquo;s amazing how many Americans needed to travel to London for business during this time!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The American Bar at The Savoy is the longest surviving of the US-inspired bars and little has changed here since the days of glamorous movie stars enjoying a drink or two here. I like to play a Savoy version of the game &lsquo;which historical figures would you like to invite for dinner?&rdquo; I would include the following:&nbsp; Winston Churchill, Charlie Chaplin, Rock Hudson, Fred Astaire, Marilyn Monroe, Marlene Dietrich, Liza Minnelli, The Queen Mother and John Wayne. I would also get Ada and Harry back to oversee the cocktails and see if Richard D&rsquo;Oyly Carte fancied seeing how far his hotel had come. Now, how many is that? Thirteen! We need Kaspar the Cat!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known London - Kaspar The Cat Continued... https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat-two/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat-two/#comments Fri, 31 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat-two/ As you near this piece of art, you will notice a reflection in the column. As it becomes clearer, you will now see a perfect reflection of the famous Kaspar. As you near this piece of art, you will notice a reflection in the column. As it becomes clearer, you will now see a perfect reflection of the famous Kaspar.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_495.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">The story continues&hellip;</span><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> In 2010, The Savoy re-opened after a redesign and the ultimate upgrade. It was received with a great deal of interest and anticipation. In honour of Kaspar, the riverside restaurant was named the Kaspar Seafood Bar &amp; Grill &ndash; a nod to the feline&rsquo;s favourite food! Within it sits another cat, this time in white bronze and chrome, designed by Jonty Hurwitz. You may miss it on the way into the Art Deco inspired dining space but as you leave the restaurant, look out for this piece of art comprising a mirrored column and a section of a circle almost acting as a protective barrier around it.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As you near this piece of art, you will notice a reflection in the column. As it becomes clearer, you will now see a perfect reflection of the famous Kaspar.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Kaspar The Cat https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/#comments Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/ In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form. In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_489.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form. He will not respond as he is made of wood, sculpted out of a piece of London Plane tree. He sits upright with a glorious tail that looks almost as if he has a handle! Very occasionally, he is moved from his front of house vantage and is taken to one of the many restaurants and private dining rooms of the hotel. He has a very important role. This dashing black cat joins diners when there is a table of 13. He will sit discreetly beside his table setting, a reminder of a rather sad and unfortunate incident that took place in 1898.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Early in that year, a guest of the Savoy, Woolf Joel, held a dinner for friends in the Pinafore Room. On the evening itself, a last minute cancellation meant that the booking was now for 13 people. This caused much discussion about the superstition associated with the unlucky number including the myth that the first person to leave a table of 13 would be the first to die. Joel, being the consummate host, and probably not superstitious, left the table ahead of his guests. On his subsequent return to Johannesburg just a few weeks later, he was shot dead.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Savoy and much of London society heard this shocking news - not the best PR for this new hotel! Arrangements were made for any future tables of this unlucky number to be accompanied by a fourteenth &lsquo;guest&rsquo;.&nbsp; This was a member of the Savoy staff who sat amongst the unlucky others. He must have felt like a spare part trying not to listen in to the stilted conversation of the other diners who were desperately trying to ignore him!&nbsp; A more permanent solution came about in 1926. The architect, Basil Ionides, a leading force in the Art Moderne (Art Deco) movement, sculpted a black cat named Kaspar. He became the hotel&rsquo;s mascot and amused such guests as Winston Churchill as he dined within the hotel with fellow members of &ldquo;The Other Club&rdquo;. Winston was such a big fan that when he heard that Kaspar had been &lsquo;abducted&rsquo; during a moment of high jinx during WWII, he allegedly saw to Kaspar&rsquo;s safe return.<br /> <br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat-two/"><span style="font-size: 13px;">To be continued...</span></a></u></span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Savoy Court https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/#comments Weds, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/ This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out... This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_490.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Everything about the Savoy is grand, from its dramatic Art Deco fa&ccedil;ade to the illuminated Savoy sign. The only way to arrive at this hotel is by taxi cabriolet or if you are lucky, one of the Savoy&rsquo;s own Rolls Royce, via the short but significant road that leads up from The Strand to the liveried doormen waiting for you. You are entering the beautiful Savoy; the grand dame of London&rsquo;s hotels, one of the most historic and well respected in the world.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out - Savoy Court. &nbsp;This little street is the only place in the UK where you drive on the right hand side of the road. You are probably wondering why this is. Firstly, Savoy Court is privately owned and thereby is not governed by the UK&rsquo;s traffic regulations. Secondly, it was done for practical reasons. To understand this, I will take you back to 1904 when the road was incorporated into the Strand extension of the hotel. Imagine a horse-drawn carriage approaching the hotel, the driver seated on the right and a dignitary or a lady sat behind him. This was the respectable way to travel. As the carriage approached the hotel on the right hand side of the road, the door could be opened allowing them to walk straight into the hotel.&nbsp; It was easier to make this small change to the road than to make all carriage and subsequent cars shift the placement of their respected guests riding in the cars.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is still in practice today. As your knowledgeable cab driver approaches the hotel, your door will be opened by one of the doormen and you can make your own version of an entrance in to the hotel. Imagine the indignity of having a doorman run around the car to open the door on the roadside or worse still, having to open the door yourself and step out, potentially risking a contretemps with another driver &ndash; its just not the done thing!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Savoy Steam Story https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/#comments Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/ A marbled hall of redemption. Vaulted ceilings to uplift one’s spirit. Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe. A marbled hall of redemption. Vaulted ceilings to uplift one’s spirit. Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_467.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">HAMMAM BOUQUET, the very first PENHALIGON&rsquo;S fragrance!</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A marbled hall of redemption.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Vaulted ceilings to uplift one&rsquo;s spirit.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">So between the tiresome chores of reading the paper and being measured for a new suit, a gentleman could take a steam bath and attend to his Toilette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But now here&rsquo;s the surprise.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A woman could too.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Come, come, this way, 12 Duke of York Street is the address.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Round the corner - in time and place.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A haven, a hammam, a hiatus from the grey and the grime.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Exclusively for the fairer sex.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Opening its doors from the first years of the 20th century. One of the first you see. Because whilst the original steam baths had included a women&rsquo;s room the tiresome constraints of finance and planning had thwarted Mr Penhaligon&rsquo;s original dream.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But like all dreams married to conviction,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">the doors have opened. It is 1910.</span></div> 0 #ScentMemories - Adrian https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/#comments Thurs, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Adrian https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/ Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those "discussions" of years past still looming over the tree lot. Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those "discussions" of years past still looming over the tree lot.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_493.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-size:13px;">As we move onto day five of our #ScentMemories journey, we are taken to family Christmas in New York with Penhaligon&#39;s own Adrian Copeland.</span><br /> <br /> Every holiday season I look forward to our yearly outing to find the &quot;perfect&quot; Christmas tree.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Growing up in NYC, and in an Italian-Irish family, the yearly &#39;enjoyable&#39; family outing was also the cause of many a &#39;family discussion&#39;. This conversation between my parents would always transpire in the middle of the tree lot. My mom would always want a &quot;Symmetrically Perfect&quot; tree with equal amounts of blue and green needles. My father only had one requirement in a tree- &ldquo;it had to be BIG&quot;. &nbsp;Hence the start of each year&rsquo;s &lsquo;family outing&rsquo; ultimately became that year&rsquo;s topic for discussion at Christmas dinner with the entire extended family clan.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">This family tradition goes back to my childhood, both the search for the tree and the ensuing &#39;discussions&#39;.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those &quot;discussions&quot; of years past still looming over the tree lot.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Magically, I am transported back in time to all those Christmas past and the wonderful memories of finding the &quot;perfect tree: and the yearly &ldquo;dinner table discussions&quot; of my family.</span></div> 0 #ScentMemories - Juliette https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/#comments Thurs, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Juliette https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/ Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart. Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_492.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <em>Master Perfumer and creator of <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/savoy-steam/">Savoy Steam</a>, Juliette Karagueuzoglou recounts Scent Memories from&nbsp;her childhood and parenthood.</em><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">It&rsquo;s really hard to choose among my memories since they are so closely related to emotions&hellip; each one reminds me beautiful and specific moments and people.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>My children:</strong> It sounds like a clich&eacute; but it&rsquo;s so true! I cannot start without mention my perfect memory of my children&rsquo;s smell. This so intense attachment between mother and child through scents is like an animal instinct that connects me most to the animals we are&hellip; Their smell changes and is like I could really smell it again: from the warm and soft milk smell around their lips and the cute gruyere cheese smell of their lovely baby feet to the more persistent smells when they are children. These smells are not always good, I know, but it reminds us of our animality and I love it. It&rsquo;s extremely important for me; I cannot imagine a world without human smells. I would have loved to capture these smells during my children first months but, failing that, I&rsquo;m glad to have it engraved in my memory.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>At Home:</strong> It&rsquo;s about the daily life that I remember best. I have so sweet memories of my childhood&hellip; my sun-warmed skin, smelling like a biscuit! My parent&rsquo;s fragrances that I could smell when they woke me up in the morning (very aromatic notes for my father who worn Drakkar Noir during years and years). The slightly bitter and tenacious smell of the dark chocolate that my parents used to eat in the evening, just before hugging me when I went to bed. Little girl, I always knew who were coming to have dinner with us at home thanks to the fragrance my parent&rsquo;s friends worn, I could recognize them once they removed they coats. It&#39;s funny: I still associate them to the fragrances they worn at that time, although most of them have already changed it.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Juliette_Karagueuzoglou.jpg" style="width: 235px; height: 329px; float: right;" /><br /> <strong>During Holidays:</strong> Summer smells, the concrete after the warm storm, wet and dusty at the same time. The Landes forest&#39;s resinous yet fresh smell of sun-warmed pines announcing the beginning of the holidays after 7 hours on the road&hellip; The rainy mornings at my grandmother&rsquo;s house and the hedge box in her garden.&nbsp; The solar and salty breeze on the way to go to the beach where, just before the sand dune, we already had a foretaste of the ocean.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>School time:</strong> Such a nice time! I can feel it again through my scented memories: the lindens of the court, the wet sponge to clear the chalk from the blackboard, the pencil sharpener, the odors of glue and painting. And, of course, the cooking smell that I immediately recognized after pushing the door, back from the school.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> And so much more! Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 #ScentMemories - Thomas https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/#comments Weds, 15 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Thomas https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/ Whilst Iris Prima is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it’s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss! Whilst Iris Prima is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it’s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_491.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">Day three of our trip down #ScentMemories Lane. Thomas Dunckley (or The Candy Perfume Boy) tells us of his love of all things Penhaligon&rsquo;s. Thomas is a self-proclaimed Perfume Addict and runs a Jasmine Award winning perfume blog that chronicles his obsession with fragrance&hellip;.</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Seeing as Penhaligon&rsquo;s have been the purveyors of fine British perfumery since 1870, many Brits have found themselves holding at least one scented memory linked to a classic or modern scent from the house of Penhaligon&rsquo;s and I am certainly no exception. I&rsquo;ve always been drawn to the cheeky and eccentric style of Penhaligon&rsquo;s - a style that is sometimes mischievous and always quintessentially British. So many of their fragrances have been with me at important parts of my life over the last ten years, whether that be at my graduation <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/vaara-eau-de-parfum/">(Vaara)</a></u>&nbsp;or pivotal job interviews (you can never go wrong with <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/sartorial-eau-de-toilette/">Sartorial</a></u>, ever). Here are just three of my favourite Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrances and the scent memories I associate with them.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">My very first Penhaligon&rsquo;s scent was Amaranthine, which at the time of launch was something quite scandalous indeed, evoking the warm skin of the inner thigh with its strange condensed milk note and overdose of tropical white flowers. My experience with it is less x-rated and for me, Amaranthine&rsquo;s tropical blooms, which are somewhere between the fresh banana tones of ylang ylang and the comfort of warm milk, will always be a warm wintry accompaniment that took the edge off the harshest of winter chills. At one point in time my scarf never stopped smelling of Amaranthine and whenever I catch a whiff of it, I think of winter.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">One of the most evocative fragrances ever created by Penhaligon&rsquo;s is the remarkable Ostara - an ode to the daffodil from bud to bloom. Smelling Ostara the key impression is, unsurprisingly, of daffodils but I&rsquo;m reminded of childhood times playing in my garden with my brothers and sisters. Ostara evokes sunshine and flowers but also cool earth and roots. It&rsquo;s an optimistic fragrance that speaks of those carefree summer days that felt endless and where grass stains and mud pies were never a bad thing.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance that boasts the most potent scent memory for me is most definitely <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/">Iris Prima</a></u>&nbsp;and not because I wore it at a particular time or place. Whilst <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/">Iris Prima</a></u>&nbsp;is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it&rsquo;s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss!</span></span></span></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/categories/IRISPRIMA_blog_candy.jpg" /></span></span></span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">There really is a Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance for every occasion and every memory and I very much look forward to making new ones with some of the brand&rsquo;s more recent offerings. Hmmm, that reminds me, I have a date with the <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/much-ado-about-the-duke-eau-de-parfum/">Duke</a></u> that I must get to&hellip;<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <strong><a href=" https://thecandyperfumeboy.com/" target="_blank"> Read more from The Candy Perfume Boy here.</a></strong></span></span></span></span></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 #ScentMemories - Alex Lee https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/#comments Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/ I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her. I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_488.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Born in California, Alex was fascinated by scents as a child, chasing girls on the playground to smell their deliciously shampooed hair. Progressively, he developed a passion for fragrances and began to collect perfume bottles. During his studies for a career in medicine, Alex realized that the evocative nature of perfume served as a form of emotional medicine. In 2008, he was admitted in the Grasse Institute of Perfumery.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In 2013, Alex was the winner of the young perfumer competition &quot;The Scent of Esxence - 5 Years of Excellence&quot;</span></span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">When I decided to pursue perfumery in France, I knew I had to speak French. I left California and started my journey by learning the language in Lyon.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I remember taking the Lyonnais subway to return to my host family after a day of classes. Sitting across from me, I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her and I offered her a sample of Guerlain&rsquo;s Shalimar. She sprayed the perfume on the top of her hand and smelled it. The most amazing thing happened: she smiled! During the entire trip, she held her hand close to her nose. On her face, you could almost see a war between the joy and trouble take place. As she got off at her stop, the woman flashed me a smile and whispered, &ldquo;Thank you, thank you very much.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> My childhood dream was to become a doctor to help others. This fragrant memory and others remind me that a perfume has a psychological power to bring out joy, confidence, energy, and intense emotions &ndash; the best out of a person. I am satisfied knowing that perfumery could allow me to heal people but in another way.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 #ScentMemories - Mona https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/#comments Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Monalogue https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/ A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_487.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">At Penhaligon&#39;s we understand the emotive power of scent. It can unlock memories and open doors; it can stop us in our tracks, lost somewhere for a moment in time. Recollections triggered by a dusting of iris, a whisper of clove, a burst of juicy nectarine, a trail of smoky incense, a creamy lick of vanilla.<br /> <br /> Nation Fragrance Day is approaching and in celebration, together with the Fragrance Foundation, we explore #ScentMemories with a series of guest&rsquo;s blogs.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">First Mona a blogger and Instagrammer from Somerset shares her tales of dressing tables full of perfume bottles and her love of Equinox Bloom&hellip;</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">We too often overlook the importance of scent; its presence in our memory is nothing short of astounding. A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one, or even resent a previous unpleasant encounter. Scent takes us on a journey that is for no two people quite the same.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I&rsquo;m probably not alone in saying that my earliest explicit memories of fragrance come from my mother. She had a large collection of perfumes, most of them gifts from my father who travelled a lot. Every few months a new bottle would arrive on her dressing table, a different shape, size and language from the last. When my mother got through the fragrance, she would give me the bottle. Over time I accumulated quite a collection of bottles, and if I were lucky they would contain a few leftover drops for me to savor.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> <br /> <img alt="" img="" src=" /images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Gate_1.png" style="width: 303px; height: 375px; font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px; float: left;" /><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Gate_2.png" style="width: 302px; height: 373px; float: right;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <table border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="1" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">As I grew older, my mother started to travel more. When I was fifteen, she returned from Italy with a perfume - for me! It was a sweet floral smell with a hint of vanilla. It was fun and vibrant. It was new. I couldn&rsquo;t have matched that period of my life with a better fragrance if I tried. I stayed out late, I met new people, discovered new things and I fell in love, all the while accompanied by that perfume.</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Equinox_Bloom.JPG" style="width: 300px; height: 400px; font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px; margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: right;" /><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Of course, scents don&rsquo;t always allude to pleasant memories. I wen</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">t through a phase of complicated grief in my late teens after losing my mother unexpectedly. I let my emotions get the better of me in a bereavement group once a week. The air was filled by the scent of the most intrusive of lemongrass air fresheners. Needless to say I have since acquired a strong distaste for the scent of lemongrass.<br /> <br /> Today I am in my mid-twenties. I wear Equinox Bloom. I chose this perfume in a profiling session, simply because I liked it. But perhaps there&rsquo;s more to it than that. Perhaps the base notes of Ambrox and Benzoin Siam take me back to my childhood collection of fragrances from afar. Perhaps the sweet spring floral notes take me back to my carefree teenage days. And perhaps I would have turned my nose at the fragrance were it to contain the slightest hint of lemongrass.</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>Read more from Lifestyle Blogger &amp; Photographer Mona on:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/">http://www.monalogue.co.uk/</a></strong><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Floral Scents Make You Happy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/#comments Fri, 10 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/ Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood. Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_486.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood. Floral Scents, for example, are scientifically proven to make you feel happier.<br /> <br /> Luckily for you Penhaligon&rsquo;s have a myriad of floral scents to have you walking on air.<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/floral-fragrances/">Floral fragrances</a></u>, the softest and most tender fragrance family, are the height of decorum. Florals can be either &ldquo;soliflores&rdquo;: translations of single flower notes, or &ldquo;bouquets&rdquo;: a blend of floral notes to create a beautiful feminine impression.<br /> <br /> What&rsquo;s more, they don&rsquo;t just increase your own happiness, they can help you boost the spirit of others. Studies have shown the act of stopping to take in the scent of a fresh rose and interaction with your olfactory sensors can increase levels of compassion and kindness towards others.<br /> <br /> Living with flowers and floral stimuli such as scented candles and diffusers, in the home can decrease stress levels and cure Monday moods. <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lavandula-eau-de-parfum/">Lavender</a></u> and camomile, known for their soothing effect on people, are often used to destress. The strong sweet fragrance of <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/">gardenia</a></u> and <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/us/luna-eau-de-toilette/">jasmine</a></u> boosts your mood. These sweet and creamy flowers mimic their natural tropical habitat, passing a blissful mood.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Be Happy! <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/fragrances/">See the full collection</a></u></span></span><br /> 0 Mother’s Day at The Savoy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/#comments Weds, 08 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Charlotte https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/ Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon’s and The Savoy. Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon’s and The Savoy.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_483.jpg"<br/><br/><div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">In celebration of the upcoming launch of <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/coming-soon/">Savoy Steam</a></u>, we have partnered with The Savoy to offer an exquisite afternoon tea experience this Mother&rsquo;s Day.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon&rsquo;s and The Savoy. Share a traditional tea for two in the beautiful Thames Foyer, and receive a stunning Savoy bouquet &amp; a bottle of our new floral fragrance, Savoy Steam Eau de Parfum.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">To make a booking please call the restaurant reservations team on +44 (0)20 7420 2111 between 09:00 to 20:00 BST<br /> <br /> &lsquo;PENHALIGON&rsquo;S&rsquo; must be quoted when booking<br /> <br /> Mother&#39;s Day Afternoon Tea Experience - &pound;200. One EDP and Bouquet per booking.<br /> Bookings available from Monday 6th March until Monday 7th August.&nbsp;</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 10px;">Image Credit. Red Photographic.com</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Penhaligon’s x Ayumi Togashi https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/#comments Weds, 01 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/ We sit down with Paris-based illustrator Ayumi Togashi, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family. We sit down with Paris-based illustrator Ayumi Togashi, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_437.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Since graduating from the&nbsp;Studio Ber&ccedil;ot, in 2003, Japanese-born artist Ayumi Togashi has created prints and illustrations for luxury fashion and perfume houses.&nbsp;We sat down with the Paris-based illustrator, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family.</span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>1. Whe</strong></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>n did you know you wanted to become an artist?</strong><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Ayumi_1.jpg" style="font-size: 14px; width: 251px; height: 335px; float: right; margin: 5px 10px;" /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Ever since I was little I have always enjoyed drawing women. It was when I came to France to study fashion I realised just how much I loved to draw.<br /> <br /> My experiences&nbsp;developed with luxurious fashion&nbsp;companies such as Chlo&eacute;, Sonia Rykiel, Pacorabanne, etc in embroidery, printing and illustration.<br /> <br /> I quickly joined my agent, Kajsa (Agent&amp;Artist)<br /> who I knew from being a student. Kajsa quickly became a good adviser and partner.<br /> <br /> Today my work applies in a range of fields such as mode,&nbsp;packaging,&nbsp;books, short movie, textiles. All these fantastic experiences allow me to continue learning along the way.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>2. What inspires you/what were your earliest influences?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I&rsquo;ve been always fascinated by attitude and clothes I see in the street.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>3. Describe your style.</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Childish. Unfinished. Suggestive.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>4. Can you tell us a little about your creative process? How does an idea turn into an illustration &ndash; and how long does it take?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Given a subject, I develop inspirations and imaginations during walks down the street. Briefings and hints are everywhere. I like sketching at the coffee terrace. A first sketch is sometimes enough, sometimes they need to be reworked.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br /> <strong>5. When did you first discover Penhaligon&rsquo;s.</strong><br /> <br /> I discovered Penhaligon&#39;s walking in Paris. I was drawn to the traditional Britishness of the bottles.&nbsp;<br /> <strong>&nbsp;</strong></span><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>6. Do you have a favourite Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> All of them are classic and elegant. Luna is my favourite.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>7. What inspiration did you take from the characters?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Mostly english, traditional, high&nbsp;society families.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>8. What&rsquo;s your favourite character/fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Lord George is my favourite member of the portrait family, I think his fragrance really matches his&nbsp;personality.<br /> &nbsp;</span> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>9. If you could be one of the Portraits characters, who would you be<br /> and&nbsp;</strong></span><strong style="font-size: 14px;">why?</strong></div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The Duke, because his character and scent are very seductive.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Ayumi_2.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 602px;" /></span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <div> <br /> To see more of Ayumi&rsquo;s illustrations visit <u><strong><a href="http://agentandartists.com/artists/ayumi-togashi/">http://agentandartists.com/artists/ayumi-togashi/</a></strong></u></div> 0 Savoy Steam Eau de Cologne https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/#comments Tues, 28 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/ Hallelujah, life alive! Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations. A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness! Hallelujah, life alive! Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations. A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_469.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Hallelujah, life alive!</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness!</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The wet-plunge, the dry rub-down.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Plunging from heat to cold.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">In steam and water, sensations multiply.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The cooling eucalyptus, and an ambrosial aromatic rosemary ointment</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">shot through with lemon primofiore.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And no less zealous.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Fir balsam and white cedar</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">bring spirited blond traction, that chimes with the</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Masterful blend of resins &amp; incense.</span></div> 0 Number One Fan https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/ In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams Penhaligon’s Portraits design. What’s more it’s scented! In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams Penhaligon’s Portraits design. What’s more it’s scented!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_485.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">The humble beginnings of the fan can be traced back as far as ancient Egypt, keeping the flies off the Pharaoh. The Japanese are responsible for designing the folding variety and by the time we reached the 16th Century they were being used as a way to discretely communicate to others. Something that really took off in the Victorian era. What a secretive bunch they were! See The Language of Flowers<strong> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers/">here.</a>&nbsp;</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> A beginner&rsquo;s guide to Fan Flirtation:<br /> A very quick fanning movement = &ldquo;I am engaged&rdquo;<br /> A slow fanning movement = &ldquo;I am married&rdquo;<br /> Holding the fan to the lips = &ldquo;Kiss me&rdquo;<br /> Or for something a little more sinister&hellip;<br /> Twirling a fan in the left hand = &ldquo;I wish to be rid of you&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams<strong> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/">Penhaligon&rsquo;s Portraits</a></strong>&nbsp;design. What&rsquo;s more it&rsquo;s scented!<br /> And what&rsquo;s more they are back in vogue! Popping up on the Spring/Summer 2017 catwalks. A beautiful summer accessory and self-cooling aid. Not only will you be fashion forward and keeping cool (when summer arrives) but also wafting <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/fragrances/"><strong>beautiful scents</strong></a><strong>&nbsp;</strong>for everyone to admire. And very useful for a little flirting!<br /> One might be lucky enough to still pick one up in store&hellip;<strong><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">pop in and ask!</a></strong></span></span> 0 Savoy Steam Eau De Parfum https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/ And now, today, in PENHALIGON’S most natural habitat. We have retuned. With a fresh demeanour. We will leave with a fresh soul. And now, today, in PENHALIGON’S most natural habitat. We have retuned. With a fresh demeanour. We will leave with a fresh soul.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_468.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">And now, today, in PENHALIGON&rsquo;S most natural habitat.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">We have retuned.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">With a fresh demeanour.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">We will leave with a fresh soul.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A cleansed mind. The finer aspects of life will be evident to us all.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Oh, divinity!</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Celestial, terrestrial paradise.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">In reverence and respect,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">we honour HAMMAM BOUQUET, 1872</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">with SAVOY STEAM, 2017.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A compliment to time passed.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Originating from a true original.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Inspired by the inspiring baths from which Penhaligon&rsquo;s</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">fragrance first found inspiration.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A steam-mist of fresh roses.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The stir of floating petals.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Hints of invigorating green in with the haze of this olfactory Hammam.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And now, green geranium, aromatic inflexions.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">An echo! rosemary and pink pepper.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And le denouement !, as if after a soothing rub down,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">benzoin and incense reinforce the smooth sensation of warm,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">enveloping, floral steam.</span></div> 0 Turkish Rose Extracts https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/turkish-rose-extracts/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/turkish-rose-extracts/#comments Thurs, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/turkish-rose-extracts/ From rose essence with a sweet and fruity scent similar to jams and flavoured honey, to rose absolute a spicier scent with a heavier rose note From rose essence with a sweet and fruity scent similar to jams and flavoured honey, to rose absolute a spicier scent with a heavier rose note<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_484.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Rose was possibly the first flower from which an essential oil was ever distilled back in 10thC Persia.&nbsp;However, it is still extremely difficult to produce oils from rose petals.<br /> Through extraction, we are able to make three different scents that vary in their likeness to fresh rose. From rose essence, with a sweet and fruity scent similar to jam and flavoured honey, to rose absolute, a spicier scent with a heavier rose note, to rose essential, an opulent scent with hints of each part of the rose coming through, rose petal and crisp green.<br /> <br /> To produce essential oils, roses are harvested when the flower is in half-bloom. At this point the flower has a higher yield and creates a finer fragrance. Rose blooms are harvested at sunrise and processed the same day to prevent fermentation.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Rose Essence</strong><br /> Rose petals are mixed with water in a large copper still and heated. The heat causes the water and petals to evaporate. This vapour is collected and condensed and for collection, as rose oil is lighter in density than water the two fluids form separate layers and the rose oil can be collected from the top. The remaining water is then redistilled; this releases extra fractions of the roses which are soluble in water. These final fractions are responsible for the majority of the scent of rose oils. Rose Essence is light yellow in colour and remains a liquid at room temperature.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Rose Absolute (Rose Concrete)</strong><br /> To create Rose Absolute, roses are placed in an extractor along with solvents. The flowers are washed with the solvent, to remove the aromatic components found in rose petals. The solvent is then removed from the floral solution. Finally, liquid is filtered; the product of this is a waxy liquid known as rose concrete.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Alcohol is added to the concrete to separate much of the wax from the olfactory elements. The alcohol is evaporated off, leaving behind a deep red viscous liquid, Rose absolute.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Rose Essential</strong><br /> Containing all of the olfactory components of a rose in bloom, Rose Essential is created using a combination of rose oil extractions such as distillation and steam stripping. Steam stripping makes it easier to obtain the aroma of rose at a lower temperature. This ensures the blooms do not begin to decompose and the natural scent is not altered.<br /> <br /> Combining this process with resin extraction and water distillation results in the scent closest to the natural scent of a rose. The fragrance consists of green, floral notes, sweet rose petals and the crisp scent of a fresh cut rose. &nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 Little Known London - The Secret History of Gin https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/#comments Thurs, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/ As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff. As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_464.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> We&#39;ve explored the delightful tastes of Maltby Street Market, sampled our oldest street food, taken a ride on chocolates historical Ferris wheel all washed down with a pint of Guinness. In the final installement of our tasty journey we find ourselves surrounded by the distinctive aroma of gin at The City of London Distillery...<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Nestled on the edge of the City of London is something smelly. A few steps from Ludgate Circus and in the shadow of the beautiful St Bride&rsquo;s Church is a secret doorway where a most unusual smell is emanating. There are many clues as to what the smell might be and what secrets might be held inside. For all budding Poirots and Marples out there, you will note the gin bottles and the sign with the acronym COLD on the outside of this entrance. There is even a black cat and a print of Hogarth&rsquo;s Gin Lane, a stark reminder of gin&rsquo;s less glamorous times and maybe their version of reminding you to drink responsibly!<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Secret_History_of_Gin.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; margin-left: 2px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" />As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff. It is an unusual smell and not one that most people can put their finger on immediately, however, if you are a fan of gin, you will no doubt recognize that this is a distillery and the smell you are encountering is a heady mix of gin and a selection of botanicals including gin&rsquo;s magic ingredient, juniper berries. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br /> Juniper is an evergreen and the berries are not officially berries, but we are not going into that now! The smell of this essential ingredient is as intoxicating as the drink itself. It is a contradictory combination of sweet matched with bitter notes. It is fresh but at the same time, warm and the resinous pine edge of the juniper gives it a slightly medicinal quality &ndash; like being hugged by matron!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/The_Secret_History_of_Gin.jpg" style="text-align: center; width: 602px; height: 367px;" /><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The further you walk into the bar, the better everything gets. The large copper stills represent a little bit of history in the making. This is the first gin distillery to be built within the City of London limits for over 220 years. I doubt London in the early 18<sup>th</sup> Century smelt this good but with the estimated number of stills being over 1,000, you could only hope!</span><br /> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Around the room, you will see the bottles and jars containing some but not all of the precious ingredients; coriander seeds, licorice, angelica, orris root and other spices. Each of the five different gins created here is served with a slice of fruit that will highlight and enhance their unique botanicals. Do not be surprised to find your gin and tonic decorated with a slice of melon, pink grapefruit or even rosemary. These adornments not only look lovely but as you go in for your first sip, they will enhance&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">the taste of your chosen gin.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></div> <br /> The City of London Distillery - <a href="http://www.cityoflondondistillery.com">http://www.cityoflondondistillery.com</a><br /> 22-24 Bride Lane<br /> London EC4Y 8DT<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - A Day out in Chiswick https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/#comments Tues, 21 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Charlotte https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/ Stop into ‘The Old Cinema’; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors’ items. Stop into ‘The Old Cinema’; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors’ items.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_474.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:12px;">Meet the Penhaligon&rsquo;s staff, working throughout our stately home and company,<br /> with a wealth of knowledge beyond the ins and outs of the esteemed Portrait&rsquo;s Family.<br /> <br /> Allow the staff to guide you through the streets of London, delve into fragrance and instil proper Penhaligon&rsquo;s dinner party etiquette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Chiswick, one of the hidden gems of London has a rich history, attractive period properties, green space and a vibrant mix of shops and restaurants. Chiswick gets its name from the Old English for &lsquo;cheese farm&rsquo; and was a former fishing village. Now it is the perfect area for those who want the advantages of the capital but not the hustle or bustle, making it popular with young families.<br /> <br /> <img src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 339px;" /><br /> <br /> We started our day at Fuller&rsquo;s Brewery, London&rsquo;s largest and oldest brewery and made our way to the Thames footpath. Along the river, are beautiful and large period houses, and an amazing houseboat! The Old Ship is the perfect pub to stop for a drink and watch the very active (and brave!) people sailing or kayaking on the River Thames.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Moving onto Chiswick High Road,<img align="right" height="282" hspace="12" src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day_2.jpg" width="350" /><br /> where you will find the majority of shops and restaurants. Stop into &lsquo;The Old Cinema&rsquo;; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors&rsquo; items.&nbsp; Next door is High Road House, part of the Soho House Group, and the perfect spot for lunch. Not to worry if you aren&rsquo;t a member, the brasserie downstairs is just as good. If you fancy a coffee, down a little street is &lsquo;Chief&rsquo; that serves great artisan coffee and for some fun - a pinball lounge downstairs! Or if you go in summer ice cream at Foubert&rsquo;s is a must, often quoted as the best ice cream in<br /> London.<br /> <br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day_3.png" style="width: 602px; height: 283px;" /><br /> <br /> You cannot visit Chiswick without going to Chiswick House, a beautiful neo-Palladian villa set in 65 acres of land and built by Lord Burlington in 1729. At the time we visited, it was the &lsquo;Magical Lantern Festival&rsquo; with spectacular illuminated outdoor installations. The lanterns were spread throughout the garden, celebrating Chinese New Year and the theme was &lsquo;explore the silk road&rsquo;. There were also food stalls, rides and even an ice bar (warning freezing inside!). This festival is nearing an end but there are always lots of activities going on and it&rsquo;s a beautiful place to go for a walk during the day.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 Savoy Steam - The Brand Story https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/#comments Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/ It was once upon a time. Not Quite such a very long time ago. About 146 years. William was a barber. Penhaligon was his name. It was once upon a time. Not Quite such a very long time ago. About 146 years. William was a barber. Penhaligon was his name.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_466.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">It was once upon a time.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Not Quite such a very long time ago.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">About 146 years.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">William was a barber.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Penhaligon was his name.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">He had left behind his Cornish sea, taken a train and before long was hanging the sign with his name above the new barber&rsquo;s shop on Jermyn Street.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">PENHALIGON&rsquo;S.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The street was popular amongst gentlemen&rsquo;s tailor&rsquo;s and William was trimming beards within sight of Gieves &amp; Hawkes and the clip-clop of horse hooves.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">(Terribly convenient, Jermyn Street in Mayfair was on the way to one&rsquo;s Club as one left The House.*)</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But what moved him the most were the infusions.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The London and Provincial Turkish Bath Co. was modern, most exotic.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And in the very same building.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">You see as he whistled and lathered and made polite conversation, the vapours from the esteemed building downstairs slid under the door.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Day after day they inspired and relaxed him.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">They became a part of his existence until this inspiration spilled into something that still</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">TODAY brings us joy&hellip;.</span><br /> <br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">*Houses of Parliament</span></div> 0 Duchess Rose: The Cocktail https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/#comments Tues, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Lucy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/ A refreshing cocktail with a subtle sweetness A refreshing cocktail with a subtle sweetness<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_422.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><strong>The Duchess Rose&nbsp;</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 40 ml Bloom gin<br /> 20 ml Rose syrup<br /> 15 ml lemon juice<br /> 40 ml Fentiman&rsquo;s tonic/light tonic top<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Method: S+S without tonic top then<br /> Glass: Bloom balloon small<br /> Garnish: Edible flower</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Language of Flowers: Jasmine https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/#comments Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/ It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati. It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_462.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Taking meaning from the physical characteristics and behaviour of flowers, Victorian floriography made it possible to show your pure emotions, with a sense of decorum.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Continuing on our journey through the language of flowers, we look at Jasmine.<br /> It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati. The contentment shown in Jasmine blooms mirrors the relationship of lovers, friends, and family, with a true connection of souls.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Amazing Grace. Contentment and joy!<br /> What is love without happiness? Signify that contentment is a precious thing.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/">Luna</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/oud-de-nil-eau-de-parfum/">Oud de Nil</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/">Lothair</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Language of Flowers: Lily of the Valley https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/#comments Weds, 08 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/ There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love. There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_463.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Often in history flowers were used to send secret messages to one&rsquo;s love. With floral dictionaries, in hand, Victorian England was able to express deep feelings while maintaining proper British etiquette.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> We finish our language of flowers journey with Lily of the Valley.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love. To shy, the Lily did not speak out, and the Nightingale left the wood. Grief-stricken, the lily of the valley would not come into bloom until the day her loved returned.<br /> A bouquet of lily of the valley signifies refound happiness, proclaiming joy has returned to your life or a fated love never truly left.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Paradise Regained. Happiness Returned. Lovers Reunited.<br /> Oh, the joy of being together again at last. Tell a significant person that their presence is a daily present.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lily-of-the-valley-eau-de-toilette/">Lily of the Valley</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/">Gardenia</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/artemisia-eau-de-parfum/">Artemisia</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Language of Flowers: Lavender https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/#comments Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/ The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself. The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_461.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">In the Victorian era, small floral bouquets, known as talking bouquets, were gifted as tokens of love, expressing feelings that could not be spoken in public.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself, during this period. Often paired with the crisp scent of other mints and herbs, their distinctive fragrances were said to bring luck and expressed strong commitment.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Devotion. &hellip; and mystery!! Oh! tell me are you True?<br /> A declaration of studied interest. When the suitors are numerous and the stakes high! I will wait until the end of time&hellip; well, at least a few weeks.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blenheim-bouquet-eau-de-toilette/">Blenheim Bouquet</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/no33-eau-de-cologne/">No.33</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lavandula-eau-de-parfum/">Lavandula</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Roaring Radcliff https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/#comments Weds, 01 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/ Gloriously, decadently mischievous — some would say entitled, but they’d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun. Lord George’s secret son — some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh) Gloriously, decadently mischievous — some would say entitled, but they’d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun. Lord George’s secret son — some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh)<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_458.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Being secretly the son of Lord George and Clandestine Clara certainly explains Radcliff&#39;s weakness for the flesh, but his illegitimacy may have its advantages. Unburdened by title or propriety, Radcliff indulges in fast cars and even faster women - his raison d&rsquo;&ecirc;tre parties and provocation. A prominent note with Roaring Radcliff is of course tobacco - strong, smoky and distinctive to his set. He also always carries with him gingerbread - adding its sweet spiciness to his father&rsquo;s love of liquor - in Radcliff&#39;s rum. Sexy and rebellious - what well-bred girl would not succumb to his charm? As he is wont to whisper in their inclining ears&hellip; The night is young&hellip;</span> <h2> <br /> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Roaring Radcliff</span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Gloriously, decadently mischievous &mdash; some would say entitled,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">but they&rsquo;d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Lord George&rsquo;s secret son &mdash; some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh)</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">enjoys: Fun without responsibility. Freedom without a badge. Money without obligation.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Fast cars, and even faster women, Radcliff has it all.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Until one day, when he will have nothing. Until then, anyone for a round of poker?</span></span><br /> <br /> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Delectable decadence.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Extroverts can also be intriguing. Late nights have a perfume of their own. When</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">freedom feels provocative and the party has a certain jive, a warm, soft aromatic &mdash; with</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">honeyed tobacco &mdash; shoots a sexy breeze. This fragrance beckons pleasure and also has</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">a mind of its own.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Living in the moment requires a certain endeavour &mdash; dedication is always a</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">plus &mdash; and we are all, more or less willing students of that marvellous School called Life.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">AMBERY TOBACCO</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Rum - Tobacco - Ginger Bread</span></div> </div> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0