The Penhaligon's Times https://www.penhaligons.com Tues, 28 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT https://www.penhaligons.com en hourly 1 Little Known London - Kaspar The Cat https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/#comments Fri, 24 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-kaspar-the-cat/ In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form. In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_489.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">In the lobby of the Savoy is a black cat; he sits aloof observing the to-ing and fro-ing of hotel guests and front of house staff. He is unnoticed by many who come to stay but those in the know can walk over and observe his fine form. He will not respond as he is made of wood, sculpted out of a piece of London Plane tree. He sits upright with a glorious tail that looks almost as if he has a handle! Very occasionally, he is moved from his front of house vantage and is taken to one of the many restaurants and private dining rooms of the hotel. He has a very important role. This dashing black cat joins diners when there is a table of 13. He will sit discreetly beside his table setting, a reminder of a rather sad and unfortunate incident that took place in 1898.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Early in that year, a guest of the Savoy, Woolf Joel, held a dinner for friends in the Pinafore Room. On the evening itself, a last minute cancellation meant that the booking was now for 13 people. This caused much discussion about the superstition associated with the unlucky number including the myth that the first person to leave a table of 13 would be the first to die. Joel, being the consummate host, and probably not superstitious, left the table ahead of his guests. On his subsequent return to Johannesburg just a few weeks later, he was shot dead.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Savoy and much of London society heard this shocking news - not the best PR for this new hotel! Arrangements were made for any future tables of this unlucky number to be accompanied by a fourteenth &lsquo;guest&rsquo;.&nbsp; This was a member of the Savoy staff who sat amongst the unlucky others. He must have felt like a spare part trying not to listen in to the stilted conversation of the other diners who were desperately trying to ignore him!&nbsp; A more permanent solution came about in 1926. The architect, Basil Ionides, a leading force in the Art Moderne (Art Deco) movement, sculpted a black cat named Kaspar. He became the hotel&rsquo;s mascot and amused such guests as Winston Churchill as he dined within the hotel with fellow members of &ldquo;The Other Club&rdquo;. Winston was such a big fan that when he heard that Kaspar had been &lsquo;abducted&rsquo; during a moment of high jinx during WWII, he allegedly saw to Kaspar&rsquo;s safe return.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">To be continued...</span></span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Savoy Court https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/#comments Weds, 22 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-savoy-court/ This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out... This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_490.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Everything about the Savoy is grand, from its dramatic Art Deco fa&ccedil;ade to the illuminated Savoy sign. The only way to arrive at this hotel is by taxi cabriolet or if you are lucky, one of the Savoy&rsquo;s own Rolls Royce, via the short but significant road that leads up from The Strand to the liveried doormen waiting for you. You are entering the beautiful Savoy; the grand dame of London&rsquo;s hotels, one of the most historic and well respected in the world.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is a unique hotel on many levels and its history is fascinating but if you look closely there is one thing that really makes The Savoy stand out - Savoy Court. &nbsp;This little street is the only place in the UK where you drive on the right hand side of the road. You are probably wondering why this is. Firstly, Savoy Court is privately owned and thereby is not governed by the UK&rsquo;s traffic regulations. Secondly, it was done for practical reasons. To understand this, I will take you back to 1904 when the road was incorporated into the Strand extension of the hotel. Imagine a horse-drawn carriage approaching the hotel, the driver seated on the right and a dignitary or a lady sat behind him. This was the respectable way to travel. As the carriage approached the hotel on the right hand side of the road, the door could be opened allowing them to walk straight into the hotel.&nbsp; It was easier to make this small change to the road than to make all carriage and subsequent cars shift the placement of their respected guests riding in the cars.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is still in practice today. As your knowledgeable cab driver approaches the hotel, your door will be opened by one of the doormen and you can make your own version of an entrance in to the hotel. Imagine the indignity of having a doorman run around the car to open the door on the roadside or worse still, having to open the door yourself and step out, potentially risking a contretemps with another driver &ndash; its just not the done thing!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Savoy Steam Story https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/#comments Mon, 20 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-story/ A marbled hall of redemption. Vaulted ceilings to uplift one’s spirit. Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe. A marbled hall of redemption. Vaulted ceilings to uplift one’s spirit. Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_467.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">HAMMAM BOUQUET, the very first PENHALIGON&rsquo;S fragrance!</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A marbled hall of redemption.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Vaulted ceilings to uplift one&rsquo;s spirit.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Here, the very finest Turkish baths in Europe.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">So between the tiresome chores of reading the paper and being measured for a new suit, a gentleman could take a steam bath and attend to his Toilette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But now here&rsquo;s the surprise.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A woman could too.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Come, come, this way, 12 Duke of York Street is the address.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Round the corner - in time and place.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A haven, a hammam, a hiatus from the grey and the grime.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Exclusively for the fairer sex.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Opening its doors from the first years of the 20th century. One of the first you see. Because whilst the original steam baths had included a women&rsquo;s room the tiresome constraints of finance and planning had thwarted Mr Penhaligon&rsquo;s original dream.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But like all dreams married to conviction,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">the doors have opened. It is 1910.</span></div> 0 #ScentMemories - Adrian https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/#comments Thurs, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Adrian https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-adrian/ Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those "discussions" of years past still looming over the tree lot. Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those "discussions" of years past still looming over the tree lot.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_493.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-size:13px;">As we move onto day five of our #ScentMemories journey, we are taken to family Christmas in New York with Penhaligon&#39;s own Adrian Copeland.</span><br /> <br /> Every holiday season I look forward to our yearly outing to find the &quot;perfect&quot; Christmas tree.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Growing up in NYC, and in an Italian-Irish family, the yearly &#39;enjoyable&#39; family outing was also the cause of many a &#39;family discussion&#39;. This conversation between my parents would always transpire in the middle of the tree lot. My mom would always want a &quot;Symmetrically Perfect&quot; tree with equal amounts of blue and green needles. My father only had one requirement in a tree- &ldquo;it had to be BIG&quot;. &nbsp;Hence the start of each year&rsquo;s &lsquo;family outing&rsquo; ultimately became that year&rsquo;s topic for discussion at Christmas dinner with the entire extended family clan.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">This family tradition goes back to my childhood, both the search for the tree and the ensuing &#39;discussions&#39;.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Each year as the month of December approached, I anxiously await my first smell of the cut evergreen trees in the air, and to hear the faint whispers of all those &quot;discussions&quot; of years past still looming over the tree lot.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Magically, I am transported back in time to all those Christmas past and the wonderful memories of finding the &quot;perfect tree: and the yearly &ldquo;dinner table discussions&quot; of my family.</span></div> 0 #ScentMemories - Juliette https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/#comments Thurs, 16 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Juliette https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-juliette/ Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart. Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_492.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <em>Master Perfumer and creator of <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/savoy-steam/">Savoy Steam</a>, Juliette Karagueuzoglou recounts #ScentMemories from&nbsp;her childhood and parenthood.</em><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">It&rsquo;s really hard to choose among my memories since they are so closely related to emotions&hellip; each one reminds me beautiful and specific moments and people.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>My children:</strong> It sounds like a clich&eacute; but it&rsquo;s so true! I cannot start without mention my perfect memory of my children&rsquo;s smell. This so intense attachment between mother and child through scents is like an animal instinct that connects me most to the animals we are&hellip; Their smell changes and is like I could really smell it again: from the warm and soft milk smell around their lips and the cute gruyere cheese smell of their lovely baby feet to the more persistent smells when they are children. These smells are not always good, I know, but it reminds us of our animality and I love it. It&rsquo;s extremely important for me; I cannot imagine a world without human smells. I would have loved to capture these smells during my children first months but, failing that, I&rsquo;m glad to have it engraved in my memory.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>At Home:</strong> It&rsquo;s about the daily life that I remember best. I have so sweet memories of my childhood&hellip; my sun-warmed skin, smelling like a biscuit! My parent&rsquo;s fragrances that I could smell when they woke me up in the morning (very aromatic notes for my father who worn Drakkar Noir during years and years). The slightly bitter and tenacious smell of the dark chocolate that my parents used to eat in the evening, just before hugging me when I went to bed. Little girl, I always knew who were coming to have dinner with us at home thanks to the fragrance my parent&rsquo;s friends worn, I could recognize them once they removed they coats. It&#39;s funny: I still associate them to the fragrances they worn at that time, although most of them have already changed it.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Juliette_Karagueuzoglou.jpg" style="width: 235px; height: 329px; float: right;" /><br /> <strong>During Holidays:</strong> Summer smells, the concrete after the warm storm, wet and dusty at the same time. The Landes forest&#39;s resinous yet fresh smell of sun-warmed pines announcing the beginning of the holidays after 7 hours on the road&hellip; The rainy mornings at my grandmother&rsquo;s house and the hedge box in her garden.&nbsp; The solar and salty breeze on the way to go to the beach where, just before the sand dune, we already had a foretaste of the ocean.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>School time:</strong> Such a nice time! I can feel it again through my scented memories: the lindens of the court, the wet sponge to clear the chalk from the blackboard, the pencil sharpener, the odors of glue and painting. And, of course, the cooking smell that I immediately recognized after pushing the door, back from the school.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> And so much more! Odors are very successful in their power of evocation for everyone. We have all received the world through our sense of smell and it remains forever in our mind and heart.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 #ScentMemories - Thomas https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/#comments Weds, 15 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Thomas https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-thomas/ Whilst Iris Prima is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it’s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss! Whilst Iris Prima is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it’s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_491.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 13px;">Day three of our trip down #ScentMemories Lane. Thomas Dunckley (or The Candy Perfume Boy) tells us of his love of all things Penhaligon&rsquo;s. Thomas is a self-proclaimed Perfume Addict and runs a Jasmine Award winning perfume blog that chronicles his obsession with fragrance&hellip;.</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Seeing as Penhaligon&rsquo;s have been the purveyors of fine British perfumery since 1870, many Brits have found themselves holding at least one scented memory linked to a classic or modern scent from the house of Penhaligon&rsquo;s and I am certainly no exception. I&rsquo;ve always been drawn to the cheeky and eccentric style of Penhaligon&rsquo;s - a style that is sometimes mischievous and always quintessentially British. So many of their fragrances have been with me at important parts of my life over the last ten years, whether that be at my graduation <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/vaara-eau-de-parfum/">(Vaara)</a></u>&nbsp;or pivotal job interviews (you can never go wrong with <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/sartorial-eau-de-toilette/">Sartorial</a></u>, ever). Here are just three of my favourite Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrances and the scent memories I associate with them.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">My very first Penhaligon&rsquo;s scent was Amaranthine, which at the time of launch was something quite scandalous indeed, evoking the warm skin of the inner thigh with its strange condensed milk note and overdose of tropical white flowers. My experience with it is less x-rated and for me, Amaranthine&rsquo;s tropical blooms, which are somewhere between the fresh banana tones of ylang ylang and the comfort of warm milk, will always be a warm wintry accompaniment that took the edge off the harshest of winter chills. At one point in time my scarf never stopped smelling of Amaranthine and whenever I catch a whiff of it, I think of winter.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">One of the most evocative fragrances ever created by Penhaligon&rsquo;s is the remarkable Ostara - an ode to the daffodil from bud to bloom. Smelling Ostara the key impression is, unsurprisingly, of daffodils but I&rsquo;m reminded of childhood times playing in my garden with my brothers and sisters. Ostara evokes sunshine and flowers but also cool earth and roots. It&rsquo;s an optimistic fragrance that speaks of those carefree summer days that felt endless and where grass stains and mud pies were never a bad thing.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance that boasts the most potent scent memory for me is most definitely <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/">Iris Prima</a></u>&nbsp;and not because I wore it at a particular time or place. Whilst <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/">Iris Prima</a></u>&nbsp;is inspired by the ballet, it takes me right back to my childhood and time spent sat on hard wooden floors during school assemblies. For me it&rsquo;s the scent of knobbly knees exposed against the sweet dusty flooring and the soft warmth of grey school jumpers. Ahh, it is pure bliss!</span></span></span></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/categories/IRISPRIMA_blog_candy.jpg" /></span></span></span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;">There really is a Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance for every occasion and every memory and I very much look forward to making new ones with some of the brand&rsquo;s more recent offerings. Hmmm, that reminds me, I have a date with the <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/much-ado-about-the-duke-eau-de-parfum/">Duke</a></u> that I must get to&hellip;<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <strong><a href=" https://thecandyperfumeboy.com/" target="_blank"> Read more from The Candy Perfume Boy here.</a></strong></span></span></span></span></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 #ScentMemories - Alex Lee https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/#comments Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-alex-lee/ I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her. I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_488.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Born in California, Alex was fascinated by scents as a child, chasing girls on the playground to smell their deliciously shampooed hair. Progressively, he developed a passion for fragrances and began to collect perfume bottles. During his studies for a career in medicine, Alex realized that the evocative nature of perfume served as a form of emotional medicine. In 2008, he was admitted in the Grasse Institute of Perfumery.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In 2013, Alex was the winner of the young perfumer competition &quot;The Scent of Esxence - 5 Years of Excellence&quot;</span></span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">When I decided to pursue perfumery in France, I knew I had to speak French. I left California and started my journey by learning the language in Lyon.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I remember taking the Lyonnais subway to return to my host family after a day of classes. Sitting across from me, I saw a woman who seemed to be having a bad day. I did not want to be rude, but I felt compelled to engage her and I offered her a sample of Guerlain&rsquo;s Shalimar. She sprayed the perfume on the top of her hand and smelled it. The most amazing thing happened: she smiled! During the entire trip, she held her hand close to her nose. On her face, you could almost see a war between the joy and trouble take place. As she got off at her stop, the woman flashed me a smile and whispered, &ldquo;Thank you, thank you very much.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> My childhood dream was to become a doctor to help others. This fragrant memory and others remind me that a perfume has a psychological power to bring out joy, confidence, energy, and intense emotions &ndash; the best out of a person. I am satisfied knowing that perfumery could allow me to heal people but in another way.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 #ScentMemories - Mona https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/#comments Mon, 13 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Monalogue https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/scentmemories-mona/ A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_487.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">At Penhaligon&#39;s we understand the emotive power of scent. It can unlock memories and open doors; it can stop us in our tracks, lost somewhere for a moment in time. Recollections triggered by a dusting of iris, a whisper of clove, a burst of juicy nectarine, a trail of smoky incense, a creamy lick of vanilla.<br /> <br /> Nation Fragrance Day is approaching and in celebration, together with the Fragrance Foundation, we explore #ScentMemories with a series of guest&rsquo;s blogs.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">First Mona a blogger and Instagrammer from Somerset shares her tales of dressing tables full of perfume bottles and her love of Equinox Bloom&hellip;</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">We too often overlook the importance of scent; its presence in our memory is nothing short of astounding. A simple walk past a bakery can temporarily transport you back to that warm summer retreat in France, the perfume of a passerby can make you long for the embrace of a loved one, or even resent a previous unpleasant encounter. Scent takes us on a journey that is for no two people quite the same.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I&rsquo;m probably not alone in saying that my earliest explicit memories of fragrance come from my mother. She had a large collection of perfumes, most of them gifts from my father who travelled a lot. Every few months a new bottle would arrive on her dressing table, a different shape, size and language from the last. When my mother got through the fragrance, she would give me the bottle. Over time I accumulated quite a collection of bottles, and if I were lucky they would contain a few leftover drops for me to savor.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> <br /> <img alt="" img="" src=" /images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Gate_1.png" style="width: 303px; height: 375px; font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px; float: left;" /><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Gate_2.png" style="width: 302px; height: 373px; float: right;" /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <table border="0" cellpadding="10" cellspacing="1" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">As I grew older, my mother started to travel more. When I was fifteen, she returned from Italy with a perfume - for me! It was a sweet floral smell with a hint of vanilla. It was fun and vibrant. It was new. I couldn&rsquo;t have matched that period of my life with a better fragrance if I tried. I stayed out late, I met new people, discovered new things and I fell in love, all the while accompanied by that perfume.</span></span></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Scent_Memory_Equinox_Bloom.JPG" style="width: 300px; height: 400px; font-family: georgia, serif; font-size: 14px; margin-right: 10px; margin-left: 10px; float: right;" /><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Of course, scents don&rsquo;t always allude to pleasant memories. I wen</span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">t through a phase of complicated grief in my late teens after losing my mother unexpectedly. I let my emotions get the better of me in a bereavement group once a week. The air was filled by the scent of the most intrusive of lemongrass air fresheners. Needless to say I have since acquired a strong distaste for the scent of lemongrass.<br /> <br /> Today I am in my mid-twenties. I wear Equinox Bloom. I chose this perfume in a profiling session, simply because I liked it. But perhaps there&rsquo;s more to it than that. Perhaps the base notes of Ambrox and Benzoin Siam take me back to my childhood collection of fragrances from afar. Perhaps the sweet spring floral notes take me back to my carefree teenage days. And perhaps I would have turned my nose at the fragrance were it to contain the slightest hint of lemongrass.</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>Read more from Lifestyle Blogger &amp; Photographer Mona on:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/">http://www.monalogue.co.uk/</a></strong><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Floral Scents Make You Happy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/#comments Fri, 10 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/floral-scents-make-you-happy/ Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood. Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_486.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Certain scents can do amazing things for our mind and body. Not only can they provoke powerful memories they can actually influence your mood. Floral Scents, for example, are scientifically proven to make you feel happier.<br /> <br /> Luckily for you Penhaligon&rsquo;s have a myriad of floral scents to have you walking on air.<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/floral-fragrances/">Floral fragrances</a></u>, the softest and most tender fragrance family, are the height of decorum. Florals can be either &ldquo;soliflores&rdquo;: translations of single flower notes, or &ldquo;bouquets&rdquo;: a blend of floral notes to create a beautiful feminine impression.<br /> <br /> What&rsquo;s more, they don&rsquo;t just increase your own happiness, they can help you boost the spirit of others. Studies have shown the act of stopping to take in the scent of a fresh rose and interaction with your olfactory sensors can increase levels of compassion and kindness towards others.<br /> <br /> Living with flowers and floral stimuli such as scented candles and diffusers, in the home can decrease stress levels and cure Monday moods. <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lavandula-eau-de-parfum/">Lavender</a></u> and camomile, known for their soothing effect on people, are often used to destress. The strong sweet fragrance of <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/">gardenia</a></u> and <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/us/luna-eau-de-toilette/">jasmine</a></u> boosts your mood. These sweet and creamy flowers mimic their natural tropical habitat, passing a blissful mood.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Be Happy! <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/fragrances/">See the full collection</a></u></span></span><br /> 0 Mother’s Day at The Savoy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/#comments Weds, 08 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Charlotte https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/mothers-day-with-penhaligons-and-the-savoy/ Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon’s and The Savoy. Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon’s and The Savoy.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_483.jpg"<br/><br/><div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">In celebration of the upcoming launch of <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/coming-soon/">Savoy Steam</a></u>, we have partnered with The Savoy to offer an exquisite afternoon tea experience this Mother&rsquo;s Day.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Enjoy an afternoon tea experience with Penhaligon&rsquo;s and The Savoy. Share a traditional tea for two in the beautiful Thames Foyer, and receive a stunning Savoy bouquet &amp; a bottle of our new floral fragrance, Savoy Steam Eau de Parfum.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">To make a booking please call the restaurant reservations team on +44 (0)20 7420 2111 between 09:00 to 20:00 BST<br /> <br /> &lsquo;PENHALIGON&rsquo;S&rsquo; must be quoted when booking<br /> <br /> Bookings available from Monday 6th March until Monday 7th August.</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 10px;">Image Credit. Red Photographic.com</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Penhaligon’s x Ayumi Togashi https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/#comments Weds, 01 Mar 2017 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-ayumi-togashi/ We sit down with Paris-based illustrator Ayumi Togashi, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family. We sit down with Paris-based illustrator Ayumi Togashi, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_437.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Since graduating from the&nbsp;Studio Ber&ccedil;ot, in 2003, Japanese-born artist Ayumi Togashi has created prints and illustrations for luxury fashion and perfume houses.&nbsp;We sat down with the Paris-based illustrator, to discuss her artistic journey and influences for the Portraits family.</span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>1. Whe</strong></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>n did you know you wanted to become an artist?</strong><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Ayumi_1.jpg" style="font-size: 14px; width: 251px; height: 335px; float: right; margin: 5px 10px;" /><span style="font-size: 14px;">Ever since I was little I have always enjoyed drawing women. It was when I came to France to study fashion I realised just how much I loved to draw.<br /> <br /> My experiences&nbsp;developed with luxurious fashion&nbsp;companies such as Chlo&eacute;, Sonia Rykiel, Pacorabanne, etc in embroidery, printing and illustration.<br /> <br /> I quickly joined my agent, Kajsa (Agent&amp;Artist)<br /> who I knew from being a student. Kajsa quickly became a good adviser and partner.<br /> <br /> Today my work applies in a range of fields such as mode,&nbsp;packaging,&nbsp;books, short movie, textiles. All these fantastic experiences allow me to continue learning along the way.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>2. What inspires you/what were your earliest influences?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> I&rsquo;ve been always fascinated by attitude and clothes I see in the street.&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>3. Describe your style.</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Childish. Unfinished. Suggestive.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>4. Can you tell us a little about your creative process? How does an idea turn into an illustration &ndash; and how long does it take?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Given a subject, I develop inspirations and imaginations during walks down the street. Briefings and hints are everywhere. I like sketching at the coffee terrace. A first sketch is sometimes enough, sometimes they need to be reworked.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br /> <strong>5. When did you first discover Penhaligon&rsquo;s.</strong><br /> <br /> I discovered Penhaligon&#39;s walking in Paris. I was drawn to the traditional Britishness of the bottles.&nbsp;<br /> <strong>&nbsp;</strong></span><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>6. Do you have a favourite Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> All of them are classic and elegant. Luna is my favourite.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>7. What inspiration did you take from the characters?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Mostly english, traditional, high&nbsp;society families.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>8. What&rsquo;s your favourite character/fragrance?</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Lord George is my favourite member of the portrait family, I think his fragrance really matches his&nbsp;personality.<br /> &nbsp;</span> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>9. If you could be one of the Portraits characters, who would you be<br /> and&nbsp;</strong></span><strong style="font-size: 14px;">why?</strong></div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The Duke, because his character and scent are very seductive.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src=" /images/blogs/Ayumi_2.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 602px;" /></span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <div> <br /> To see more of Ayumi&rsquo;s illustrations visit <u><strong><a href="http://agentandartists.com/artists/ayumi-togashi/">http://agentandartists.com/artists/ayumi-togashi/</a></strong></u></div> 0 Savoy Steam Eau de Cologne https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/#comments Tues, 28 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-cologne/ Hallelujah, life alive! Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations. A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness! Hallelujah, life alive! Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations. A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_469.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Hallelujah, life alive!</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Invigorations of joy. Vigorous palpitations.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A deluge of delight. The friction of freshness!</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The wet-plunge, the dry rub-down.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Plunging from heat to cold.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">In steam and water, sensations multiply.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The cooling eucalyptus, and an ambrosial aromatic rosemary ointment</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">shot through with lemon primofiore.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And no less zealous.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Fir balsam and white cedar</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">bring spirited blond traction, that chimes with the</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 60px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Masterful blend of resins &amp; incense.</span></div> 0 Number One Fan https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Alex https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/number-one-fan/ In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams Penhaligon’s Portraits design. What’s more it’s scented! In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams Penhaligon’s Portraits design. What’s more it’s scented!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_485.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">The humble beginnings of the fan can be traced back as far as ancient Egypt, keeping the flies off the Pharaoh. The Japanese are responsible for designing the folding variety and by the time we reached the 16th Century they were being used as a way to discretely communicate to others. Something that really took off in the Victorian era. What a secretive bunch they were! See The Language of Flowers<strong> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers/">here.</a>&nbsp;</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> A beginner&rsquo;s guide to Fan Flirtation:<br /> A very quick fanning movement = &ldquo;I am engaged&rdquo;<br /> A slow fanning movement = &ldquo;I am married&rdquo;<br /> Holding the fan to the lips = &ldquo;Kiss me&rdquo;<br /> Or for something a little more sinister&hellip;<br /> Twirling a fan in the left hand = &ldquo;I wish to be rid of you&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In celebration of our latest launch we have created a beautiful hand held fan printed with the exclusive Krisjana Williams<strong> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/">Penhaligon&rsquo;s Portraits</a></strong>&nbsp;design. What&rsquo;s more it&rsquo;s scented!<br /> And what&rsquo;s more they are back in vogue! Popping up on the Spring/Summer 2017 catwalks. A beautiful summer accessory and self-cooling aid. Not only will you be fashion forward and keeping cool (when summer arrives) but also wafting <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/fragrances/"><strong>beautiful scents</strong></a><strong>&nbsp;</strong>for everyone to admire. And very useful for a little flirting!<br /> One might be lucky enough to still pick one up in store&hellip;<strong><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">pop in and ask!</a></strong></span></span> 0 Savoy Steam Eau De Parfum https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/#comments Mon, 27 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-edp/ And now, today, in PENHALIGON’S most natural habitat. We have retuned. With a fresh demeanour. We will leave with a fresh soul. And now, today, in PENHALIGON’S most natural habitat. We have retuned. With a fresh demeanour. We will leave with a fresh soul.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_468.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">And now, today, in PENHALIGON&rsquo;S most natural habitat.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">We have retuned.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">With a fresh demeanour.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">We will leave with a fresh soul.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A cleansed mind. The finer aspects of life will be evident to us all.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Oh, divinity!</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Celestial, terrestrial paradise.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">In reverence and respect,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">we honour HAMMAM BOUQUET, 1872</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">with SAVOY STEAM, 2017.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A compliment to time passed.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Originating from a true original.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Inspired by the inspiring baths from which Penhaligon&rsquo;s</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">fragrance first found inspiration.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">A steam-mist of fresh roses.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The stir of floating petals.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Hints of invigorating green in with the haze of this olfactory Hammam.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And now, green geranium, aromatic inflexions.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">An echo! rosemary and pink pepper.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And le denouement !, as if after a soothing rub down,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">benzoin and incense reinforce the smooth sensation of warm,</span></div> <div style="text-align: center; margin-left: 80px;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">enveloping, floral steam.</span></div> 0 Little Known London - The Secret History of Gin https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/#comments Thurs, 23 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/secret-history-of-gin/ As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff. As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_464.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> We&#39;ve explored the delightful tastes of Maltby Street Market, sampled our oldest street food, taken a ride on chocolates historical Ferris wheel all washed down with a pint of Guinness. In the final installement of our tasty journey we find ourselves surrounded by the distinctive aroma of gin at The City of London Distillery...<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Nestled on the edge of the City of London is something smelly. A few steps from Ludgate Circus and in the shadow of the beautiful St Bride&rsquo;s Church is a secret doorway where a most unusual smell is emanating. There are many clues as to what the smell might be and what secrets might be held inside. For all budding Poirots and Marples out there, you will note the gin bottles and the sign with the acronym COLD on the outside of this entrance. There is even a black cat and a print of Hogarth&rsquo;s Gin Lane, a stark reminder of gin&rsquo;s less glamorous times and maybe their version of reminding you to drink responsibly!<br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/Secret_History_of_Gin.jpg" style="width: 300px; height: 200px; margin-left: 2px; margin-right: 10px; float: left;" />As you descend the steps into the speakeasy environs of the COLD bar, it is the aroma that greets you first before the friendly bar staff. It is an unusual smell and not one that most people can put their finger on immediately, however, if you are a fan of gin, you will no doubt recognize that this is a distillery and the smell you are encountering is a heady mix of gin and a selection of botanicals including gin&rsquo;s magic ingredient, juniper berries. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br /> Juniper is an evergreen and the berries are not officially berries, but we are not going into that now! The smell of this essential ingredient is as intoxicating as the drink itself. It is a contradictory combination of sweet matched with bitter notes. It is fresh but at the same time, warm and the resinous pine edge of the juniper gives it a slightly medicinal quality &ndash; like being hugged by matron!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/The_Secret_History_of_Gin.jpg" style="text-align: center; width: 602px; height: 367px;" /><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The further you walk into the bar, the better everything gets. The large copper stills represent a little bit of history in the making. This is the first gin distillery to be built within the City of London limits for over 220 years. I doubt London in the early 18<sup>th</sup> Century smelt this good but with the estimated number of stills being over 1,000, you could only hope!</span><br /> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Around the room, you will see the bottles and jars containing some but not all of the precious ingredients; coriander seeds, licorice, angelica, orris root and other spices. Each of the five different gins created here is served with a slice of fruit that will highlight and enhance their unique botanicals. Do not be surprised to find your gin and tonic decorated with a slice of melon, pink grapefruit or even rosemary. These adornments not only look lovely but as you go in for your first sip, they will enhance&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">the taste of your chosen gin.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></div> <br /> The City of London Distillery - <a href="http://www.cityoflondondistillery.com/">http://www.cityoflondondistillery.com</a><br /> 22-24 Bride Lane<br /> London EC4Y 8DT<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - A Day out in Chiswick https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/#comments Tues, 21 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Charlotte https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-a-day-out-in-chiswick/ Stop into ‘The Old Cinema’; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors’ items. Stop into ‘The Old Cinema’; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors’ items.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_474.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:12px;">Meet the Penhaligon&rsquo;s staff, working throughout our stately home and company,<br /> with a wealth of knowledge beyond the ins and outs of the esteemed Portrait&rsquo;s Family.<br /> <br /> Allow the staff to guide you through the streets of London, delve into fragrance and instil proper Penhaligon&rsquo;s dinner party etiquette.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <br /> <span style="font-family:georgia,serif;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Chiswick, one of the hidden gems of London has a rich history, attractive period properties, green space and a vibrant mix of shops and restaurants. Chiswick gets its name from the Old English for &lsquo;cheese farm&rsquo; and was a former fishing village. Now it is the perfect area for those who want the advantages of the capital but not the hustle or bustle, making it popular with young families.<br /> <br /> <img src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day.jpg" style="width: 602px; height: 339px;" /><br /> <br /> We started our day at Fuller&rsquo;s Brewery, London&rsquo;s largest and oldest brewery and made our way to the Thames footpath. Along the river, are beautiful and large period houses, and an amazing houseboat! The Old Ship is the perfect pub to stop for a drink and watch the very active (and brave!) people sailing or kayaking on the River Thames.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Moving onto Chiswick High Road,<img align="right" height="282" hspace="12" src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day_2.jpg" width="350" /><br /> where you will find the majority of shops and restaurants. Stop into &lsquo;The Old Cinema&rsquo;; no longer a cinema but instead a treasure chest of antiques, homewares and collectors&rsquo; items.&nbsp; Next door is High Road House, part of the Soho House Group, and the perfect spot for lunch. Not to worry if you aren&rsquo;t a member, the brasserie downstairs is just as good. If you fancy a coffee, down a little street is &lsquo;Chief&rsquo; that serves great artisan coffee and for some fun - a pinball lounge downstairs! Or if you go in summer ice cream at Foubert&rsquo;s is a must, often quoted as the best ice cream in<br /> London.<br /> <br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img src="/images/blogs/Chiswick_Day_3.png" style="width: 602px; height: 283px;" /><br /> <br /> You cannot visit Chiswick without going to Chiswick House, a beautiful neo-Palladian villa set in 65 acres of land and built by Lord Burlington in 1729. At the time we visited, it was the &lsquo;Magical Lantern Festival&rsquo; with spectacular illuminated outdoor installations. The lanterns were spread throughout the garden, celebrating Chinese New Year and the theme was &lsquo;explore the silk road&rsquo;. There were also food stalls, rides and even an ice bar (warning freezing inside!). This festival is nearing an end but there are always lots of activities going on and it&rsquo;s a beautiful place to go for a walk during the day.<br /> &nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 Savoy Steam - The Brand Story https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/#comments Fri, 17 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/savoy-steam-brand-story/ It was once upon a time. Not Quite such a very long time ago. About 146 years. William was a barber. Penhaligon was his name. It was once upon a time. Not Quite such a very long time ago. About 146 years. William was a barber. Penhaligon was his name.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_466.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">It was once upon a time.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Not Quite such a very long time ago.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">About 146 years.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">William was a barber.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Penhaligon was his name.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">He had left behind his Cornish sea, taken a train and before long was hanging the sign with his name above the new barber&rsquo;s shop on Jermyn Street.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">PENHALIGON&rsquo;S.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The street was popular amongst gentlemen&rsquo;s tailor&rsquo;s and William was trimming beards within sight of Gieves &amp; Hawkes and the clip-clop of horse hooves.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">(Terribly convenient, Jermyn Street in Mayfair was on the way to one&rsquo;s Club as one left The House.*)</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">But what moved him the most were the infusions.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">The London and Provincial Turkish Bath Co. was modern, most exotic.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">And in the very same building.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">You see as he whistled and lathered and made polite conversation, the vapours from the esteemed building downstairs slid under the door.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">Day after day they inspired and relaxed him.</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">They became a part of his existence until this inspiration spilled into something that still</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">TODAY brings us joy&hellip;.</span><br /> <br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">*Houses of Parliament</span></div> 0 Duchess Rose Cocktail https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/#comments Tues, 14 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Lucy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duchess-rose-cocktail/ A refreshing cocktail with a subtle sweetness A refreshing cocktail with a subtle sweetness<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_422.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><strong>The Duchess Rose&nbsp;</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 40 ml Bloom gin<br /> 20 ml Rose syrup<br /> 15 ml lemon juice<br /> 40 ml Fentiman&rsquo;s tonic/light tonic top<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Method: S+S without tonic top then<br /> Glass: Bloom balloon small<br /> Garnish: Edible flower</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Language of Flowers: Jasmine https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/#comments Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-jasmine/ It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati. It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_462.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Taking meaning from the physical characteristics and behaviour of flowers, Victorian floriography made it possible to show your pure emotions, with a sense of decorum.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Continuing on our journey through the language of flowers, we look at Jasmine.<br /> It is believed; Jasmine invokes wisdom and peace and signifies a strong bond. Love expressed with Jasmine goes beyond the love between inamorati. The contentment shown in Jasmine blooms mirrors the relationship of lovers, friends, and family, with a true connection of souls.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Amazing Grace. Contentment and joy!<br /> What is love without happiness? Signify that contentment is a precious thing.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/">Luna</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/oud-de-nil-eau-de-parfum/">Oud de Nil</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/">Lothair</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Language of Flowers: Lily of the Valley https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/#comments Weds, 08 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lily-of-the-valley/ There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love. There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_463.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Often in history flowers were used to send secret messages to one&rsquo;s love. With floral dictionaries, in hand, Victorian England was able to express deep feelings while maintaining proper British etiquette.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> We finish our language of flowers journey with Lily of the Valley.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> There is a legend, the Lily of the Valley fell in love with a nightingale perched on a tree, enchanted by the birdsong, the lily of the valley fell deeply in love. To shy, the Lily did not speak out, and the Nightingale left the wood. Grief-stricken, the lily of the valley would not come into bloom until the day her loved returned.<br /> A bouquet of lily of the valley signifies refound happiness, proclaiming joy has returned to your life or a fated love never truly left.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Paradise Regained. Happiness Returned. Lovers Reunited.<br /> Oh, the joy of being together again at last. Tell a significant person that their presence is a daily present.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lily-of-the-valley-eau-de-toilette/">Lily of the Valley</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/">Gardenia</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/artemisia-eau-de-parfum/">Artemisia</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Language of Flowers: Lavender https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/#comments Fri, 03 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-lavender/ The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself. The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_461.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">In the Victorian era, small floral bouquets, known as talking bouquets, were gifted as tokens of love, expressing feelings that could not be spoken in public.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The original flower of love was the Lavender. Lavender evoked an almost mystical power, comparable to Cupid himself, during this period. Often paired with the crisp scent of other mints and herbs, their distinctive fragrances were said to bring luck and expressed strong commitment.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Meaning:<br /> Devotion. &hellip; and mystery!! Oh! tell me are you True?<br /> A declaration of studied interest. When the suitors are numerous and the stakes high! I will wait until the end of time&hellip; well, at least a few weeks.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/blenheim-bouquet-eau-de-toilette/">Blenheim Bouquet</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/no33-eau-de-cologne/">No.33</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/lavandula-eau-de-parfum/">Lavandula</a></u></span></span></p> 0 Roaring Radcliff https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/#comments Weds, 01 Feb 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/roaring-radcliff/ Gloriously, decadently mischievous — some would say entitled, but they’d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun. Lord George’s secret son — some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh) Gloriously, decadently mischievous — some would say entitled, but they’d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun. Lord George’s secret son — some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh)<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_458.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Being secretly the son of Lord George and Clandestine Clara certainly explains Radcliff&#39;s weakness for the flesh, but his illegitimacy may have its advantages. Unburdened by title or propriety, Radcliff indulges in fast cars and even faster women - his raison d&rsquo;&ecirc;tre parties and provocation. A prominent note with Roaring Radcliff is of course tobacco - strong, smoky and distinctive to his set. He also always carries with him gingerbread - adding its sweet spiciness to his father&rsquo;s love of liquor - in Radcliff&#39;s rum. Sexy and rebellious - what well-bred girl would not succumb to his charm? As he is wont to whisper in their inclining ears&hellip; The night is young&hellip;</span> <h2> <br /> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Roaring Radcliff</span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Gloriously, decadently mischievous &mdash; some would say entitled,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">but they&rsquo;d be wrong. All without the burden of a Title. Jeepers what fun.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Lord George&rsquo;s secret son &mdash; some would say illegitimate (but that seems harsh)</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">enjoys: Fun without responsibility. Freedom without a badge. Money without obligation.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Fast cars, and even faster women, Radcliff has it all.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Until one day, when he will have nothing. Until then, anyone for a round of poker?</span></span><br /> <br /> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Delectable decadence.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Extroverts can also be intriguing. Late nights have a perfume of their own. When</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">freedom feels provocative and the party has a certain jive, a warm, soft aromatic &mdash; with</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">honeyed tobacco &mdash; shoots a sexy breeze. This fragrance beckons pleasure and also has</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">a mind of its own.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Living in the moment requires a certain endeavour &mdash; dedication is always a</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">plus &mdash; and we are all, more or less willing students of that marvellous School called Life.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">AMBERY TOBACCO</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Rum - Tobacco - Ginger Bread</span></div> </div> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Language of Flowers: Rose https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-rose/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-rose/#comments Fri, 27 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Natalie https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers-rose/ Floriography, or the language of flowers, was a Victorian means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages. Floriography, or the language of flowers, was a Victorian means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_460.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family:georgia,serif;">Floriography, or the language of flowers, was a Victorian means of communication in which various flowers and floral arrangements were used to send coded messages. The Victorian period ushered in a time of proper etiquette in England, and there were expected behaviours that prohibited outright conversations. Flowers quickly increased in popularity as a way to communicate discretely to others. Each specific flower had a different message behind it as did the ribbon&nbsp;that tied them together or the manner by which the bouquet was worn.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Language of Flowers Meaning:<br /> <br /> Love, Immediately. Because time is of the essence.<br /> Love at first, second, third sight&hellip;declare your intentions with a single stem.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrances:<br /> <u><a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/the-coveted-duchess-rose-eau-de-parfum/">Duchess Rose</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/much-ado-about-the-duke-eau-de-parfum/">Much ado about the Duke</a><br /> <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/">Halfeti</a></u></span></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> 0 The Language of Flowers https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers/#comments Tues, 24 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/language-of-flowers/ Whilst we don&rsquo;t like to gossip it would appear that there was a &lsquo;mistake&rsquo; and the flowers from Lord George, faithful to King and country, meant for Lady Blanche, well they seem to have been sent to the divine Clandestine Clara Whilst we don&rsquo;t like to gossip it would appear that there was a &lsquo;mistake&rsquo; and the flowers from Lord George, faithful to King and country, meant for Lady Blanche, well they seem to have been sent to the divine Clandestine Clara<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_459.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Some things are unutterable and secret. Other thoughts are are so hard to say&hellip;<br /> <br /> Thank Heavens for the coded art of flowers. A mysterious language - of love?<br /> <br /> Cryptic communications, secret assignations, hidden revelations, coded declarations! Floriography. Oh! what a gift! Quel cadeau.<br /> <br /> What could be more elegant than a bouquet of flowers!<br /> And yet, the perfume of intrigue lingers&hellip;<br /> <br /> Whilst we don&rsquo;t like to gossip it would appear that there was a &lsquo;mistake&rsquo; and the flowers from Lord George, faithful to King and country, meant for Lady Blanche, well they seem to have been sent to the divine Clandestine Clara&hellip;.<br /> <br /> It is true that with Penhaligon&rsquo;s Floriography indiscrete messages can be relayed between sweethearts, paramours, sugar peas - but what could be more (ah-em) improbable!<br /> <br /> When every flower tells a (cloaked) message, it is possible to compose poetry!, to send a surreptitious wink of the eye, or to convey strong feelings with a studied nonchalance. (sigh) If only one could always say it with flowers.<br /> <br /> To commemorate the launch of Portraits Chapter II, the &ldquo;unofficial&rdquo; side of Lord George&rsquo;s family, we are revisiting The Language of Flowers, where each flower and the ribbons that tied them, conveyed a very specific, often secret, meaning. Just in time for Valentine&#39;s Day!<br /> <br /> To be continued...</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Roaring Radcliff https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-roaring-radcliff/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-roaring-radcliff/#comments Weds, 18 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-roaring-radcliff/ Radcliff likes to seduce the ladies who are enjoying the release of Victorian restraints. His rebel charm mesmerizes these hapless ladies allowing them to think that for just a few hours that maybe marriage is not a bad thing after all! The night is young Radcliff likes to seduce the ladies who are enjoying the release of Victorian restraints. His rebel charm mesmerizes these hapless ladies allowing them to think that for just a few hours that maybe marriage is not a bad thing after all! The night is young<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_379.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Quite frankly, Radcliff can hang out exactly anywhere he chooses. He has a car and will be found most of the time at the RAC club talking with like-minded men whose love of cars bonds them all. This is the future; the car makes London look modern and it is so easy to get from Chelsea to Mayfair and St James&rsquo;s to Bloomsbury and back home without all the fuss.<br /> <br /> Radcliff would much rather spend time with the new crowd who are moving into Bloomsbury. This is just the most intriguing of areas; it has culture, respectability and a new found decadence.<br /> <br /> Each of its garden squares is framed by dramatic townhouses taking us back to Bloomsbury&rsquo;s Georgian heyday. The area became one of the places the elite of the City of London moved to after the Great Fire of London. Upwind of all the bad smells of the Square Mile, it was literally a breath of fresh air for those who could afford to leave the confines of the city and escape to this new urban paradise. It is perfectly placed between the financial district and the inns of courts and law courts that dominate the area to the south. Museums, including the monumental British Museum and colleges, including UCL and the University of London, flourished here and Royal Societies abound.<br /> <br /> Radcliff will never be seen in the British Museum or similar highbrow establishments however, it is slowly becoming known for wild parties that would make the ladies of Mayfair blush. It is also being frequented by free thinkers and radicals which Racliff loves if only to scare his father. Radcliff likes to seduce the ladies who are enjoying the release of Victorian restraints. His rebel charm mesmerizes these hapless ladies allowing them to think that for just a few hours that maybe marriage is not a bad thing after all! However, he is soon in his car ready to whisk off to Chelsea or Haymarket to see where else he can cast his net.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Clandestine Clara https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-clandestine-clara/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-clandestine-clara/#comments Tues, 17 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-clandestine-clara/ Soho was definitely not the sort of area where respectable ladies hung out and that is exactly why Clara loved it. As soon as you cross over the social divide of Regent Street from Mayfair, the atmosphere changes. Soho was definitely not the sort of area where respectable ladies hung out and that is exactly why Clara loved it. As soon as you cross over the social divide of Regent Street from Mayfair, the atmosphere changes.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_374.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The fine roads with the reputable shops have gone and the streets are now filled with pubs, bistros and noise. Even a newcomer to London could sense the difference. The little French and Italian eateries of Soho were becoming the places to go; they were more discreet than the dining rooms of Mayfair and no one questioned with whom you were dining. Lord George, very much outside his natural habitat would still enjoy the frisson of the meeting with his mistress. He would often meet with Clara at one of these low-key restaurants, safe in the knowledge that no one would care.<br /> <br /> Soho turned a blind eye towards the antics of the upper classes and also welcomed the struggling artists and writers who were starting to move in.<br /> <br /> The streets and alleyways of Soho held so many secrets and Clara knew most of them. The atmosphere was vibrant but poor, dangerous but strangely comforting. There was an exotic mix of French, Italian, Greek and Jewish immigrants who made some of the finest clothes, silks and food in London. This was such a refreshing change from the English food; it was fresh and seductive.<br /> <br /> On summer evenings, Soho was sultry with the pubs over spilling onto the narrow streets with men wolf-whistling the French Fifi&rsquo;s plying their trade in the doorways and alleys. In the winter, it was comforting with lights coming from the hostelries and the sudden burst of laughter when the doors were opened to let someone in or out.<br /> <br /> Here Clara would meet her friends. These were free spirits who protected their freedom vehemently. This was the start of a new century and this spelt change, whether it came naturally or whether they had to force it along a bit.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Clandestine Clara https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/clandestine-clara/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/clandestine-clara/#comments Mon, 16 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/clandestine-clara/ Tender is the Night, and sometimes the afternoon, for Lord George and Clara his sweet thing, his paramour, his dancing delight, sugar-bee. Tender is the Night, and sometimes the afternoon, for Lord George and Clara his sweet thing, his paramour, his dancing delight, sugar-bee. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_457.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Allow me to present to you the unofficial side of Lord George&rsquo;s dynasty, beginning with - as we have come to know her - Clandestine Clara. And isn&rsquo;t she a complex creature&hellip; A forceful personality, spicy but equally sweet, she has travelled in exotic countries and company - and in her smoky, velvety, woody air you may detect a memory (or three) of his Lordship&hellip; (One would certainly never guess the lady also smokes&hellip;). She is rebellious, contradictory, independent, unconventional - a woman ahead of her time. But above all, as you will discover, she is a true gourmand, completely delectable (and Lord George would know). </span> <h2 style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></h2> <h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Clandestine Clara</span></span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;"><em>Tender is the Night</em>, and sometimes the afternoon, for</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Lord George and Clara his sweet thing, his paramour, his dancing</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">delight, sugar-bee.</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When Clara, Clandestine for obvious reasons, is not &lsquo;purring&rsquo;</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">she can be found behind the wheel of a car, or smoking, or in discussion,</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">or with her colleagues &mdash; all of which are most terribly unsuitable</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">past times for a woman.</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Thank the heavens above she is not a Lady.</span></span></span></div> <div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her Fragrance</span></span></span></h2> <div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Nothing shy here!</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A confident fragrance &mdash; novices need not apply &mdash; progresses</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">in turns into the softest, most heavenly, enduring hug. A</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">conflagration of cuddles, a symphony of skin, the comfort of a negligent</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">warm leg in the night.</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Voluptuous without being overbearing, feminine without</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">being girly, emancipated but without a lack of discipline. A fragrance</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">as life-enhancing as a sexy smile, extravert, likeable, lickable - and all</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">at once. What&rsquo;s not to like?</span></span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A sensual oriental. Indeed.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Intoxicating Amber Oriental</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Rhum Vanilla - Cinnamon Musk - Ambery Patchouli</span></span></div> </div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;</span></div> </div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London - Maltby Street Market https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/maltby-street-market/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/maltby-street-market/#comments Weds, 11 Jan 2017 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/maltby-street-market/ Discover a piece of Little Known London where locals in the know,head for a dizzying array of delicious food and produce tucked away near Tower Bridge Discover a piece of Little Known London where locals in the know,head for a dizzying array of delicious food and produce tucked away near Tower Bridge<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_368.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Just south of Tower Bridge there is a little piece of secret London &ndash; a hidden market. There are no signposts and there are few visual clues. Look closer and you will see a trail of people wandering away into small back roads that lead you towards Bermondsey and into a street market called Maltby Street. You will also recognize the happy faces of people who have sampled the delights of the market and are heading off elsewhere, charmed and satisfied.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Maltby Street" src="/images/blogs/Maltby_Street_3.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 482px;" /><br /> <br /> The first thing you need to know about Maltby Street market is that it is not on Maltby Street! It is on a small, pedestrianized cut-through called Rope Walk between the railway line and Lassco&rsquo;s architectural antiques warehouse. The line runs over a series of railway arches that play host to bars, caf&eacute;s and eateries making this different to the many street food markets that are now popping up all around London. There are stalls selling old favourites including every style of Scotch Egg, a fish smoker who lays out simple open sandwiches with his home smoked salmon topped with mayonnaise and dill and a brewer selling bottles of a new, dry but still distinctly honey-flavoured mead. There are new styles of foods including variations on toasted cheese, falafels, Greek style dips made with beetroot or avocado, simple steak frites, the ubiquitous burger and marinated pork sandwiches. There is enough going on to tickle the taste buds of virtuous vegetarians or confirmed carnivores.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Maltby Street Market" src="/images/blogs/Maltby_Street_1.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 824px;" /><br /> <br /> As you walk into the market area, you are pleasantly hit with a whole host of aromas - delicious wafts of sweet waffles muddle with savoury bacon, fresh juices cutting through grilled cheese. It is sensory overload. The romantics among you will notice the gentle rise of smoke creating a souk-like atmosphere. It is definitely a place where you want to stop and eat. The smells and the sights make it difficult to choose but whatever it is, you are guaranteed something delicious and made with passion. If grabbing food on the go is not your thing, there are many places where you can sit down to have just a drink or a drink with food. Choose Little Bird, a great bar for a bloody good Bloody Mary&rsquo;s or 42 Maltby Street, which serves up amazing seasonal delicacies and has a most unusual wine list. Both bars are relaxed, charming and tasty.<br /> <br /> <br /> Ropewalk at Maltby Street is not large, in fact it is a mere slip of a girl compared with the nearby Grand Dame of markets, Borough. You could elbow your way through in five minutes but you will find most people taking their time with their eyes following their noses as they gently wend their way. If you are left hungry for more markets, either head back to Borough or see what is happening at Bermondsey Spa and nearby Druid Street.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Matlby Street" src="/images/blogs/Maltby_Street_4.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 795px;" /><br /> <br /> The market has been here for only six years and has been incredibly successful. This little strip of stalls and under the arches eateries is still going strong. There is no publicity, no signposts; it is just powered by word of mouth.<br /> <br /> Saturday 9am - 4pm<br /> Sunday 11am - 4pm<br /> http://www.maltby.st</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Evergreen Christmas https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/evergreen-christmas/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/evergreen-christmas/#comments Tues, 20 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/evergreen-christmas/ “Deck the hall with boughs of holly” and “The holly and the ivy” are two well-known Christmas carols. What on earth do these evergreens have to do with the birth of little baby Jesus? Well, to be honest, very little! “Deck the hall with boughs of holly” and “The holly and the ivy” are two well-known Christmas carols. What on earth do these evergreens have to do with the birth of little baby Jesus? Well, to be honest, very little!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_456.jpg"<br/><br/>&ldquo;Deck the hall with boughs of holly&rdquo; and &ldquo;The holly and the ivy&rdquo; are two well-known Christmas carols.&nbsp; What on earth do these evergreens have to do with the birth of little baby Jesus? Well, to be honest, very little!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Trying to convert English pagans to Christianity was probably a difficult job and so to do so, a few ancient hard-to-give-up traditions needed to be kept in order for Christianity to be easier to accept.&nbsp; This included evergreens, which were a source of fascination and mystery for man giving a sense of hope in the darkest days and a nod to the forthcoming Spring. How did they survive even the harshest winters? To ancient man, they appeared immortal and therefore were held in high regard.<br /> <br /> Mistletoe has been used as a midwinter decoration since the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons to Britain in the fifth century. Druids were convinced of its mystical powers to bring luck and ward off evil spirits. In Norse mythology, it was used as a sign of love and friendship and probably the reason why we use it as a &quot;kissing bough.&quot; In the 18<sup>th</sup> Century, the wealthy would use this as the main decoration for the season. Two hoops were joined to make a globe, decorated with greenery, oranges, and apples. Mistletoe became more widely popular as it moved downstairs and became a tradition of the Victorian serving classes. Any man was allowed to kiss a woman who stood under mistletoe; it was considered bad luck to refuse a kiss.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Christmas tree is a wonderful example of the adoption of pagan beliefs into Christianity. Martin Luther (1483-1546), father of Protestantism was walking through a forest on a starlit night when he looked up. He was taken by the sight before him and thought that it looked as if the stars were sitting on the trees themselves and the tradition of decorating evergreens with stars and lights was born. This German tradition came over to England with the Georgian kings but only featured in aristocratic households. It was the depiction in The Illustrated London News of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert standing around a Christmas tree with their children by their side that popularised this tradition in the UK.<br /> Decorating homes with holly and ivy plants has been going on for thousands of years around Europe. They helped freshen the air in houses, the greenery filled people full of hope for Spring and the red berries also added a splash of colour. Along with other evergreens, holly and ivy were believed to have magical properties. In ancient cultures, the winds in the dark nights were thought to be demons and ghosts flying around. Decorating your home with holly and ivy could keep the evil spirits away. They were symbolic of the lengthening days and the start of the new season which made them popular and colourful for winter festivities. Over time, these customs became part of the Christmas celebration and are still used today &ndash; more for decorative reasons than for magical ones!&nbsp;<br /> 0 Christmas Traditions https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-traditions/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-traditions/#comments Tues, 20 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-traditions/ The 1840’s were a great time for the re-invention of Christmas. A Christmas Carol, the Christmas card and the Christmas cracker were all invented within a year or so of each other but the icing on the cake was the picture of the royal family in the Illustrated London News. The 1840’s were a great time for the re-invention of Christmas. A Christmas Carol, the Christmas card and the Christmas cracker were all invented within a year or so of each other but the icing on the cake was the picture of the royal family in the Illustrated London News. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_454.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> The 1840&rsquo;s were a great time for the re-invention of Christmas. A Christmas Carol, the Christmas card, and the Christmas cracker were all invented within a year or so of each other but the icing on the cake was the picture of the royal family in the Illustrated London News. Gathered around the Christmas tree, the royal family was the perfect poster family for Christmas. It was this image that sent families running out to get their own trees for their parlours. Christmas was back with renewed vigour!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In 1843, a rather time-poor Sir Henry Cole was scratching his head over how he could cut down the amount of writing he had to do over the festive period. It was normal to write epistles to distant family members and far flung friends, a hobby that many enjoyed but not Sir Henry! Enter the artist, John Calcott Horsley of the Royal Academy of Arts who was commissioned by Sir Henry to develop a decorated &lsquo;notelet&rsquo;. The space available for writing was just a small rectangle, perfect for a few perfunctory lines and a &ldquo;Merry Christmas to all.&rdquo; He had a thousand printed and those he didn&rsquo;t use went on sale in his Bond Street stationer&rsquo;s shop. Slowly over the space of a few decades, the greetings card idea took off and became the popular tradition that still continues today &ndash; all greatly helped by the Penny Post.<br /> <a href="http://www.victorianweb.org/authors/dickens/pva13.html">A Christmas Carol</a>, published on 19<sup>th</sup> December 1843 has helped cement the Christmas customs of olde England and fixed our image of the snowy midwinter with Smoking Bishop (mulled wine), a golden brown roast turkey and family cheer. The ever-so-nostalgic Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol to shock people. He uses a ghost story to remind people to be kind and thoughtful towards others. The winter solstice, the longest night of the year was traditionally a time for a ghostly Winters Tale, as, on this night, the boundaries between the physical and spiritual worlds were considered particularly permeable. It was believed that spirits would return to Earth to finish unsettled business - exactly what Jacob Marley does in A Christmas Carol.<br /> Long winter nights were a great time to tell long tales, especially spooky ones. This tradition stretches back many hundreds of years but it was the Victorians who loved all things supernatural and the tradition of telling ghost stories at Christmas stuck. A Christmas Carol scared many selfish Victorians and it makes you wonder how many were kept awake on Christmas Eve expecting the visit of the ghosts of Christmas past, present and future!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Throughout many cultures and across several centuries, Christmas was a time of gift giving. In Victorian times, the festival became a celebration that centred on children. Wooden toys were traditionally made in the East End and sent all over the country to happy children waiting eagerly for Father Christmas to arrive. Christmas crackers were invented in the early 1840&rsquo;s by a London sweet-maker called Tom Smith. He used to sell these bonbons wrapped in twists of paper. Ever the inventor, Tom was always looking for ways of selling sweets and making money. He added &lsquo;love messages&rsquo; into the twisted paper but the &lsquo;snap&rsquo; of the &lsquo;cracker&rsquo; seemed to have been a delightful accident. As was usual at this time, people would have large fires to warm themselves in their parlours. Tom was nodding off nicely in front of his when a crackling log rolled out of the fire. The noise woke him, and although most people would be alarmed at the potential for fire, he had found the element to make his sweet sales go with a bang! Eventually the sweet was replaced with small trinkets and a paper crown and the Christmas Cracker was born.&nbsp; 0 The Christmas Table https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-christmas-table-/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-christmas-table-/#comments Mon, 19 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-christmas-table-/ Sometimes, I wish I could travel back in time to witness the great feasts and celebrations of the Medieval and Tudor eras. Christmases were long drawn out affairs, lasting 12 full days... Sometimes, I wish I could travel back in time to witness the great feasts and celebrations of the Medieval and Tudor eras. Christmases were long drawn out affairs, lasting 12 full days...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_455.jpg"<br/><br/>Sometimes, I wish I could travel back in time to witness the great feasts and celebrations of the Medieval and Tudor eras. Christmases were long drawn out affairs, lasting 12 full days. Of course, it was only the nobility who would have had these long festivities; it would have been a very different story for the cook and the servants who had to prepare and serve food constantly for 11 days and only being able to relax a bit on the Twelfth.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Imagine Christmas Day every day for 11 days straight and then maybe a day of cold meats for the twelfth! To some, this sounds amazing but to the majority, we would certainly struggle. However, the run-up to Christmas Day or Advent was not filled with office parties and &lsquo;urban family&rsquo; get-togethers; it was a time of fasting and abstemiousness. Advent was 24 days of preparation for the body and soul &ndash; a pre-binge detox to cope with the excesses of the 12 days of Yuletide.&nbsp; And you would have needed it, as Yule foods were rich and meaty &ndash; beef, venison, and goose were enjoyed in great quantities. We now think of turkey as the Christmas main course and in fact, we have been eating this since Dickens was a lad but traditionally, it was the humble goose that would have had its moment on the festive table of most families. Old Mother Goose, she of Pantomime fame, used to make little booties for her geese in order to protect their little feet on the very long walk into London! So you can imagine that this was not the delicious, juicy goose we know today but a tougher, bonier and greasier older relation. No wonder the American import, the turkey, began to replace it.<br /> The medieval rich would have enjoyed roast venison however they wouldn&rsquo;t eat the offal, which was known as umbles, so they would give this away to their servants. These umbles were then fashioned into some sort of pie and so they were forced to eat umble pie!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Mince pies should be a medley of dark, spicy, fruit and brandy tucked into a small and delicate crumbly pastry case. It should be easy to eat as an accompaniment to a small glass of sherry or slathered in cream or brandy butter and eaten at every available moment. Well, that is my personal opinion and, yes, it used to contain minced beef. &nbsp;There were layers of spiced fruit and also beef. It was a luxurious and somewhat decadent pie as beef was costly and you could hardly taste it above the spicy fruitiness! The Victorians saw it as wasteful so mince pies became meatless from this time as suet replaced the beef.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Traditionally, plums, grapes, apricots and other fruits were dried and used throughout the long hard winters as a sweet treat. They also found their way into many of the UK&rsquo;s traditional Christmas foods, for example, Christmas pudding. This started out as a pottage, a type of soup, to which dried fruit and old breadcrumbs were added.<br /> The Christmas pudding (also known as Plum pudding or Figgy pudding) evolved out of this soupy concoction (goodness only knows how!) and became the dense, rich, booze-laden &lsquo;pudding&rsquo; that we know today. The survival of the Christmas pudding abroad owes much to Charles Dickens&#39; image of the Cratchits&#39; pudding &lsquo;singing&rsquo; in the copper pot. The idea of setting the pudding alight was probably a throwback to a popular game called Snap Dragon. This game was a pyromaniac&rsquo;s dream where you competed to pull burning raisins from a flaming bowl of brandy!<br /> Christmas cake was traditionally served on Twelfth night. It was a heavy cake filled with dried fruits, nuts, and later alcohol. In the 1650&rsquo;s, it was banned by Oliver Cromwell, the Lord Protector of England, along with all associated feasting. I have a feeling that he was not a fan of dried fruit! In the 18<sup>th</sup> Century, the cake was covered in marzipan and incredibly ornate icing which was to show off the skill of the baker and also the wealth of a family as sugar was expensive. The baker would have stirred in a dried bean (later becoming a sixpence) into the Christmas cake mix. Whoever found this tooth-breaking trinket within their slice became King or Queen for the day. Traditionally, this was so that a member of the staff of a large household could take the day off and be treated like royalty for the day!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Christmas Drinks - Eggnog https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-eggnog/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-eggnog/#comments Mon, 12 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-eggnog/ I have fond memories of a wonderful, elderly American aunt. She was great fun and made the best brownies I have ever tasted... I have fond memories of a wonderful, elderly American aunt. She was great fun and made the best brownies I have ever tasted...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_450.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Eggnog</span></div> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> I have fond memories of a wonderful, elderly American aunt. She was great fun and made the best brownies I have ever tasted. However, she was also blunt and to the point. If she thought anyone was acting a little spoilt or if she wanted you to be more grateful, she would simply say &ldquo;so, do you want egg in your beer?&rdquo; I didn&rsquo;t have a clue what she meant and I have a feeling that I am not alone. Apparently, it is a North American expression, the English equivalent of which would be the equally sarcastic &ldquo;do you want jam on it?&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Now, back to egg and beer; what I didn&rsquo;t realize at the time was that people did actually put egg in their beer! This is a tradition that dates all the way back to Medieval times. During the year, people would drink ale and beer on a regular basis, but at Christmas, they would often fortify it with egg and sometimes cream. This made it a more nutritious and luxurious version of an everyday drink and so eggnog was born. This egg concoction could be enjoyed when energy levels were in need of a little pick-me-up. This makes a lot more sense when you realize that the month of December was spent fasting. Advent was a time to prepare for the onslaught of 12 days of Christmas feasting.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> It is rumoured that eggnog developed from posset, a medieval hot, milky drink that was curdled with wine or ale and flavoured with spices. In Britain, the drink was popular among the aristocracy as it used expensive ingredients such as milk, eggs, sugar and alcohol including brandy and sherry.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Nowadays, eggnog is served cold; it is a creamy beverage that includes sugar, cream and whipped eggs. Whipping the eggs gives a delightful frothy texture. It can be served without alcohol but brandy, rum, or even bourbon make it a festive treat. Eggnog is a drink we often associate with Thanksgiving and American Christmases. The drink became popular in the colonies during the 18<sup>th</sup> century where they used rum from the Caribbean as it was more cost effective than buying the heavily taxed brandies and wine from Europe. I have to say that eggnog works very well with rum but if you like it boozy, you can follow George Washington&rsquo;s recipe which calls for rye whiskey, rum and sherry!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> At a time when we can hardly fit in a mince pie between the enormous Christmas meals, it is understandable that eggnog has taken a backseat to other less filling intoxicants. However, if you can find an evening between Christmas and New Year when you are using up leftovers, this delightful tipple will take you back to Christmases of yore!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Recipe:<br /> (Serves 8)<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 700ml whole milk<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 240ml heavy or double cream<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 3 cinnamon sticks<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1 vanilla bean pod, split and seeds removed<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg, plus more for garnish (or you can use cinnamon)<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5 eggs, separated<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 130g granulated sugar<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 175ml dark rum, bourbon or brandy<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In a saucepan, combine milk, cream, cinnamon, vanilla bean, vanilla seeds, and nutmeg.<br /> <br /> Bring to the boil over a medium heat.<br /> <br /> Once boiling, remove from the heat and allow to steep.<br /> <br /> In a large bowl or stand mixer, beat egg yolks and sugar until combined and thick ribbons form when the whisk is lifted.<br /> <br /> Slowly whisk in the milk and continue to mix until the mixture is combined and smooth.<br /> Add bourbon, rum, and stir.<br /> <br /> Refrigerate overnight or for up to 3 days.<br /> <br /> Before serving, beat the egg whites in a large bowl or stand mixer until soft peaks form.<br /> <br /> Gently fold into eggnog until combined.<br /> <br /> Serve and garnish with freshly grated nutmeg or cinnamon.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Christmas Drinks - Smoking Bishop https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/#comments Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/ In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens’s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob’s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop! In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens’s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob’s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_452.jpg"<br/><br/><h1 align="center"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Christmas drinks &nbsp;- Smoking Bishop</span></h1> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> &ldquo;A merrier Christmas, Bob, my good fellow, than I have given you for many a year! I&rsquo;ll raise your salary, and endeavour to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon over a bowl of smoking bishop, Bob!&rdquo;<br /> A Christmas Carol<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens&rsquo;s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob&rsquo;s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop! This is a delicious, zesty and spicy mulled wine fortified with port. In fact, if all work appraisals were conducted in a similar way, I am certain employee satisfaction would be much improved!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The word &lsquo;bishop&rsquo; was a 19<sup>th</sup> century euphemism for port. In fact, if you failed to pass the port around the table after dinner, the polite way of chivying the decanter to come your way was to ask, &ldquo;<em>Do you know the Bishop of Norwich?</em>&rdquo; Smoking bishop refers to the heating of the spicy port elixir until a delicious steam is seen rising from the pan. This shows the drink is ready to serve in warmed glasses. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> During the long, cold nights around the winter solstice, is there a more perfect drink? Warming and sweet, the port and oranges capture Iberian sunshine and the spices take us to exotic climes just in time for the Winter sun break advertising!</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Recipe:<br /> (Serves 8)<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5 unpeeled oranges &ndash; sweet or Seville will do<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half a large unpeeled <a href="http://www.food.com/about/grapefruit-243">grapefruit</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 60g soft brown <a href="http://www.food.com/about/sugar-139">sugar</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 20 <a href="http://www.food.com/about/clove-325">cloves</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2 sticks of cinnamon<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1litre strong <a href="http://www.food.com/about/wine-184">red wine</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 500 ml ruby port</span><br /> <p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Heat the oven to 180</span><span style="font-family: arial, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;">&deg;</span><span style="font-size: 14px;">c</span></p> <p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Wash the fruit and cook on a foil lined baking tray until they become pale brown. Turn once.</span></p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Stud each fruit with the cloves.<br /> Heat a large earthenware bowl and add the fruit.<br /> Add the sugar and the red wine, cover and store in a warm place (an airing cupboard is perfect!)<br /> After about a day of muddling, squeeze the fruit to extract the juice, and strain into a saucepan.<br /> Add the port and warm thoroughly, but don&rsquo;t boil.<br /> Taste. You can add a little lemon juice if you like the drink a little sharper, some orange juice if the oranges were not very juicy or mix in a little sugar syrup if you prefer it sweeter.<br /> Serve in warmed glasses.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Here are some fun variations to make if you have the time and energy!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archbishop">Archbishop</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claret">claret</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beadle">Beadle</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger_wine">ginger wine</a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raisin">raisins</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardinal_(Catholicism)">Cardinal</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champagne">Champagne</a> or <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhine_wine">Rhine wine</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope">Pope</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgundy_wine">burgundy</a><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Parlour Games - Reverend Crawley's Game https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/#comments Weds, 30 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/ Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband feel ever so slightly uncomfortable. Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband feel ever so slightly uncomfortable.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_442.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> <em>This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> <br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games. .</em>&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <strong>Reverend Crawley&#39;s Games:</strong><br /> <br /> We don&#39;t the identity of the clergyman who created this game or why his name was given to it but nevertheless it is a fun game. It is a winning combination of gentle exercise, moments of involuntary closeness and a surprising outcome.<br /> <br /> <strong>The rules:</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Everybody stands in a circle.<br /> Each player then holds hands with another player, but the hands may not be those of the person next to them, and they may not hold both hands with the same person.<br /> This creates a large human knot.<br /> The group now has to work out how to untangle the knot without anyone letting go of any hands.<br /> This involves twisting and contorting and should end in one or two circles of people.<br /> <br /> <strong>The Family Christmas</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband ever so feel slightly uncomfortable. She has many favourite games in her repertoire including the widely inappropriate Forfeits, however, this year&rsquo;s pet game is &ldquo;Reverend Crawley&rsquo;s Game&rdquo;. Enthusiastically, she gets everyone to hold hands to form a human knot. She studies the group to see if anyone is revealing anything or holding hands with anyone they shouldn&rsquo;t be. She is slightly shocked to see that her daughter hasn&rsquo;t made any attempt to be near her own husband throughout the whole proceedings and is not slow to notice that the Duke has managed to grab the hand of the young Major. She also sees her husband, Lord George avoiding the hands of any of the young women being proffered to him. He is muttering to himself &ldquo;the flesh is weak&rdquo;. It is indiscernible to anyone but her; she has heard this mantra on many occasions although he does not even realize he is giving away any secrets. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Once everyone is in a good muddle, the task of undoing the knot begins. Young women walk under linked arms and step over grasped hands. She notices the Duchess&rsquo;s lips are almost touching the cheek of a young man opposite as she tries to step through his crossed arms. The Duke appears to be breathing down the collar of the same man, which makes for very uncomfortable viewing. Does anyone else feel that the room is hot all of a sudden? The writhing and undoing of the bond continues &ndash; nobody expects to be able to get this undone but as the game continues, suddenly everyone is amazed that they are now in one enormous ring. Ever so slightly embarrassed, Lord George suggests a calming round of Kim&rsquo;s Game&hellip;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Christmas Drinks - Wassail https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/#comments Tues, 29 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/ Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a wassailing bowl... Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a wassailing bowl...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_446.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <h1 align="center"> Wassail</h1> <br /> Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a &lsquo;wassailing bowl&rsquo;. One of the earliest versions of this drink was called &ldquo;Lambswool&rdquo; which was basically mead, heated up with the addition of roasted crab apples. The drink would be shaken, stirred or transferred backwards and forwards between two jugs or tankards, until the apples burst creating a foam that resembled lamb&rsquo;s wool.<br /> <br /> <br /> Later, the drink was more likely to be a mulled cider made with sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon and ginger but still drunk from a large communal bowl. These bowls were usually wooden but were also made from pottery or tin and had handles to make it easier to share. Very often slices of toast would be dropped into the drink. These would float on the surface for a while before absorbing the alcohol, dropping to the bottom and being eaten as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sop">sops</a> once the liquid had all gone.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>The Recipe:</strong><br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1 litre of traditional real ale or traditional cider<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 small cooking apples, cored but kept whole<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half a nutmeg freshly grated<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half tsp ground ginger<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half tsp ground cinnamon<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 100g brown sugar<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Apples:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Preheat the oven 120C<br /> Prepare the apples in advance so they are ready when you want to put them into the lambswool to serve<br /> Lightly grease the baking tray and arrange the cored apples about 6cm apart<br /> Bake the apples at 120C for about an hour until they become soft and pulpy and the skins are easy to peel away<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Beer or Cider:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Add sugar to a large high-sided, thick- bottomed saucepan<br /> Cover the sugar in a small amount of the ale (or cider) and heat gently<br /> Stir continuously until the sugar has dissolved<br /> Then add in the ground ginger, cinnamon and grate in the nutmeg<br /> Stir, and keeping the pan on a gentle simmer, slowly add in all the rest of the ale (or cider). Leave for 10 minutes on a very gentle heat<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Take the baked apples out of the oven to cool slightly for 10 minutes<br /> Scoop out the baked flesh into a bowl, then take a fork and mash the apple pulp, while it is still warm, into a smooth pur&eacute;e with no lumps, pips or bits of skin<br /> Add the apple pur&eacute;e into the ale (or cider) lambswool, mixing it in with a whisk<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Let the saucepan continue to warm everything through for thirty minutes, on a very gentle heat, until ready to drink. When warmed through use the whisk again for a couple of minutes to briskly and vigorously froth the drink up and mix everything together<br /> The apple and light froth will float to the surface, and depending on how much you have whisked it, the more it looks like lamb&rsquo;s wool<br /> Ladle the hot Lambswool into heat-proof mugs or glasses and grate over some nutmeg<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Serves 4<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>The History:</strong><br /> <br /> Wassailing is an ancient mid-winter tradition that pre-dates Christianity. In the depths of winter, villagers would attempt to scare off evil spirits and demons to ensure good crops for the year ahead. Wassailing included marching around the fields and orchards, shouting loudly and pouring cider on the plants and fruit trees. This custom has died out in many parts although it is still practiced in the cider-producing counties of England.<br /> <br /> <br /> In the Middle Ages, wassailing was a time for peasants to knock on the door of their feudal lord and demand food, drink and charity in exchange for well wishes of &lsquo;Waes Hail&rsquo; or &lsquo;Good Health&rsquo;. Most landlords would oblige as they did not wish to risk a curse or probably worse still have their estates vandalized. We can see a hint at this rather sinister custom in the classic Dickensian hymn, &ldquo;We Wish You a Merry Christmas&rdquo; the lyrics of which are below. Wassailers would stand outside the door to their landlord&rsquo;s house and call for a figgy pudding and a cup of good cheer (wassail). They wouldn&rsquo;t leave until they got some.<br /> <br /> <br /> More recently, &ldquo;Wassailing&rdquo; is more commonly known as &ldquo;Caroling&rdquo; where people knock on neighbours&rsquo; doors and sing to the household in exchange for a donation to charity. Another version is to sing outside a pub where the landlord might offer a free drink and the customers, loosened by a festive glass of alcohol or two, may reach further into their pockets than normal.<br /> <h1> &nbsp;</h1> <br /> <br /> <h1> &nbsp;</h1> 0 Parlour Games - Kim's Game https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-kims-game/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-kims-game/#comments Mon, 28 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-kims-game/ More from our Christmas with Penhaligon's Portraits family series. A time for Parlour games and scandal... More from our Christmas with Penhaligon's Portraits family series. A time for Parlour games and scandal...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_443.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> <br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games. Kim&#39;s Game is a simple memory game, named after Rudyard Kipling&rsquo;s novel, Kim, published in 1901. This was a new game for a new era. It was primarily a children&rsquo;s game but many adults liked the simplicity and benign nature of the game. This game will be anything but!</em></span><br /> <br /> <p> <span style="font-size:14px;">Kim&#39;s Game is a simple memory game, named after Rudyard Kipling&rsquo;s novel, Kim, published in 1901. This was a new game for a new era. It was primarily a children&rsquo;s game but many adults liked the simplicity and benign nature of the game. This game will be anything but!</span></p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> The rules of Kim&rsquo;s <span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Game:</span><br /> &nbsp;</span> <p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">A tray is prepared containing a selection of small random articles and items. The participants are given some time to look at the tray to remember the contents.</span></p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The tray is covered or removed, and the players then try to make a list of the articles.<br /> It is much harder than it sounds and the memory plays many tricks.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <u>The Family Christmas</u><br /> <br /> Christmas is an odd time of year for Lord George. He is never more uncomfortable than when he has to perform the role of patriarch for more than a few hours. The Lord misses the freedom of London, his club and his secret trysts. He likes to show that he is the benevolent father and is generous with his Christmas gifts; maybe in an attempt to buy their favour and discretion for yet another year. To him, parlour games are puerile, potentially embarrassing and he never quite understands why his family revels in them quite as much as they do. Some games get out of control and this is where Lord George steps in with his suggestion of a new game.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> He asks a member of staff to get the tray prepared. He does not know what is going to be included. This year the tray comes out and the party jostles in to position to get a good view of the items to be remembered. There are 12 pieces on the tray; the Duke looks at these in stunned silence. It is like someone has read his mind and placed the most important and intimate aspects of his life in full view of friends and family.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> His family are a little shocked by what is sitting on the tray in front of them but luckily the guests do not get the significance of some of the pieces and find it all good clean fun!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The items include:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> A cigar<br /> A card from his club<br /> An empty bottle of Armagnac<br /> A lady&rsquo;s handkerchief embroidered with the letter &lsquo;C&rsquo;<br /> A pocket watch<br /> An unpaid invoice from his tailor<br /> A hip flask<br /> A trilby hat<br /> A crucifix<br /> A cricket ball<br /> A hotel key<br /> A revolver<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As everyone is looking at each item in turn, hoping to be able to recall the list when the time arises, Lord George catches the eye of Lady Blanche. She holds his gaze as she picks up the handkerchief as if to examine the needlework. He reddens and rings for the tray to be taken away.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Holidays are Coming... https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/holidays-are-coming/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/holidays-are-coming/#comments Thurs, 24 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/holidays-are-coming/ Our Christmas Edition Stag Heads are coming to town... Our Christmas Edition Stag Heads are coming to town...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_447.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Here at Penhaligon&#39;s HQ its officially Christmas. We are well underway with decking the halls across all of our stores, why not pop-in to see for yourself? We now have extended Christmas hours, <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">see here.&nbsp;</a></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Xmas1.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">If that doesn&#39;t tempt you, here&#39;s a sneak peak at our Christmas Edition Stag Heads...</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Sprayed%20Stags%20(4).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> 0 A Scent-imental Journey by Jessica A. Volz https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/#comments Weds, 23 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Jessica https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/ While some fragrances in Penhaligon’s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, Gardenia has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible... While some fragrances in Penhaligon’s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, Gardenia has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_428.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">When facing the conundrum of packing for treks by train and by Tube, the scent-imental need not be sacrificed for the so-called practical. Shedding kilos may help when tasked with whisking yourself and your bags up flights of stairs without falling head over heels, but at the end of the day, regrets are regrets. And there is one article that I would never dream of embarking on a voyage without: a well-cushioned bottle (or travel atomiser) of Penhaligon&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia Eau de Toilette</strong>.</a><br /> <br /> While some fragrances in Penhaligon&rsquo;s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia </strong></a>has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible. Its petal-perfect essence lingers for hours, showcasing a romantic cocktail of heart notes that never&nbsp;fade.<br /> <br /> One particularly dreary Sunday &ndash; before the climactic return of <em>Poldark </em>and the resplendent rise of <em>Victoria</em> &ndash; I happened to find myself wandering around London, with my thoughts several thousand kilometres away. I was basking on a sunbathed island where birds of paradise are not the only flowers that reign. As I passed by Penhaligon&rsquo;s in Burlington Arcade, I stumbled out of my reverie and into my favourite boutique. The tiniest ray of sunshine appeared, projecting a fortuitous spotlight on a bottle of unmatched elegance. Unable to make out the name, I tiptoed towards it, sneaking past bottles of Vaara and Artemisia.<br /> <br /> &lsquo;I thought you would be the sort of young lady who would ultimately go for Gardenia&rsquo;, said a petite woman, whose eyes sparkled like sapphires and whose intuition rivalled Mr Ollivander&rsquo;s. &lsquo;Well, I tend to follow my nose&rsquo;, I confessed.<br /> <br /> &lsquo;Your taste is indeed impeccable&rsquo;, my companion continued. &lsquo;You must be well-versed in Austen and an admirer of pink champagne truffles topped with sugared violets. Your consumption of tea must be considerable&rsquo;.<br /> <br /> Such an accurate conclusion steered me away from the path of vacillation, and I found myself leaving Burlington Arcade with my weathered umbrella dangling from one arm and a bottle of exquisitely packaged <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> from the other.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Wherever in the world you may find yourself, <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> extends this humble promise: to drench you in a glamourous glow that is reminiscent of the silver screen. Its wistful overlays of jasmine, violet, rose, hyacinth, musk and vanilla make for a sumptuous bouquet with just the right sprinkling of spice. A single spritz has the potential to transport you to the place where you truly belong &ndash; whether it&rsquo;s in Fragonard&rsquo;s <em>The Swing </em>in The Wallace Collection, marooned on Bora Bora or on the set of a period drama.<br /> <br /> Relaunched in 2009, <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> is a timeless classic that, like a strand of pearls, is certain to give you the aura of confidence and effortless grace that is perfect for any and every occasion.</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Christmas Tipple https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks/#comments Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks/ Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that). Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that).<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_448.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that). In this series of blogs, we will look at a few of these drinks, some we know and love and some we don&rsquo;t but we may come to love. We will also find out who drank them and when. I will also include a little recipe for each one in case you fancy recreating any over the festive period.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Medieval and Tudor Christmases for the top level of society were long drawn out affairs and very different to our current version. The run up to Christmas Day or Advent was not filled with office parties and &lsquo;urban family&rsquo; get-togethers. It was a time of fasting and abstemiousness. Advent was 24 days of preparation for the body and soul &ndash; a pre-binge detox to cope with the excesses of the 12 days of Yuletide. &nbsp;Yule foods were rich and meaty &ndash; beef, venison and goose were enjoyed. The rich wouldn&rsquo;t eat the offal, also known as umbles at this time, so they would give this away to their servants. These umbles were then fashioned into some sort of pie - umble pie!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Beer was the main drink of this period but there were plenty of other historical Christmas drinks some of which were revived during Victorian and Edwardian times. Toddies, wassail, posset, wine, especially mulled wine and punch were all traditional and highly alcoholic. If you were feeling incredibly brave, you could play a game of Snap Dragon. Snap Dragon involved a bowl of brandy in which sultanas had been soaked. So far, so good! However, the mixture was heated and then set alight so that the bowl became a cauldron of burning alcohol. The game was to remove the flaming sultanas from the scalding brandy. Whoever collected the highest number of sultanas would be the winner. Please do not try this at home!&nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Christmas With The Penhaligon's Portraits Family https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/#comments Tues, 08 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/ Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots.. Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots..<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_435.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots..&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The usual Christmas celebrations and traditions were being lost and it was time for someone to do something about it. &nbsp;Enter a small army of sentimentalists with Prince Albert as Commander in Chief and Charles Dickens as its General. Their aim was to breathe onto the dying embers of the yule log, rekindling the Christmas spirit. This was in the hope of bringing the post Industrial diaspora back into the bosom of the family and keeping the tradition alive. Charles Dickens showed us that Christmas was a time of showing goodwill and being amongst family. Festive food, drinks, decorations, gift giving and parlour games were all essential elements that were restored and revived. The Dickensian Christmas had been invented and yuletide was saved for future generations.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is where the fun starts in more ways than one. There are many parlour games to choose from, some have been with us for thousands of years and some are new inventions to add a little variety and fun to the proceedings.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As the evening unfurls, the masks of respectability start to slip, fuses get shorter and morals loosen!&nbsp; Who will see through Blind Man&rsquo;s Buff? Who will enjoy the irony of playing Charades? By the end of the night, will anyone have to pay a real forfeit? In a time where manners were the embodiment of class, will we see anyone disgrace themselves or worse?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> To follow is a series of blogs that will feature some of the most popular games of the times. Each of the four blogs will be dedicated to each member of the Portrait&rsquo;s family. Let the fun begin!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known London – St James and Mayfair https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/#comments Mon, 31 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/ To get you into the spirit of Hallowe’en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk. To get you into the spirit of Hallowe’en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_431.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> To get you into the spirit of Hallowe&rsquo;en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk. Enter via the narrow passageway by the rear entrance of the Stafford Hotel. Green Park may look pretty in the day but it is notorious for tales of murder, illegal duelling and even an assassination attempt on Queen Victoria; it is a dark place in both meanings of the word. There are rumours of a leper burial ground and a plague pit but also a haunted Plane tree where no bird or squirrel will play and around which no flowers will grow. &nbsp;As a Hallowe&rsquo;en treat why not go in search of this &ldquo;Tree of Death&rdquo;. No one will admit to its exact location, so please feel free to claim one that looks appropriately scary. When you have chosen your tree, it might be fun to see if any of the stories are true!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> If you are feeling brave enough, sit by your nominated tree, settle a moment and then listen. Imagine you can you discern rhythmic breathing coming from deep within the trunk. Concentrate and you could start to hear a low and sinister laugh, a laugh that builds into something truly horrendous and hideous. No one knows why these sounds emanate from the tree but once heard, they are enough to make the hairs on your neck stand up. Your first instinct is to get up and run away as fast as possible but if you can hold your ground long enough, take time to look up. Within the branches you may be able to make out the figure of a man. He is climbing the tree, carrying a coil of rope. The rope is then tied carefully around a large branch way up in the tree and then he places a noose around his neck.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Close your eyes as you imagine him jumping; there is no noise apart from the tree creaking and an occasional twig breaking. Then there is complete silence and as you open your eyes again, there is no one there. Many a young couple who have used the cover of the tree for a romantic moment before being unnerved or frightened off by the noises originating from deep within the trunk. Could this tree have been the site of a man ending his own life or maybe there is a worried father following his daughter when she is out on a first date?!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> 50 Berkeley Square, is home to a weird yet compelling monster/ghost. There have been so many tales of this sinister creature that it became known as the Beast of Berkeley Square. It started becoming the talk of the town in the 1840&rsquo;s when a brave but intoxicated 20 year-old aristocrat took a wager to stay in the house&rsquo;s most notorious room for a night. He persuaded the landlord to let him in late one evening. Begrudgingly, the landlord allowed him to stay in the room on the top floor but insisted that he take a gun and a bell into the room to be used in case of an emergency. Within a few minutes, the bell was ringing furiously. The landlord ran up the stairs to the room to find a smoking gun on the floor beside the body of the young gentleman. He had backed himself into a corner and had taken a shot at the intruder but there was no trace of the bullet. There were no marks or signs of a struggle; it was as if the man had died of shock. His face was contorted into an expression of abject fear and his wide eyes were nearly out of their sockets as if he had witnessed something unthinkably foul and grotesque.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The top floor room has allegedly been locked ever since until one night in 1943&hellip;.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Even the royal family is not exempt. St James&rsquo;s and Buckingham Palaces are both rumoured to be haunted, in fact, St James Palace&rsquo;s seems to have a particularly nasty royal wraith.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The ghost story involves the Duke of Cumberland, uncle to the future Queen Victoria and his valet, Joseph Sellis. In 1810 the Duke had been attacked in his own bed sustaining cuts to his hands and thigh. The Duke&rsquo;s valet, who slept in the adjacent room, had seemingly slept through the whole debacle. The Duke called for the doctor and sent for his valet to attend to him. The valet was found in his bed, lying in a pool of his own of blood. He had been murdered. The subsequent inquest returned the surprising verdict of suicide. The reason cited was that he must have attacked the Duke in a fit of pique and had then decided to take his own life. Even a layman would know that this was unlikely as there seemed to be no motive for the attack and his injuries were so severe that they could not have been self-inflicted. Many believed the Duke responsible for his death, covering up the murder by pretending there had been an attempt on his own life. It seems that Sellis&rsquo;s ghost has been trying to wreak revenge ever since. Maybe he wanted to scare the Duke or even to tell the world of this wrong decision. He is sometimes seen wandering the halls as a bloodstained apparition. Others have the sense that they are being watched even though there is no one in the room; this is often accompanied by the foul and metallic scent of blood. If you wander the alleyways or corridors around the palace, you may catch a glimpse of him or even detect the awful aroma that follows in his wake.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Windsors leave Buckingham Palace in December to spend Christmas at their estate in Sandringham, Norfolk. This has been a tradition for many years but maybe there is another reason for wishing to leave at this time. The 25<sup>th</sup> December is the favoured date of a ghostly manifestation of a monk dressed in a black cowl. There have been many sightings and even a photograph or two of this uninvited guest. The land Buckingham Palace is built on once belonged to the monastery of Westminster Abbey, which may give it some credibility but it does make you wonder if Her Majesty should ensure that her sherry is well and truly locked away at this time!&nbsp;<br /> 0 Pretty City London x Penhaligon's https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/prettycitylondon/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/prettycitylondon/#comments Fri, 28 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT PrettyCityLonon https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/prettycitylondon/ I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore. I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_434.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">I have been an admirer of Penhaligon&rsquo;s forever, first noticing its beautiful boutique perfumeries when working near Covent Garden. Walking past most days on my way to lunch it was hard not to notice the rich aromas spilling out on to the street. So I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore.<br /> <br /> Off I pottered to their Burlington Arcade store in the heart of Mayfair. Entering the shop is like stepping back to an age of Victorian decadence and aromatic indulgence. Lead upstairs to the opulent profiling room and sitting down to tea and to chat all things perfume and ooh me.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5257_copy.jpg" /></span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5246_copy.jpg" /></span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The passionate and expert consultant worked effortlessly for the forty-five minute session to identify my personality profile: my dislikes, favourite textiles, food, all in an effort to decipher the fragrance most suited to me. Using her expertise she narrowed down the choice to four or five stopping to give me the interesting history to each one. This is where I fall hard I love the stories behind all the scents, its Penhaligons rich history that sets it apart. Founded in 1892 by the eccentric William Penhaligon, a Cornish Barber who later moved to London and became perfumer to Queen Victoria. With a history since 1800&rsquo;s and a Royal seal of approval, Penhaligons is a true luxury. It turned out Luna was the scent for me, it celebrates a Mythical Love Story. Its fresh and floral notes are the perfect combination. Now that I have found it I can&rsquo;t imagine ever changing.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5252_copy.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;</span></div> <span style="font-size: 16px;">I loved the whole experience so much I asked if I could somehow give one of my followers the chance to experience it too so I am thrilled to say we are partnering to offer one of @prettycitylondon followers a chance to win a profiling session and take along a guest. All you have to do is share your images of London to #portraitsoflondon all next week and we will chose a lucky winner on Sunday November 6th. Good luck all!</span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> <u><strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/prettycitylondon/?hl=en /">@prettycitylondon on Instagram </a></strong></u> 0 A Day In London With The Duke https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/#comments Weds, 26 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Elena https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/ The Duke starts his day with a breakfast... The Duke starts his day with a breakfast...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_433.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Just wanted to share with you some images I took for Penhaligon&#39;s character The Duke, who is part of newly launched&nbsp;<a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Portrait&#39;s collection</a>.&nbsp;</span></span></div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The Duke starts his day with a breakfast in&nbsp;</span></span><a href="http://www.ridinghousecafe.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">the Riding House Cafe.</span></span></a></div> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <a href="http://www.ridinghousecafe.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank"><br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE1(2).jpg" style="width: 473px; height: 314px;" /></a><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE2(1).jpg" style="width: 468px; height: 312px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE3(1).jpg" style="width: 471px; height: 314px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</p> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Filling refueled, he is ready to hit the stores. He decides to go to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.libertylondon.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Liberty</a>&nbsp;first to check their new textiles and rug collections.</span></div> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE4(1).jpg" style="width: 471px; height: 314px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE5(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE6(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE7(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></p> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Doing shopping is so tiring! He feels that he needs a break. The Duke stops at&nbsp;<a href="http://said.it/en/london" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Said</a>&nbsp;for a cup of their amazing hot chocolate.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE9(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now he is ready to continue. Being a huge art admirer he goes to check out newly opened exhibition at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tate.org.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Tate Britain</a>, one of his favourite museums.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE10(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now time to visit his tailors and shoemakers on Jermyn Street.</span></span><br /> <br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE11(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE12(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 328px;" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</div> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">All the alterations are done and he is almost ready for the evening. On the way to dinner he pops into&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hatchards.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Hatchard&#39;s</a>, London&#39;s oldest bookshop, to get some more books about art as he is getting ready to attend an auction in a few days.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/DUKE13.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now the business in done and it&#39;s time to relax. He has dinner at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bentleys.org/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Bentley&#39;s Oyster Bar &amp; Grill.</a></span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/JM4A7400.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/JM4A7412.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">As evening is coming to London he crosses Picadilly and heads to see the latest play at the theatre.</span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/DUKE14.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">*In collaboration with Penhaligon&#39;s London.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Read more from Elena on: <a href="http://www.elensham.com/">http://www.elensham.com/</a></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> &nbsp;</p> 0 Little Known London – The East End at Hallowe’en https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/#comments Tues, 25 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/ The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_430.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. A walk around the East End will reveal not only some truly terrifying tales of ghostly encounters but also some secret sites where you can really scare yourself.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The East End starts immediately where the City of London ends. This was clearly marked by the long since gone city walls. It seems to be the place that attracted some very nasty occurrences. Just outside the city limits by the Andaz hotel, there is a navy plaque dedicated to the Priory of St Mary of Bethlehem. This is a reminder of the former asylum that was founded here in 1247. This asylum is more commonly known as Bedlam. The site of the hospital was on the land now managed by Network Rail and forms part of Liverpool Street station. Since the nineteenth century, there have been reports of phantom screams in the area and within the station itself. These have been attributed to a former patient of Bedlam called Rebecca Griffiths. According to local legend, Rebecca liked to play with an old penny, in fact, she was never without it in her hands. However, when she died, the coin was prised from her fingers and she was buried without it. Were these protest screams for the return of her penny or just the sounds of general madness in this very busy part of town? Who really knows!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Central line also seems to have been haunted by a lady in white. Again, could this be Rebecca? If you are feeling brave, why don&rsquo;t you stand near the mouth of the Eastbound Central line and stare into the darkness? You may be able to see a young woman wearing a white nightgown, searching for her old penny in the shadows of the tunnel.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Still at the edge of the City, there is a church called St Botolph without Bishopsgate. Walk into the church on a busy weekday, close the door and you will leave the noise and mayhem of the city behind you. This attractive church has become quite famous for a ghostly photograph taken back in the 1980&rsquo;s. The photographer seemed to have inadvertently taken a snap of a spectre. It was not until he was developing the film in his dark room that he saw a figure on the balcony in one of his photographs. He looked closer and saw that this figure came in full medieval costume and a jaunty hat. Although you could put this down to double exposure or a trick of the light, it was a strange coincidence a few years later that made him think that he had captured a spirit on celluloid. By chance, a builder who had been working in the crypt of the church loosened some bricks causing them to fall onto the top of a crypt. The crypt lid was badly damaged and needed repair. When the builder looked inside the damaged coffin, he saw a well-preserved body. This body bore an uncanny resemblance to the image he had seen in the now-infamous photograph. Take your camera at your peril!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Jack the Ripper has been the subject of many a local ghost story. There are some fabulous atmospheric alleyways that were possibly rat runs for the murderer as he escaped from his heinous crimes. Nip down the skinny Catherine Wheel Alley and hope that you do not meet anyone coming the opposite way and walk over to Artillery Passage. This is an atmospheric reminder of the cramped conditions of the East End. Spook yourself by walking down Parliament court and just hope that you do not feel the hot breath of a ghostly Jack who still scares people along such streets.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The beautiful Fournier, Princelet and Wilkes Streets are the legacy of the French Huguenots who were living here from the late seventeenth century. It is amazing to think how the stunning town houses survived two world wars as well as the city developers of the 1970s. These houses would have seen some interesting and sometimes terrifying activities relating to the most famous murderer in London. The Ten Bells pub at the end of Fournier Street seems to be chocker block with ghosts that you wonder how the punters fit in. Two of the victims of Jack the Ripper were drinking here on the nights they were murdered and it seems likely that Jack himself would have popped in for a beer or two.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> For many years, there was accommodation upstairs used by the bar staff. One of the bedrooms was known as &ldquo;Jack&rsquo;s room&rdquo;. It was rented out on a regular basis &ndash; sometimes it seems that the bed was hardly slept in before the tenant had fled wide-eyed and terrified. The ghost of Jack&rsquo;s room seems to prey mostly on women. Some claim to have woken up to find a man in bed with them with his arm around them. Understandably, this was a little alarming and as they screamed and turned on the light to see their unwanted bed partner, they are more shocked when they discover they are actually alone. Is this amorous wraith the ghost of Jack The Ripper or do these women all have the same bad dream?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> There is plenty to see in the East End and many of opportunities to scare yourself &ndash; a quick look in an estate agent&rsquo;s window should do the trick but if you fancy something a little darker, head to Spital Square and stand on the site of the Spitalfields&rsquo; Charnel house. Simply put, this was a bone deposit for medieval bones. The area was also a burial site for the Romans. Sit on one of the nearby benches in the dead of night and wait. Will you be able to hear the menacing, marching feet of a Roman garrison returning from <strong>Camulodunum</strong> or will you become aware of the rush of Boudicca&rsquo;s chariots heading to the City to raze it to the ground?&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 A Day In London With Duchess Rose https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/#comments Mon, 24 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Monalogue https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/ “Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in the society wedding of the year – some say to escape the rigour of her parents’ watchful eye. “Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in the society wedding of the year – some say to escape the rigour of her parents’ watchful eye.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_432.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> In Spring this year, I headed to Penhaligon&rsquo;s, Covent Garden for a glass of prosecco and a fragrance profiling session. In summer, I spent an afternoon in Greenwich Observatory celebrating the launch of Penhaligon&rsquo;s new fragrance, Luna. Now that Autumn is here, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have given me a new cause for celebration. The Portraits collection.<br /> <br /> <em>Portraits</em>&nbsp;showcases the English spirit. Each fragrance is a member of the family. Each family member has a story to tell. Today we are having a day out in London in&nbsp;spirit of the Duchess Rose.<br /> <br /> <em>&ldquo;Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in&nbsp;the society wedding of the year &ndash; some say to escape&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">the rigour of her parents&rsquo; watchful eye. You will&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">immediately sense the purity and pedigree of the&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">English rose &ndash; its petals still green, fresh and youthful&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&ndash; but as your acquaintance with her grows, there is much more to be discovered. An unexpected sensuality. A mandarin zest for life &ndash; brimming with juiciness and oriental vigour, and relaxing to a self- assured, confident and explosively sexy chypre. She is a mischievous fox &ndash; clever and capable of deceit whilst always pursuing opportunity. This pampered heiress has hidden depths and she intends to surprise&hellip;&rdquo;</span></em><br /> <br /> <span style="line-height: 1.5;">Well I say.</span><br /> <br /> <h2> We begin with tea&hellip;</h2> <span style="line-height: 1.5;"><img alt="Peggy Porschen London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1969 size-large" height="772" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5604.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" width="579" /></span><br /> <br /> A grand day out wouldn&rsquo;t be possible without adequate fuel. It is a necessity, therefore, for the day to begin with a spot of tea and a slice of cake (or two). Peggy Porschen, Belgravia is an ideal starting point for Duchess Rose. The entrance is adorned with a garland of roses. In the parlour, you&rsquo;ll find a selection of luxurious indulgences. Don&rsquo;t forget the champagne.<br /> <br /> <h2> Columbia Road Flower Market</h2> <img alt="RHS Chelsea Flower Show London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1569 size-large" height="772" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/img_9771.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" width="579" /><br /> <br /> On a Sunday morning, Columbia road is completely transformed with rows upon rows of delicate&nbsp;blooms. With a name like&nbsp;Duchess Rose, it would be rude not to.<br /> <br /> <h2> A stroll around Notting Hill</h2> <img alt="Notting Hill London" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-918" height="491" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3608.jpeg?resize=1147%2C1147" width="491" /><br /> <br /> After the flower market, it&rsquo;s time for a leisurely stroll around Notting Hill. From colourful terraces to charming mews, Notting Hill is a place of inspiration. If the business of the district grows too much, escape to Kensington Gardens.<br /> <br /> <h2> And look, it&rsquo;s time for tea!</h2> <img alt="Duchess Rose in London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1971 size-large" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_4377-e1475522310978-768x1024.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" style="width: 478px; height: 600px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3609.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3606.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3611.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> After so much exploring, it&rsquo;s time to replenish lost energy. Fear not, because Biscuiteers isn&rsquo;t far afield. Whether it&rsquo;s an&nbsp;edible London townhouse or an iced Beatrix Potter character, you&rsquo;re bound to find a snack that will captivate your imagination and satisfy your sugar cravings. Just in case a latte and biscuit aren&rsquo;t enough, there is also a&nbsp;high tea.<br /> <br /> <h2> Time to let your hair down&hellip;</h2> <img alt="http://i0.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5605.jpg" class="shrinkToFit" src="http://i0.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5605.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 600px;" /><br /> <br /> <p> As the day draws to a close, we mustn&rsquo;t forget that Duchess Rose has a wild side that her family have yet to discover. A glass of ros&eacute; in The Churchill Arms seems an appropriate way to indulge it.</p> <p> Where will the evening take you?</p> <p> Thank you Penhaligon&#39;s for this memorable agenda. Browse the&nbsp;Portraits collection&nbsp;and&nbsp;become <a href="https://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/">better acquainted with the characters here</a>.<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>Read more from Lifestyle Blogger &amp; Photographer Mona on: <a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/">http://www.monalogue.co.uk/</a></strong></p> 0 The Coveted Duchess Rose https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/#comments Mon, 24 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/ A fresh, sweet Rose — ready for the picking. Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire. A fresh, sweet Rose — ready for the picking. Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_418.jpg"<br/><br/><h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The Coveted Duchess Rose</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A fresh, sweet Rose &mdash; ready for the picking.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her bosom is aching for release from the corsets of Victorian life, she dreams of nothing but Paradise Regained, again and again.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When one&rsquo;s husband is at the theatre every evening, one does become terribly bored&hellip;.</span></span></div> <div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Oh heavenly joy!</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">As pure as the first rain. As crisp and sparkling as a chilled Ros&eacute;.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The sweetest rose whose fresh innocence, and general constitution is without compare.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">But by golly&hellip; quelle surprise&hellip; these corporeal, woody notes seem to reveal indiscreetly something else. </span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Something that French women might wear. At night. In the dark.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When delicacy takes on an Epicurean allure.</span></span></div> </div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Lady Blanche: The Cocktail https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/#comments Thurs, 20 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/ A subtle yet beautifully blended botanical cocktail... A subtle yet beautifully blended botanical cocktail...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_421.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 16px;"><strong>The Lady Blanche (Summerset)</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 40 ml Bloom gin<br /> 20 ml lavender syrup<br /> 15 ml lemon juice<br /> 2 dashes orange bitters<br /> 40 ml Fentiman&rsquo;s tonic/light tonic top<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Method: Build and stir gently<br /> Glass: Bloom balloon small<br /> Garnish: lavender sprig</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 An Olfactory Fiction: A day in London with Lord George https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/#comments Tues, 18 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Olga Chagunava https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/ What we imagine a day in the life of Lord George to be... What we imagine a day in the life of Lord George to be...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_427.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Lord George starts his day early in the morning in his beautiful Georgian mansion, which is situated within the heart of Richmond Park. After a cup of English Breakfast tea he takes his dog for a walk in the park.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_6198.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_6185.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Later in the morning Lord George meets his business partner for breakfast at Corner Room in Townhall Hotel.&nbsp;After breakfast Lord heads to the City of London, where he has a few important meetings.<br /> &nbsp;</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_9210(1).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" /></span><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_8393.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">In the afternoon Lord George has an appointment with the tailor in Saville Row. He picks up his tailor-made black tie for the Royal event.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_8187.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">To complete a busy day Lord George heads to Bourdon House, a Private Member&#39;s Club, where he and his colleagues enjoy whiskey and cigars, while waiting for dinner...</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/IMG_8189.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_7595.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /><br /> <br /> Olga is a Travel and Lifestyle blogger based in London. Find out more on: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/liolaliola/">https://www.instagram.com/liolaliola/</a></div> 0 National Champagne Week https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-champagne-week/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-champagne-week/#comments Fri, 07 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-champagne-week/ The UK has long been Champagne’s leading export market, in fact, holding the number one slot for almost every year since the end of the Second World War, believe it or not. The UK has long been Champagne’s leading export market, in fact, holding the number one slot for almost every year since the end of the Second World War, believe it or not.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_423.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">With this in mind, National Champagne Week 2016, founded by <a href="http://searcys.co.uk/">Searcys</a>, aims to celebrate the rich diversity of Champagne across some of the UK&rsquo;s most iconic venues through a week-long celebration of accessible and approachable experiences for everyone to enjoy. &nbsp;Check out National Champagne Week&rsquo;s <a href="https://twitter.com/champagne_week">Twitter</a> &amp; <a href="https://www.instagram.com/champagne_week/">Instagram</a> to keep up with the latest.<br /> <br /> <strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s Favourite Champagne Houses:</strong><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.bobbobricard.com/">Bob Bob Richard</a><br /> <br /> Equipped with a &ldquo;press for champagne&rdquo; button on every table, Bob Bob Richard is famous for pouring more champagne than any other restaurant in the United Kingdom.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/bobbobricard-wine-01.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <div style="text-align: right;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Image: <a href="http://www.bobbobricard.com/">Bob Bob Ricard.</a></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><a href="https://www.bubbledogs.co.uk/">Bubbledogs</a><br /> <br /> Bubbledogs is a champagne house that does not serve caviar. Instead Hot Dogs and Champagne. It sounds like an odd juxtaposition but to us it&rsquo;s a match made in heaven. Bubbledogs offers a menu of 14 hot dogs&nbsp;and some of the world&#39;s greatest grower Champagnes.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://searcysstpancras.co.uk/champagne-bar/">Searcys St Pancras Champagne Bar</a><br /> <br /> Putting some glamour back into railway travel, the 96m champagne bar at St Pancras station is touted as the longest champagne bar in Europe but in winter months it could also be known as the coldest champagne bar, thanks to its large open entrances. But a glass of bubbly is a much better send off than a Big Mac and Coke. And the design of the bar, heated banquette seating and superb view of St Pancras&#39;s vaunted ceiling and passers-by make it a keeper even in the colder months.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.champagneplusfromage.co.uk/">Champagne &amp; Fromage</a><br /> <br /> France has some of the best exports we couldn&rsquo;t live without. Good smelly cheese and champagne. Champagne + Fromage have married these two delights and created a shop and bistro that&#39;s entirely cheese and wine. Their focal point is their champagne which has won over 25 awards. Clueless bubbly lovers are given a chance to learn their way around the treasured grape with a monthly champagne tasting session. Enjoy their sixteen different champagnes and take part in the champagne afternoon tea which adds fizz to a British tradition.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 THE BUTLER IN CONVERSATION WITH DAPHNE BUGEY https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/ https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/#comments Fri, 07 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT HQ Writer… Erin https://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/ How Daphne Bugey started out in the perfume industry... How Daphne Bugey started out in the perfume industry...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_409.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: How did you start out in the</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Perfume industry?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I studied perfumery at ISIPCA,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the perfumery school located</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">in Versailles, France and was</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">trained by Firmenich during</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the internship program. I learnt</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">a lot from different Perfumers</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">about the technical side of</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">my craft as well as on raw</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">materials before I joined the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Fine Fragrance team in Paris.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What drew you to the world</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>of fragrance at such a young</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>age? We read that you knew</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>you wanted to become a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>perfumer at age 10.</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I knew from the age of</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">10 that I was destined to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">become a perfumer as I was</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">passionate about everything</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">that constitutes the world</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">of fragrance. Always on the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">lookout for scents, I collected</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">bottles and advertisements.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Describe your style. Is your</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>personality reflected in the</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fragrances you create?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: Like an actress who embraces</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the character she is playing, I</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">adapt to each subject I work</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">for. I enter the brand universe</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">that I will translate into scents</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">with my own sensibility, my</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">own perception, experience</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">and intuition. Once I have an</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">understanding of the brand</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">and I feel the fit with the team,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">then I can impart my own</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">personality.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: How long does it take you to</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>develop a fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: It really depends on the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">project. Developing a new</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">fragrance takes me between</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">one week and four years&hellip;</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What are your favourite</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>materials and scents to</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>work with?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I have a lot of favourite</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">ingredients; from citrus to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">woods, rose (reinventing rose</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">is a never ending story!),</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">spices such as ginger, to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">sensuous vanilla and ambrox.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: When did you first discover</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I knew Penhaligon&rsquo;s by</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">reputation as the iconic</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">British perfumer from the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Victorian era. This new project</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">is breaking the codes with a</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">totally innovative approach.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Do you have a favourite</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I like Juniper Sling created</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">by Olivier Cresp. Choosing</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">amongst the new collection,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Duke is the one.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What was it like working on a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fragrance that is based on a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fictional character? How did</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>this inspire you?</strong></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: We had a lot of fun. This new</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">original concept was very</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">exciting as it was offbeat.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Characters were described</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">with many crucial details with</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">clear direction. I quickly had</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">a clear vision of my creation. I</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">imagined how to translate the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">atmosphere.</span></div> 0