The Penhaligon's Times http://www.penhaligons.com Mon, 26 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT http://www.penhaligons.com en hourly 1 Little Known London: Lady Blanche http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/ladyblanche/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/ladyblanche/#comments Fri, 23 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/ladyblanche/ "Charmingly dangerous“ "Charmingly dangerous“<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_413.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;<br /> Lady Blanche visits London. Where will she go? What hidden gems will she find?<br /> <br /> Lady Blanche loves to take herself off towards the river where she enjoys the majesty of the river Thames. The palaces and Westminster are left behind as she ventures west towards Chelsea. The Royal borough is home to beautiful bridges and green spaces which enjoys before she arrives at her favourite place in London, The Chelsea Physic Garden.<br /> <br /> The small and genteel streets around the Kings&rsquo; Road are quainter and smaller than Mayfair but the white stucco creates a lighter feel. History is all around you as you pass The Royal Hospital, with its Chelsea Pensioners walking around as a throwback to Restoration England and the coronation of King Charles II. The river Thames tells a story and reveals a working life of breweries, porcelain manufacturing and even baking. The Chelsea bun was baked in the area and the only hint of its existence is in the street named Bunhouse Place. Chelsea is like this; there is no uninterrupted gentility but a mix of working homes and the stately and beautiful houses so brilliantly summed up by historian and writer, Thomas Carlyle, who in 1834 described Chelsea as &ldquo;a singular heterogeneous kind of spot, very dirty and confused in some places, quite beautiful in others, abounding in antiquities and traces of great men&rdquo;.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> On Swan Walk, through a small doorway, magic happens. The Chelsea Physic Garden is so well hidden that you would not even guess it was there. It is surrounded by a wall which doesn&rsquo;t give much away. This beautiful garden enjoys a clement climate allowing a wide variety of plants to be grown here. Leased to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, this is where Lady Blanche&rsquo;s real interest lies. She is often seen walking through the garden and enjoying the colours and fragrances of the flowers but more and more, she is seen poring over the recipes for the medicines and antidotes that if administered incorrectly will cause enormous harm and even death. She is careful not to be seen to be writing anything down!</span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London: Lord George http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/#comments Fri, 16 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/ At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends... At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_415.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Imagine if you will, our patriarch, Lord George. Bored of roaming the grounds of his country estate, and so hot foots it to London. But where is his space? Somewhere he feels at home and understood. Perhaps he spends his days based in the conservative environs of St James&rsquo;s.<br /> <br /> James&rsquo;s Palace or the court of St James was the place where gentlemen came to be seen and mix with the royal household hoping for an important role or to make that important connection. Clubs started here to allow gentlemen to have somewhere to stay and to mix with other gentlemen. At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends.<br /> <br /> St James&rsquo;s clubs and houses are solid, respectable and reassuringly expensive. They represent the link to the past. The Tudor palace of St James&rsquo;s is now the centre of royal operations and provides apartments to the various members of the extended royal family. Its tumultuous past has luckily gone and it truly represents the establishment. As we walk along Pall Mall, the houses and clubs are closed to those who are not in the know and in the right power circles. You will never spy someone out of place in this area. The back of the houses, the mews, the courts are where the servants and the tradesmen do their work and they will rarely be seen in the grand backdrop of Pall Mall or St James&rsquo;s Street.<br /> <br /> <br /> For those lucky enough to be able to promenade in the area, look up. Every house is a variation on another. Note the size and grandeur of the windows at a time when making glass on this scale was prohibitively expensive and see the doorways, wide enough for even the most well-fed aristo to pass through comfortably. The snuffers for torches, the metal foot scrapers and the half-moon shaped windows above the door are details that tell you of a time when lighting was poor and even the most genteel couldn&rsquo;t avoid the horses! Off the main streets, you can enjoy the garden squares providing space, greenery and relics from a bygone era.</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 The Tragedy of Lord George http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lordgeorge/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lordgeorge/#comments Fri, 09 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lordgeorge/ Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability being, of course, the key to a happy marriage. Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute. His penchant for muttering “ the flesh is weak ” over the breakfast kippers is entirely without explanation. Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability being, of course, the key to a happy marriage. Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute. His penchant for muttering “ the flesh is weak ” over the breakfast kippers is entirely without explanation.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_414.jpg"<br/><br/><h2 style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</h2> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The Tragedy of Lord George</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">being, of course, the key to a happy marriage.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His penchant for muttering &ldquo; the flesh is weak &rdquo; over the breakfast</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">kippers is entirely without explanation.</span></span></div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Masculine and elegant &mdash; with a hint of rum.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Powerful, rich and ever-so welcoming &mdash; &ldquo; do come in,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">I&rsquo;m sure we&rsquo;ve met before &rdquo;. For the well-to-do who are able, stable,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">reassuring &mdash; but also lots of fun. A solid shoulder to cry on (was that a</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">protective hand I felt on my _ ?) This is a fragrance for the man whose</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">reputation lives on.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Not quite Latin &mdash; but full of love nevertheless.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Woody Ambery Fougere</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Brandy - Shaving Soap -Tonka bean</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 THE BUTLER IN CONVERSATION WITH KRISTJANA WILLIAMS, http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/#comments Fri, 09 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/ Penhaligon’s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana’s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints. Penhaligon’s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana’s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_410.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Penhaligon&rsquo;s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana&rsquo;s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints.<br /> <br /> <strong>B: When did you know you wanted to become an artist?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: At the age of six I was constantly drawing and painting, however, when I reached my teenage years I moved away from the idea as I never dreamed I could make a career out of being an artist. Then in my midtwenties, I went back to study graphic design at Central Saint Martins, majoring in illustration. Outline Editions gallery picked up on my work and it went from there.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What inspires you/what were your earliest influences?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I think the earliest influences are the most interesting as you are not really aware of them till you look back. My childhood in Iceland is very much embedded in my work. The nature in Iceland is clearly portrayed, the starkness of the black and white treatment of the engravings looking to the frozen-over sea and black sandy beaches. My love of colour has also been influenced by Iceland, where I craved light and colour during the long, dark winters.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Describe your style.</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Modern engraver.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Can you tell us a little about your creative process: how does an idea turn into an illustration &ndash; and how long does it take?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: This varies immensely, sometimes a piece can be brewing for years then all of a sudden it comes to life over a few weeks, whereas other pieces are constantly changing and evolving and take many months to take shape. There is no perfect formula. It all starts with a lot of research and planning.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: When did you first discover Penhaligon&rsquo;s?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Many years ago in the Burlington Arcade store.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Do you have a favourite </strong><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I recently visited the Penhaligon&rsquo;s store inBurlington Arcade for a &lsquo;fragrance profiling&rsquo; appointment. The fragrance expert in the store asked me various questions about my tastes and lifestyle to find the Penhaligon&rsquo;s scent that would suit me the most &ndash; it was a truly wonderful experience! Juniper Sling is a favourite, due to its freshness and my love of gin! However, I couldn&rsquo;t just choose one and Halfeti is another favourite &ndash; it&rsquo;s so rich and deep, the perfect evening scent.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: The Victorian Era is a great </strong><strong>inspiration for you, is that </strong><strong>what first drew you to the </strong><strong>Portraits project?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Penhaligon&rsquo;s history alone was enough.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What inspiration did you take </strong><strong>from the characters?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: The richer the narrative the more creative I can get.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What you&rsquo;re favourite portrait </strong><strong>character/fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Lord George.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: If you could be one of the </strong><strong>Portraits characters, who </strong><strong>would you be and why?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I feel a close affinity to Lord George, being the head of the family. He is also the first character I worked on for this project, so I am drawn to him as it was my first introduction into the Penhaligon&rsquo;s Portraits world.</span></div> 0 A WORD FROM THE BUTLER http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/#comments Thurs, 08 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/ No one is terribly sure when this all happened, sometimes it’s best to forget… No one is terribly sure when this all happened, sometimes it’s best to forget…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_408.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Somewhere in the rolling hills of the English countryside, nestled<br /> under a majestic canopy of oaks, the sun is gently rising over a country<br /> mansion whose foundations date back to shortly after the arrival of William<br /> the Conqueror. (Or thereabouts.)<br /> <br /> Two or three domestic servants are arduously at work drawing baths, opening curtains, lighting fires and<br /> viciously beating carpets in preparation for the first family gathering of<br /> the day.&nbsp; The happy delight of their first<br /> greeting. But is there more to this scene than meets the eye? &lsquo;Manners<br /> maketh the man&rsquo;, but are they also useful as a tool of subterfuge?<br /> What really lies behind the good manners of Britain&rsquo;s aristocracy?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Soon it is time to find out&hellip;A VERY BRITISH AFFAIR.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 AN OLFACTORY FICTION http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction/#comments Fri, 26 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction/ Their presence is never far… and the perfume of scandal brightens the air. Their presence is never far… and the perfume of scandal brightens the air.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_407.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Somewhere in the rolling hills of the English countryside, nestled<br /> under a majestic canopy of oaks, the sun is gently rising over a country<br /> mansion whose foundations date back to shortly after the arrival of William<br /> the Conqueror. (Or thereabouts.)<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Coming this September to a Penhaligon&rsquo;s near you&hellip;</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5647(1).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5642.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5658.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> A VERY BRITISH AFFAIR.</span></div> 0 THE FLESH IS WEAK http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-flesh-is-weak/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-flesh-is-weak/#comments Weds, 24 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-flesh-is-weak/ "Faithful to king and country"... "Faithful to king and country"...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_406.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Coming soon to a Penhaligon&#39;s near you...</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> 0 A Summer Essential http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-summer-essential/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-summer-essential/#comments Tues, 23 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-summer-essential/ We've got summer scented and we're not the only one who agrees. Lavinia Cernau shares her love affair with Luna. We've got summer scented and we're not the only one who agrees. Lavinia Cernau shares her love affair with Luna.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_404.jpg"<br/><br/><p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <br /> <span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; line-height: 15.6px;">My daily essentials this summer and the pinkest light filtering from my window at dusk. Love this time of day when the heat is shifting and the moon is boldly taking her spot in the sky.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/" style="color: rgb(77, 77, 77); text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Penhaligon&#39;s</a>&nbsp;newest fragrance,&nbsp;Luna, was love at first sniff. A dark woody base entwines orange bigarade oil and juniper berry to offer a fresh yet sensual crispness. Instant hypnosis for these late summer night walks in the cooled down city.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/DSCF3462.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Courtesy of: <a href="http://laviniacernau.com/journal/summer-essentials">Lavinia Cernau</a></span></span></p> 0 Spencer House, London http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spencer-house/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spencer-house/#comments Tues, 23 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spencer-house/ This September brings incredibly exciting times for Penhaligon&#39s and it's not long now until we reveal all. We are now in the throws of final preparations and last week&nbsp;we found ourselves in the splendour of Spencer House. This September brings incredibly exciting times for Penhaligon&#39s and it's not long now until we reveal all. We are now in the throws of final preparations and last week&nbsp;we found ourselves in the splendour of Spencer House.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_395.jpg"<br/><br/>&nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Spencer House is a breathtaking&nbsp;eighteenth-century aristocratic private palace in London, overlooking Green Park.&nbsp;If you have a chance to visit we highly recommend a guided tour, available <a href="http://www.spencerhouse.co.uk/book-your-tour/">every Sunday</a>.</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>Here are some little gems we thought you&rsquo;d like&hellip;</em></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5615.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> &nbsp;<br /> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The Regency chandelier made by John Blades, referred to as <em>&quot;the great glass man of Ludgate-hill&quot;</em>,</span><span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;dates back to 1815.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 16px;">The chandelier in the Dining Room is made of faceted </span><span style="font-size: 16px;">glass and gilt metal with original storm shades. It comes from the Palace of Satra, Maharashtra, India. Blades, later </span><a href="https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/53130/pair-of-lustres" style="font-size: 16px;">Blades &amp; Jones</a><span style="font-size: 16px;">, were the leading manufacturers of glass chandeliers in the early nineteenth century.</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5609.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">They produced much for the eastern market, including diplomatic gifts from George III to the Sultan of Turkey, Nizam of Hyderabad and Homerjee Bomanjee of Bombay, and this chandelier is thought to have been of the latter gift as Bombay is the capital of Maharashtra.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The pair of giltwood pier tables in the Dining Room were designed by William Chambers (1723-1796) and made by Robert Ansell in 1773. They are veneered with alabaster tops above a fluted frieze centred with a shell flanked by swags of foliage. The V&amp;A currently showcases the giltwood pier tables, <a href="http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O8156/table-chambers-william-sir/">see here.</a><br /> <br /> The pair of pier glasses above the tables are from the late 18th century and were designed by John Yenn and made by Sefferin Alken.<br /> <br /> The frames are carved with guilloche and enclosing in the upper section a mirror plate with applied neo-classical carving centred by an urn with anthemion cresting flanked by swags of husk and drapery above scrolls of foliage. The tables and the pier glasses were made for the Grand Cabinet at Blenheim Palace. They are on loan from the Rothschild Foundation to Spencer House. </span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>Photos Courtesy of &nbsp;Spencer House Limited</em></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Finding Your Signature Fragrance at Penhaligon's - Courtesy of Urban Pixxels http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/#comments Thurs, 11 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/ Our consultation offers an authentic way of discovering a special fragrance and a true way of wearing it. Our consultation offers an authentic way of discovering a special fragrance and a true way of wearing it.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_400.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;">There&#39;s a famous study about the &#39;paradox of choice&#39; that states too many choices (in this case varieties of jam at a supermarket) will lead to decision making paralysis and unhappiness. So far I&rsquo;ve managed to buy jam without getting depressed, but when it comes to perfume, this is exactly what happens to me. There are too many options. After spraying some different fragrances&nbsp;on a piece of paper&nbsp;I don&rsquo;t know what I like and don&rsquo;t like anymore, and I walk out of the store with the same perfume I&rsquo;ve been wearing for over a decade.</span></span></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Finding-Your-Signature-Fragrance.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></span> <div style="text-align: left;"> &nbsp;</div> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">I have always liked the idea of wearing different fragrances for different occasions, but I never really found something else that smelled and felt like &lsquo;me&rsquo;, so I&rsquo;d kind of given up.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">But then Penhaligon&rsquo;s invited me to their store in&nbsp;the Burlington Arcade for a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); font-family: inherit; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">perfume&nbsp;profiling session</a>&nbsp;to find my signature fragrance. Someone else is going to help me find a perfume that I like? That actually sounds like a lot of fun!</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Hammam.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;" /></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">And it was. Like all the shops at the Burlington Arcade it&rsquo;s quite small inside, so I was guided to a separate, charming looking room on the first floor where we could spray all the perfumes we wanted without being interrupted. From the Hamman Bouquet, the first scent that William Penhaligon created in 1872 to the more modern ones.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: right; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Burlington-Arcade-Room.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">When I saw all the different bottles &ndash; that look beautiful by the way &ndash; I instantly&nbsp;started to feel worried. Am I going to try them all?! You&rsquo;re not, and that&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s so great to do this with an expert. She asked me a couple of simple questions and based on my answers she knew exactly what perfume to let me try first. And I liked it. How did she do that?!</span></span></p> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Finding-Your-Signature-Fragrance-Perfume-Bottles.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 304px;" /></span></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: left;"> &nbsp;</div> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Based on my feedback she let me try a number of other perfumes that ended up on a yes, maybe or no pile.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Before doing this I don&rsquo;t think I would have been able to describe what I like or don&rsquo;t like in a fragrance. But because she told me about the different&nbsp;notes&nbsp;and the great stories behind each bottle, very quickly I knew what I was looking for.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Once we had found my favourites, it was time to try four of them on my skin. Which is so important, because the one I liked the most on paper wasn&rsquo;t my favorite anymore when I sprayed it on my pulse. And the one she gave me as a <em>&ldquo;it&rsquo;s a bit different than the others, but I think you&rsquo;ll like it&rdquo; </em>came out as the winner:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/opus-1870/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); font-family: inherit; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">Opus 1870</a>.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">It has the fragrance notes&nbsp;that I apparently like: citrus and black pepper, but it is more elegant than what I normally wear. And yet, it was still me. And since I was looking for something to compliment my loyal L&rsquo;Eau d&rsquo;Issey, I decided to go with this one.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Bottle-Opus-1870-Hands.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Who would have thought that shopping for perfume could be such a fun experience without any stress. They don&rsquo;t offer these profiling sessions in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">all their stores</a>, but if you&rsquo;re like me and are struggling to find your signature fragrance, then I can highly recommend contacting Penhaligon&rsquo;s to book&nbsp;your own session.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Signature-Scent-Hands-Perfume.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;" /></span></span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="text-align: left; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">To book your own complimentary&nbsp;Fragrance Profiling consultation call </span><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/" style="text-align: left; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;">your nearest Penhaligon&#39;s Store.</a></span></p> </div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Courtesy of:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.urbanpixxels.com/penhaligons/ ">Urban Pixxels</a>.</span></div> 0 Afternoon Tea Week http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/afternoon-tea-week/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/afternoon-tea-week/#comments Tues, 09 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/afternoon-tea-week/ It seems the whole of the UK are rejoicing in Afternoon Tea Week. It seems the whole of the UK are rejoicing in Afternoon Tea Week.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_394.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">There are few British traditions more decadent than traditional Afternoon Tea. Afternoon Tea Week gets underway from August 10th-13th, during which we pay particular homage to <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a>,&nbsp;our very first gourmand fragrance which plays with an olfactory palette inspired by the delights of high tea, accompanied by the heady bouquet of the first sweet Spring flowers. Blooming marvellous!&nbsp;</span><br /> <span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a> boasts delicious notes of </span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">Chantilly, Frangipani and Brown Sugar blended with violet leaves, orange blossom absolute and jasmine sambac, rounded with the deep, Oriental richness of Benzoin Siam and Ambrox.<br /> <br /> Previously we scoured London for the finest, eclectic selection of</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11pt;"><span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;Afternoon Tea, which you can find <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-afternoon-teas-in-london/">here.</a><br /> <br /> It was difficult to choose but our personal favourite is <a href="https://sketch.london/#gsc.tab=0">Sketch,</a>&nbsp;a complex and unique site tucked away in Mayfair. Sketch offers a blend of eccentric Britishness and continental experimentalism.</span>&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11pt;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/sketch-afternoon-tea.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Where is your favourite Afternoon Tea location?</span></div> 0 The Penhaligon’s Fragrance Table http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/#comments Thurs, 04 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/ The Inspiration Behind Penhaligon's Unique Fragrance Tables. The Inspiration Behind Penhaligon's Unique Fragrance Tables.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_393.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">It was four years ago that the greatest show on earth came to London. The 22nd July marked the day of our incredible opening ceremony of the 2012 London Olympic Games. An incredible four hours of artistic display represented Britain&#39;s Green and pleasant Land, Industrial Revolution, literary heritage, popular music and culture. And who can forget the nod to our treasured National Health Service and Great Ormond Street Hospital. And of course the cameo appearance from Her Majesty the Queen!&nbsp;And there was the Olympic Cauldron. A stunning work of art by British designer Thomas Heatherwic.<br /> <br /> The 204 long elegant stems gracefully rose and converged to form a great flame - a symbol of the coming together of 204 nations.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Fragrance_Table_Details4X5A1997.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px; font-size: 16px;" /></span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Well, did you know that our very own fragrance tables were inspired by Heatherwic&#39;s cauldron? Our own little masterpieces. Every Penhaligon&rsquo;s store today has a fragrance profiling table as a centre piece showcasing our 34 scents and connecting them as the entire Penhaligon&#39;s collection.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/3.PNG" style="width: 500px; height: 481px;" /></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/2.PNG" style="width: 500px; height: 447px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Have you seen one yet? They take pride of place in the <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=248">Canary Wharf </a>store or our soon to be re-opened flagship store on<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=145"> Regent Street. </a>Or if you&#39;re over the pond then all our new <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/?validate=0&amp;longitude=0&amp;lattitude=0&amp;dummyInput=&amp;countryChoice=US&amp;sl_postcode=">US stores</a> feature them.<br /> <br /> Why not come and visit and try our delightful fragrances too!</span><br /> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Trade Routes - Lothair http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-lothair/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-lothair/#comments Tues, 02 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-lothair/ We continue our Trade Routes series finding out about the rich and luxurious goods that sailed into London, inspiring Lothair We continue our Trade Routes series finding out about the rich and luxurious goods that sailed into London, inspiring Lothair<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_390.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">England has enjoyed a long-term love affair with India. Since the first tentative steps onto this sub-continent, the colours, spices and scents have intoxicated us. It was so different and far-removed from the conservative, parochial world left back in Old Blighty. The entire nation slowly became hooked and India started leaving its indelible mark on our lives and in our hearts. Here the inspiration of India is palpable within <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Lothair</strong></u></a>, a delightful fragrance from one of Penhaligon&rsquo;s great perfumers.<br /> <br /> The long journeys to and from the subcontinent inspired two very definite English drinks, gin &amp; tonic and tea. These have united in <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Lothair</strong></u></a>. This delightful fragrance begins life on the open seas with a salty infusion of juniper, cardamom and grapefruit, classic botanicals of gin. Lothair first takes on the subtle hints of gin, the quintessential thirst quencher created on the long journey to this far-flung part of the British Empire. A little piece of Great Britain was to be found in the very un-British climate and backdrop of India. The aroma of crushed juniper berries are emboldened by grapefruit and bergamot that add a lively gin/tonic top note.<br /> It is as fresh as sea air and as clear as a ship&rsquo;s bell but as the notes settle a new aroma is ascending &ndash; tea.<br /> <br /> Little by little the black tea takes hold and the journey continues hand in hand with the bergamot releasing Earl Grey. This marks the start of the return journey where the streamlined clippers shipped tea back to London as quickly as possible. The delights of the plantations in Darjeeling and Assam were picked in delicate haste, packed up and sent to the major ports including Bombay. Once aboard the clippers it was all speed ahead to Europe as the first leaves to reach Bristol and London were sold at premium prices. There was no second place. Your fortunes were made or lost on how fast your ship negotiated the seas back home. The Cutty Sark was the fastest clipper in the world and no one could match the speed at which she brought her cargo home. From the moment the tea was packed on board, it was down to the captain to get his precious cargo back to England safely and quickly.<br /> <br /> The true value of the cargo is realized as it hits East India Docks in London. Opened in 1802, the annual value of tea coming through this dock was &pound;30m a year. A staggering amount at this time. Tea had to be treated as a precious commodity, something we need to contemplate as we grab our teabags to make a brew. The English East India Company created stunning warehouses in the East End; these were as secure as any prison. You can still see these warehouses in New Street opposite Liverpool Street station and through into the covered area of Devonshire Square. These beautiful buildings date from 1820 and are now offices, retail and luxury housing. It is amazing that they are still in tact after WWII and the zealous rebuilding dream of the London County Council.<br /> <br /> As the journey comes to a conclusion, the tea is unloaded and the vessels sit empty and forlorn amongst the docks of London&rsquo;s historic port. The smell of tea subsides and the notes of smaller cargoes of musk and vanilla come to the fore. These sweet notes mingle with the drydown of wenge, cedarwood and oakmoss reminiscent of the smell of the ship&rsquo;s timbers as they relax after a long voyage at sea.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 The Secret History of Guinness http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/#comments Thurs, 28 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/ Did you know...Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness. Did you know...Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_367.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Here we are continuing our journey through the tastes of London...<br /> <br /> Guinness is one of the world&rsquo;s most famous brands; Porter is not. Guinness&rsquo; popular advertising lures you in with the two-tone appeal of its black liquid and creamy head. Porter looks the same and tastes similar but is really only known to lovers of stout and artisanal brews. Guinness is as Irish as St Patrick&rsquo;s Day and Porter is as London as tube delays. Guinness is the big brother who leaves the bosom of his family and makes a rip-roaring success of his life while the rest of the family who all look alike and have the same upbringing never quite make it.<br /> <br /> Porter was brewed in London from the early 1700&rsquo;s and was the perfect drink for the labour intensive work of London&rsquo;s dock and market porters who needed the calories and the vitamins that were packed into each malty glass. It was an incredibly important drink. However, most people do not realise that Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness. He probably enjoyed the drink in one of the many pubs around Smithfield&rsquo;s that became famous for serving an early morning pint of Porter with breakfast. There was even a local brewery in Chiswell Street that would have provided a steady stream of Porter to local hostelries. Arthur certainly had vision; he took the recipe back to Ireland and created a similar beverage.&nbsp; Porter&rsquo;s future was set, it would become one of the most famous beers no one has ever heard of!</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/PENHALIGONS103_B%26WLondon_095.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">While Guinness took off in Ireland, by the mid nineteenth century, the dark stouts started going out of fashion in London. People were becoming increasingly aware of contaminated water, fancied the clearer, golden beers that looked like they had been made out of pure spring water rather than the Thames finest filth! Porter&rsquo;s appeal was waning and stout&rsquo;s future was on a dark, slippery slope.<br /> <br /> But as with all things, our taste in beer keeps changing. We have always moved from light to dark beers and back again. With a lot of work by CAMRA (The campaign for real ale), the 1990&rsquo;s saw us turn our back on the ersatz lagers of the 70&rsquo;s and 80&rsquo;s and put us back on to bitter, ales, milds and stouts. Even Porter is making its way back into the mainstream in Fuller&rsquo;s pubs where you don&rsquo;t have to ask for it as if it were something embarrassing you needed from the chemist. Quality beers and independent breweries have made a come back. Porter will rise again!</span><br /> 0 Trade Routes - Halfeti http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-halfeti/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-halfeti/#comments Fri, 22 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-halfeti/ We discover the story and inspiration behind our exotic Trade Routes Halfeti fragrance We discover the story and inspiration behind our exotic Trade Routes Halfeti fragrance<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_389.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">The Turkish town of Halfeti is a wonderful mix of Byzantine, Armenian, Egyptian and Ottoman heritage and a town well versed to trading with the world. The Levant Company was set up to create a relationship with the Ottoman Empire bringing exotic goods to English society. From spices to soft leathers, cloth to coffee, heavy damasks to golden currants, this trading company had control of the most desirable commodities of this region. Our relationship grew, the Ottoman Empire was intoxicating and by the 19th century, London&rsquo;s aristocracy was in awe of this fading power. Great fortunes were to be made in the valuable raw silks and cottons that were considered more stylish than the home-grown silks of Soho and Spitalfields.<br /> <br /> Of all the commodities traded in and around the town of Halfeti, the most unusual was their black rose, the rarest of flowers, which originates from the nearby banks of the Euphrates. These roses bloom once a year and it is the combination of its terroir and the pH of the river that creates a rose of the darkest shade of red. This red develops into a soft black in the hot suns of the summer. The Halfeti black rose was most covetable especially to the gothic Victorians. The oil extracted from the rose petals forms the mid note of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Halfeti</strong></u></a> is used to dramatic and mysterious effect.<br /> <br /> The English obsession with the Orient continued; they loved the unusual skylines, dominated by domes and minarets, the grand kasbahs confusing to even the most intrepid explorers. These emporia were filled exotic sounds, sights and with delightful smoke and perfumes of which London couldn&rsquo;t get enough. The Levant traders or pashas negotiated the souks and brought out the best of the bazaar, the scents of the trade route and some rich observations of Turkish and Arabic culture.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Halfeti&rsquo;s</strong></u></a> piquancy comes from such spice treasures as cardamom, nutmeg, cinnamon and saffron. These were often seen in colourful powdery mounds in the medinas throughout this exotic empire. This was not trade on a large scale; you didn&rsquo;t need much. A tiny pinch was all that was required to create a little oriental mysticism.<br /> <br /> The journey through the Persian Gulf continues with the fragrance relaxing into dusky patchouli en route to an alluring musky base of resins, oud and amber. The oud is at its most subtle mixed with the velvety softness of cedar and sandalwoods. These final notes are like watching glowing embers at the end of a wood fire or seeing the sun set on the Turkish coast as these precious cargoes head to England.<br /> <br /> As the ships made their way along the Thames Estuary, you could see the ports burst into activity; bristling with excitement at the anticipation of every shipment from Turkey. Spices were divvied up between chefs, cooks and fragrance-makers. Fabrics were hastily dropped off at dressmakers where seamstresses would fashion clothes in the Ottoman style. There was even competition between men and women over who commanded the plumes of feathers and turbans. English society could not get enough of the exotic goods of the Ottoman Empire.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 The Fall and Rise of Chocolate http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/#comments Weds, 20 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/ Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate’s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood – just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country. Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate’s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood – just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_383.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Britons tastes are changing, especially when it comes to chocolate. There has been a definite rise in demand for dark chocolate with a higher cocoa content. Just look at the gourmet chocolate shops that have become more popular in recent years including William Curley&rsquo;s exotic creations and bars of Rococo&rsquo;s Grenadian delicious darkness. When you think you are having a treat, in fact, you are eating the latest health food (when eaten in small quantities and when accompanied by other healthy, whole foods!) It is only the high cocoa chocolate without the milky sugary taste that gets the healthy thumbs up which is great for lovers of Green &amp; Blacks but not so good for Cadbury&rsquo;s Dairy Milk fans.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate&rsquo;s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood &ndash; just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Europeans have always been enamoured of chocolate since it was first introduced from the New World in the late sixteenth century. It was expensive and became the drink of choice of noble families. In 1657, a Frenchman opened a chocolate house in an East End alley and Londoners started visiting. First of all, it was a slow trickle but after a series of pamphlets were written eschewing the health benefits of this beverage, London fell for it hook, line and sinker. At a time when we were not so taken with Gallic charm, he had us at &ldquo;aphrodisiac&rdquo;! Chocolate was certainly sold on the assumption that it would boost fertility and desire but also the more practical Brits also considered its other benefits. It would aid digestion, reverse ageing, and alleviate a cracking hangover; something many people still believe!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> London sold this drink through its network of coffee houses where milk was added to make it more palatable and cheaper. Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753), remembered in the eponymous street names in Knightsbridge and Chelsea, visited Jamaica and became obsessed with this bitter health drink. In true British form, the recipe was altered and sugar, eggs, milk, spices including cinnamon and vanilla were added which probably reduced the impact of the health benefits but when you consider how long Sir Hans lived, maybe there was still some truth in it!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Chocolate wasn&rsquo;t sold in bar form until 1847 when Joseph Fry mixed cocoa, cocoa powder and sugar to make a moldable paste. This was the start of its mass appeal. Cocoa has always been expensive and the English were very happy if there was less of the cocoa mass and more milk and sugar &ndash; we even celebrate this with an image of a &lsquo;glass and a half&rsquo; on one well known brand.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Queen&rsquo;s favourite chocolatier, holder of a Royal Warrant and London&rsquo;s oldest chocolate brand, Charbonnel et Walker has been creating a whole range of chocolates since 1875 and has been enjoying a renaissance especially since the Queen&rsquo;s 90<sup>th</sup> birthday. Some of their customers are attracted to the traditional and somewhat nostalgic chocolates including the English Rose and Violet truffles enrobed in dark chocolate. However, the English can never quite shake off their love of the sweet confection as their recent best seller is the pink Marc de Champagne truffle &ndash; pale pink on the outside and about as far removed from a health food as you can get!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="Chocolate shop" src="/images/categories/PENHALIGONS102_LittleKnownLondon_182.jpg" style="width: 550px; height: 366px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">To muse more about our taste in chocolate, go to Sloane Square and walk along the King&rsquo;s Road, taking a detour to The Chelsea Physic Garden. This botanical garden, opened in 1673 was built on land donated by Sir Hans Sloane, the man who popularised milk chocolate. When you have had chance to think everything that has happened to the humble chocolate bar, pop into Rococo&rsquo;s first shop on The King&rsquo;s Road for a taste of the real Mckoy.</span><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Trade Routes - As Sawira http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/#comments Fri, 15 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/ As Sawira is as old as time but as modern as today. As Sawira is as old as time but as modern as today.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_388.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><br /> <u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a> is as old as time but as modern as today. The sense of eternity, of continuity where old world meets new is apparent from the first inhalation. As the bottle is opened, the freshness of bergamot and saffron are released. Hints of the sea wake up the senses and before the bitter herbal notes of absinthe and davana take hold like a Moroccan dawn.<br /> <br /> Essaouira (also known as As Sawira) is Morocco&rsquo;s principal port. Nestled on the Atlantic coast, it is a short journey from the souks of Marrakesh. This has been a favourite trading post of Europeans including the English since the late Middle Ages. The scene has changed little over the past few hundred years. The fishermen with their dawn catch are still followed by seabirds ready to fight over a dropped fish or two. Both locals and visitors queue to get a taste of the simple sardines that are grilled on the quayside. Through the smoke and the bustle of the harbour, you can see dockworkers loading and unloading roughly packaged boxes belying the exotic contents that lie within. Inbound curios arrive from Timbuktu and beyond, spices arrive by caravan from the East. These collide on the piers, ready to be packed up and sent off to the lovers of all things Oriental.<br /> <br /> <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/">As Sawira</a></strong></u> intensifies like the rising sun, opening the tones of roses, carnations and jasmine. This burst of flora emboldened by clove and cardamom is sunny and virile. As the sun continues to rise in the sky, work slows down on the quayside as the men keep out of the heat in the shade. Amber and resin are the shadow notes of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a>; fixing the warmth as the intensity shifts to an element of spice. &nbsp;<br /> <br /> Cloves and cardamom travelled the long desert trails into the arms of waiting Europeans ready to ship off to the wealthiest of clients. To the English, the trials of the caravan were romantic and heroic and stories were told that have added to the Middle Eastern mystique. As much as Europe loved spice, the world loved amber with traders earning great fortunes from these stones. The warmth and tactile qualities of the resin has given amber an elevated mystical status. No two pieces are ever the same and the link with pre-history has captured the imagination.<br /> <br /> As the sun plunges into the horizon and the trade wind strengthen, the warmth of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a> takes a more sensual turn. This is a time for lovers; musk and oud are amplified with every heartbeat. Sylvan notes of gaiacwood, sandalwood and cedarwood collude with patchouli and vanilla in a passionate embrace. These were new experiences for the English nose, adding fire to warm the cool Victorian sensibilities, to add ardour and zeal to the imagination when talk of such fervour wasn&rsquo;t allowed. This was a personal tale of passion, a clandestine love story that started in the deserts of North Africa and culminated in the boudoirs of the aristocracy.</span><br /> 0 The Warehouse of the World http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/#comments Mon, 11 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/ Penhaligon’s perfumers seem to have walked the historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London. Penhaligon’s perfumers seem to have walked the historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_387.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">A Victorian wandering around the docks and ports of London would first notice the hubbub and the sheer number of people working; a clamorous throng of porters, Lascars, carters, clerks, children and lingering ladies all negotiating, hauling, packing, unpacking, lifting, loading, talking, arguing and laughing. They would then start to perceive the aromas that changed with each arriving ship; from inky indigo to dusty coal, heady wines to smoky tea. The creaking of the ships gave little away as to the prizes held within. The more precious cargoes would have been docked at St Katherine&rsquo;s dock, closest to the City of London and in view of the Tower of London. Almost everything of value would have been docked here, brought in by the winds of trade. The fortunes of many relied on them, everyone hoping for the fruitful South Westerlies and dreading winds from the East that would hamper the arrival of the long-awaited ships.<br /> <br /> Substantial shipments of shells, sugar, ostrich feathers, dried fruit, herbs and spices were dwarfed by imports of baled wool, which were held in 32 acres of warehousing. This was the last leg of a journey of this raw material before it was sent North to England&rsquo;s weaving districts. Each year, 32,000 tonnes of tea arrived from China, India and Ceylon. The air never quite settling from the dust generated as the leaves were sorted and repackaged ready to send to the thirsty households of London and England.<br /> <br /> As London&rsquo;s role as the world&rsquo;s most important port was confirmed, a new series of enclosed docks emerged, protected from the river pirates and thieves who kept an eye on new cargoes arriving each day. The first was West India Quay with its high grey brick walls reminiscent of a fortress, keeping undesirables far from the warehouses full of Caribbean delights. The most important were sugar, dark and delicious molasses and sweet, warming rums, as dark as treacle but dangerously intoxicating. These highly desirable comestibles were guarded from those who knew their value. England couldn&rsquo;t get enough of the West Indies and their seductive selection of packaged and bottled sunshine.<br /> <br /> The warehousing and port grew and extended East consuming hovels and slums in its wake and opening up London more and more. Work and wealth came hand in hand with this expansion and the power and importance of London could not be questioned.<br /> <br /> Through all the high volume merchandise, the romance of trade was still tangible. The ships held secrets and stories of their time in the ports of the world and on the high seas. Exotic vanilla and cocoa from the Caribbean, carpets from Persia, rose oil from Turkey, batches of peppercorns, cardamoms and cloves from the East Indies mingling and colluding with the West. The docks would have welcomed flowers from all over the world, carnations, rose, jasmine, lavender and violets were greatly anticipated. Fruits including grapefruits, oranges, pomelos, figs and peaches were highly desirable and added to the melting pot of aromas that escaped the ships. Gentle hints of sandalwood, gaiacwood, cedarwoods and resins fought bravely to be noticed above the rougher tones of the ships timbers.<br /> <br /> Take a walk through the old docklands of East and South East London and enjoy the history of the Trade winds in their building and street names; The Cardamom Building, Cinnamon Wharf, Tobacco Dock, Vanilla and Sesame Court are just a tiny pinch of spice names that evoke a bygone era.<br /> <br /> Penhaligon&rsquo;s perfumers seem to have walked this historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London.</span><br /> 0 Our oldest street food? http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/oysters/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/oysters/#comments Mon, 11 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/oysters/ The Penhaligon’s Times is exploring taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad.. The Penhaligon’s Times is exploring taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad..<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_369.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span>The Penhaligon&rsquo;s Times explores taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad. In fact, there are some wonderful aromas to enjoy; food markets, intoxicating juniper-infused gin distilleries, cheese shops, rose gardens and a few shocks in the hot houses at Kew or in the flower beds of the Chelsea Physic Garden. So walk into a cheese shop and sample something new, visit one of London&rsquo;s famed oyster stalls and indulge in a Roman-London favourite or sip on a pint of Guinness and wonder at the origins of this most Irish of drinks &ndash; you may be in for a stout surprise!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This series begins with five pieces on the tastes of London and our oldest street food.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Walk along the river Thames at low tide and you will spot them; archaeologists who dig under London can&rsquo;t avoid them &ndash; oyster shells. These simple discarded carapaces have given historians a big clue about the average Londoner&rsquo;s diet through the ages.<br /> <br /> <br /> The English and, in particular, Londoners have enjoyed eating oysters for nearly 2,000 years and have the Romans to thank for the introduction. In fact, these invaders loved English oysters so much, that they would pack them in ice and send them back to Rome as a delicacy.<br /> <br /> It is probably no coincidence that the Romans made their capital city, Camulodunum or modern day Colchester. The Colchester or nearby Mersea oysters are still considered some of the finest in the country if not the world. In fact, Richard Haward seventh generation oysterman from West Mersea has been providing Londoners with oysters and clams for many years. Every day, oysters are brought up to London, some go to the best restaurants and oyster bars but the vast majority land at Borough where oyster aficionados gather in an orderly queue.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Oysters" src="/images/blogs/Oyster_2.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 457px;" /><br /> <br /> If you mention oysters to some people, most would imagine the simple yet decadent meal of the Bright Young Things of the 1920&rsquo;s. They would quaff champagne and slurp on the oysters as if they were going out of fashion! Some people are reminded of Casanova whose libido seemed to benefit from the 50 oysters he ate everyday for breakfast. However, some may not know that up until the mid nineteenth century, London&rsquo;s poor would have eaten vast quantities of these bivalves from the Thames until the river became too polluted. The two World Wars that followed also impacted on the oyster as the beds were neglected when the beaches became off limits and boats were requisitioned for the war effort. This neglect impacted on the price and the more expensive the oyster, the more fashionable they became!<br /> <br /> <img alt="Oysters" src="/images/blogs/Oyster_3.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 430px;" /><br /> <br /> Nowadays, oysters are carefully harvested from the estuaries around the UK. If you wish to try delicious oysters at their source, venture to West Mersea, a small island off the coast of Essex and get there early to book your table at The Company Shed. You will be able to enjoy all manner of fruits of the sea but go from September to April to enjoy the plump, firm native oysters with their almost nutty taste. The native oyster is eaten during the months with an &lsquo;r&rsquo; in as these are the cooler months when they thrive. The other months give the oysters time to breed and rest. Natives are the indigenous oyster type and the rock is an introduced variety which can be eaten all year round.<br /> <br /> So, now, how do you enjoy an oyster? There aren&rsquo;t many people who have them for breakfast, but whether you eat them with bread and butter or with a glass of champagne, all you need is a squeeze of lemon juice or maybe a dash of shallot vinegar. Be sure to chew your oyster especially if you choose a size one, the largest oyster size available and a full meal in itself!</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> 0 Little Known London - St Stephen Walbrook http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/st-stephen-walbrook/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/st-stephen-walbrook/#comments Tues, 05 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/st-stephen-walbrook/ For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise... For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_371.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Of all the Wren churches in London, this is my favourite. If churches were a selection of cakes, this would be the Fondant Fancy, a small, light, pastel gem that is easy to miss as you wander around the City. You really need to ensure that you step back from this church to admire it. It is easy to miss its best asset if you stand too close. It has the most darling of domes &ndash; a small, perfectly formed verdigris cupola. The walls are high and fortress-like with high oval windows that provide both privacy and security.<br /> <br /> The church nestles behind Mansion House and would have been next to one of the lost rivers of London, the Walbrook. This subterranean stream starts in Shoreditch and enters the Thames near Cannon Street. The tiny churchyard feels dominated by the nearby modern offices but at least you can enjoy the reflections of the church in the glass edifice of the Rothschild&rsquo;s HQ. In the madness of London, this is surprisingly calm.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Once inside the church, the magic really begins. The first thing you notice is the light. Its interior is frosted perfection and as you walk in your eyes are automatically drawn to the sugar work dome supported by twelve Corinthian columns. Sir Christopher Wren created this church in a rectangle for a London congregation and to perfect the dome that would become the signature of St Paul&rsquo;s cathedral. It took 7 years to complete and was finished in 1679. The Second World War did little to damage this church.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="Garaways" src="/images/categories/698A9981.jpg" style="width: 402px; height: 489px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">In 1953, the rector of St Stephen Walbrook founded The Samaritan&rsquo;s as the world&#39;s first crisis hotline telephone support to those contemplating suicide. The old fashioned black telephone that was once used by the founder, Dr Chad Varah, is still there encased in Perspex as a reminder of such a good cause.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="Cornhill" src="/images/categories/698A9985.jpg" style="width: 427px; height: 640px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">However, the church, although small and very pretty, also courted controversy. In 1987, the same rector commissioned a Henry Moore altar. This is a rounded block of marble that sits in the very middle of the church with the dome above and the chairs placed in the round. It is theatrical but it has to be said you either love it or hate it.<br /> <br /> Sit for a while and enjoy the peace of the church. If you sit around the benches around the edge of the church, you will be sitting where the poorer members of the congregation sat rubbing their backs against the wooden panels and creating its unique patina. As you leave the church and walk away, look back and up to catch the final glimpse of the pale green dome, a rare sight in London that would have been dominated by towers and spires.</span><br /> 0 Little Known London http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london/#comments Mon, 04 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london/ The Penhaligon’s Times is running a new series on Little Known London. These blog pieces cover the secret bits of London; those hard to find little gems that makes London, London. The Penhaligon’s Times is running a new series on Little Known London. These blog pieces cover the secret bits of London; those hard to find little gems that makes London, London.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_373.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">When we think of London, we think of the impressive London that is on show when we switch on the television to see a Royal wedding or the state opening of parliament. The London of pomp and ceremony and who can forget London as the backdrop to the Olympics &ndash; what a backdrop!<br /> <br /> We may have seen London from the top of a tour bus or whisking through in a cab. Some have flown over and seen the Thames snaking through the landscape creating a watery divide that we barely even notice on the ground. London is regal, grand, dramatic and noble, and we love the theatre and the colour and the sheer history of the place. This is an ancient city that is ageing with great style and grace. It is also a city with secrets. It has some pretty weird, quirky and just plain curious things to see but you have to look, you have to seek them out. &nbsp;<br /> <br /> For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise. We have all heard people saying that we need to look up in London; this is so true but to really get to know this city, you also need to question things. Why is this green space here, where does this alleyway lead and what are do those marks or details mean? Dig a little bit deeper and you can find out how London really ticks and the secrets that add dimension and beauty to this great city.<br /> <br /> The little known places that have been chosen are some of the most interesting places or details in London. They range from churches with secrets, a true London village, parks that are not quite what they seem, beautiful unknown houses, world firsts and some tiny, hard to spot details.<br /> <br /> Keep your eyes peeled for these treasures on the blog and on the streets.<br /> <br /> Coming soon...</span><br /> <br /> 0 Greenwich Observatory with Monalogue Blog http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/#comments Mon, 06 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Ramona http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/ Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on... Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_372.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on...<br /> <br /> <em>You may remember that a few months ago I paid a visit to Penhaligon&rsquo;s London for a <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/"><u><strong>fragrance profiling session</strong></u></a>. Since then, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have released a new fragrance, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>. Luna is floral and feminine, and inspired by the light of the crescent moon. To celebrate the launch of their new fragrance, Penhaligon&rsquo;s sent myself and the wonderful Kym Grimshaw away to Greenwich Observatory, London.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Greenwich Observatory<br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich.jpg" /></strong><br /> <br /> Because there were so many things we wanted to see whilst in London, the day involved 14 glorious miles of walking. We hardly scraped the surface of what Greenwich has to offer, let alone central London itself. Greenwich Observatory is situated on the highest point in Greenwich Park. It&rsquo;s known for its roles in astronomy, navigation, and (of course) Greenwich Mean Time. The modern Prime Meridian is based at the observatory, so you can stand between the East and West hemispheres of the world.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_large_inside.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich1.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Beyond these points, the observatory is an enchanting 17th century build. Back in the day, it cost &pound;520 to build, which was &pound;20 over budget! Inside you can find telescopes, navigational equipment and timepieces of all shapes, ages and sizes.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Old Royal Naval College<br /> <br /> <img alt="Observatory at Greenwich, London" src="/images/blogs/372_large_greenwich.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Royal Observatory" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich2.jpg" /></strong><br /> <br /> It would have been a wasted opportunity to not explore the other attractions in Greenwich. The Old Royal Naval College is the architectural centerpiece of Maritime Greenwich. The buildings are Grade I listed. They are so spectacular that it was virtually impossible to do them justice with a photograph. Nevertheless, I took many!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Within the Royal Naval College is the Painted Hall, also known as &lsquo;the Sistine Chapel of the UK&rsquo;. It&rsquo;s easy to understand why when you see it. My standard travel blog posts are characterised by paragraphs of waffle. In this case there are no words adequate enough for description, or at least I can&rsquo;t come up with any. Have a look:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img alt="Painted Hall Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_large_observatory.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich3.jpg" /><br /> <br /> We must have spent about hald an hour trying to take photos of the roof using the mirros in the painted hall.<br /> <br /> <strong>Blackheath</strong><br /> <br /> Our visit to Blackheath is probably where we racked up the most miles on our pedometers. We crossed from Greenwich territory into the Borough of Lewisham in search of pretty doortraits. We got so carried away that we had to get a bus back to Greenwich in search of food. If I could live anywhere in London, Blackheath would be a strong contender.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> On route we stopped at the Ranger&rsquo;s House in Greenwich Park, which was full of squirrels and pretty roses.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Blackheath" src="/images/blogs/372_large_blackheath.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Blackheath, London" src="/images/blogs/372_london2.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Central London</strong><br /> <br /> There were still a few things on my London checklist, so after grabbing a nutritious vegan lasagne in Greenwich market, we hopped on the tube towards the centre. We called in to Daunt Books in Marylebone High Street, and had a nosy at the nearby and Instagram-famous Warren Mews.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Central London" src="/images/blogs/372_london.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> We also managed to squeeze in a quick tour of Chelsea. Although I&rsquo;ve been to Chelsea a number of times, I&rsquo;ve never seen it during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Many of the shops were extensively (and I&rsquo;m not exaggerating) adorned with blooms and bouquets.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Central London, Chelsea" src="/images/blogs/372_blackheath.jpg" /><br /> And that concludes a day full of pretty London things, courtesy of Penhaligon&rsquo;s London. Once again I&rsquo;d like to thank them for a beautiful day and a beautiful fragrance.</em></span><br /> <br /> <br /> To read more from the lovely Ramona you can find her blog <u><strong><a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/2016/03/14/penhaligons-london-fragrance-profiling-afternoon/">here</a></strong></u>.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <to blog="" can="" find="" from="" her="" lovely="" more="" ramona="" read="" the="" u="" you=""><em>&nbsp;</em></to><br /> 0 Hidden London: Royal Academy http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/#comments Thurs, 19 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/ Next in our Hidden London series is the Royal Academy, not exacly hidden but a gem you may have walked past as opposed to exploring inside. Next in our Hidden London series is the Royal Academy, not exacly hidden but a gem you may have walked past as opposed to exploring inside.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_347.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> The Royal Academy sits right in the heart of William Penhaligon&#39;s London on Picadilly, there is no doubt he would have walked by it many times as the first Penhaligon&#39;s shop was just round the corner in St James. A beautiful building and great place to sit and have a coffee but even more of a joy to explore the exhibitions that go on there. Famous for it&#39;s Summer Exhibition and the many notable artists that have graced it&#39;s walls for centuries as well as the general public who can submit their work for consideration and possible inclusion in the exhibition, it&#39;s a diverse and colourful spectacular with art displayed from the floor to the ceiling.<br /> <br /> The Royal Academy is different from most art galleries as it is led by artists (know as Royal Academians) and focuses not only on the exhibition of art but also of it&#39;s practise. It was the first Art School in Britain and still offers a post-graduate course, that is free to study but one of the most competitive in the country to secure a place on.<br /> <br /> The 248th Summer Exhibition opens to the public in early June. The world&rsquo;s largest open submission exhibition, provides a unique platform for emerging and established artists and architects to showcase their recent work to an international audience. It&#39;s well worth a visit.<br /> <br /> Our Burlington Arcade boutique is right next door to the Academy so come and say hello!</span><br /> <br /> <br /> 0 Penhaligon's x Saks Fifth Avenue: The Secret Garden http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/#comments Fri, 13 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/ To celebrate the Saks Glam Gardens 2016 event, Penhaligon's Equinox Bloom is featured in a stunning window display as part of the Secret Garden Spring campaign on Fifth Avenue, NYC. To celebrate the Saks Glam Gardens 2016 event, Penhaligon's Equinox Bloom is featured in a stunning window display as part of the Secret Garden Spring campaign on Fifth Avenue, NYC.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_366.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">This Spring we have been featured in the new campaign Glam Gardens 2016: The Secret Garden at Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City. <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Equinox Bloom</strong></u></a> takes centre stage in one of the stunning windows inspired by High Tea and Spring Blooms.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Saks Fifth Avenue is embracing the spirit of Spring with The Secret Garden&mdash;a true homage to Mother Nature filled with splendor and the revitalizing theater of the garden.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Equinox Bloom</strong></u></a> was the perfect choice for the window as it too was inspired by the sweet treats of tea and fragrant floral notes of Jasmine and Orange Blossom.<br /> <br /> If you are visiting NYC and see the windows, don&#39;t forget to tweet us a pic or tag us on instagram!<br /> <br /> <em>Saks Fifth Avenue, 12 East 49th Street New York until May 24th 2016.</em></span><br /> <br /> 0 An Eternal Slumber http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-eternal-slumber/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-eternal-slumber/#comments Tues, 03 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-eternal-slumber/ The myth of Endymion has been told in many different ways… The myth of Endymion has been told in many different ways…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_363.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Dating back as far as the 6th Century BC, the tale of Endymion is an Ancient Greek myth that acted as inspiration for our modern classic fragrance &ndash; recently reimagined in a more powerful Eau de Parfum as <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/endymion-concentre-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Endymion Concentr&eacute;</strong></u></a> &ndash; and finally meeting his love,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/" style="font-size: 14px;"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">A handsome young shepherd, without comparison throughout all of Ancient Greece, Endymion would tend his flock in the hills of Elis, and was said to be the first mortal to observe the movement of the moon.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>, the moon goddess, drove her chariot across the heavens every night drawn by snow-white, long-maned horses, taking with her the light of the moon.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Every night, she would gaze upon the beauty of the shepherd Endymion. Filled with longing, Luna pleaded with Zeus for the right to his son. Endymion fell in love with Luna as she crossed the skies.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Zeus eventually conceded to Luna, permitting her to place Endymion into an eternal slumber. In his state of permanent sleep, he would remain ageless and deathless - and his beauty would be preserved.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">From then on, Luna visited Endymion every night in his slumber&hellip;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">NB:&nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">The story of Endymion, like most stories in ancient mythology, is often contested by scholars, having been retold by various poets throughout history and translated into several versions.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Endymion, was said to be the son of Zeus, king of the gods, and Calyce, a mortal woman. By most accounts, Endymion was a shepherd, but in others he was King of Elis &ndash; or son of the king, rather than Zeus.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Luna was a Titan goddess, the personification of the moon. In various versions of the myth, she also goes by Selene. Titan was also the Roman counterpart to Selene throughout several. Diana was the counterpart to Artemis, and in later Roman beliefs was also cognate to Selene as the moon goddess.</span></div> 0 Hymn to the Moon http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hymn-to-the-moon/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hymn-to-the-moon/#comments Mon, 02 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hymn-to-the-moon/ A beautiful homeric hymn dedicated to the Moon A beautiful homeric hymn dedicated to the Moon<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_364.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Whilst attributed to Homer because of the epic style verse that reflects the Odyssey and Iliad, the writer is unknown. The below hymn is part of a series of thirty-three written to celebrate and worship individual gods. Inspired by the light of a magnificent crescent moon that brightens one&rsquo;s dreams, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a> is captured beautifully in this ancient prose.</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Daughters of Jove, whose voice is melody,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Muses, who know and rule all minstrelsy,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Sing the wide-winged Moon! Around the earth,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">From her immortal head in Heaven shot forth,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Far light is scattered--boundless glory springs;</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Where&#39;er she spreads her many-beaming wings</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">The lampless air glows round her golden crown.</span></em></div> <div> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">But when the Moon divine from Heaven is gone</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Under the sea, her beams within abide,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Till, bathing her bright limbs in Ocean&#39;s tide,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Clothing her form in garments glittering far,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">And having yoked to her immortal car</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">The beam-invested steeds whose necks on high</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Curve back, she drives to a remoter sky</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">A western Crescent, borne impetuously.</span></em></div> <div> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Then is made full the circle of her light,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">And as she grows, her beams more bright and bright</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Are poured from Heaven, where she is hovering then,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">A wonder and a sign to mortal men.</span></em></div> <div> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">The Son of Saturn with this glorious Power</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Mingled in love and sleep--to whom she bore</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Pandeia, a bright maid of beauty rare</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Among the Gods, whose lives eternal are.</span></em></div> <div> <br /> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Hail Queen, great Moon, white-armed Divinity,</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Fair-haired and favourable! thus with thee</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">My song beginning, by its music sweet</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Shall make immortal many a glorious feat</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Of demigods, with lovely lips, so well</span></em></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size:14px;">Which minstrels, servants of the Muses, tell.</span></em></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> 0 A Moonlit Romance http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-moonlit-romance/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-moonlit-romance/#comments Sun, 01 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-moonlit-romance/ A mythical Love Story... inspired by the magic of the night; the Goddess of the Moon puts the most handsome son of Zeus, Endymion in an eternal slumber so that she may gaze upon him forever. A mythical Love Story... inspired by the magic of the night; the Goddess of the Moon puts the most handsome son of Zeus, Endymion in an eternal slumber so that she may gaze upon him forever.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_361.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/endymion/">Endymion</a></strong></u> is a firmly established part of the Penhaligon&#39;s collection, and now we have launched a concentrated new version, an intense eau de parfum.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/endymion-concentre-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Endymion Concentr&eacute;</strong></u></a> is a&nbsp;luxurious interpretation of a classic, still a fragrance of contrasts, bright and sensual, light and dark, grounded by leathery suede; distinctly masculine and deeply romantic.</span><br /> <br /> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;"><em>&#39;In ancient Greek mythology, Endymion, the most handsome son of Zeus, was placed&nbsp;</em></span><em style="font-size: 16px;">into a perpetual slumber by the Goddess of the Moon so that she could gaze upon&nbsp;</em><em style="font-size: 16px;">him forever, his stunning face unmarked by the passage of time.&nbsp;The wishes of the Goddess&nbsp;</em><em style="font-size: 16px;">were granted, and Endymion slept on for all eternity, his smile everlasting. And no wonder,&nbsp;</em><em style="font-size: 16px;">for he spent his life forever dreaming that he held the moon, Luna, gently in his arms.&#39;</em></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">So to partner Endymion we created <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>, a new fresh floral offers a feminine counterpart to the woody leather notes of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/endymion-concentre-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Endymion Concentr&eacute;</strong></u></a>.&nbsp; Inspired by the light of a magnificent crescent moon that brightens one&rsquo;s dreams, this luxurious new fragrance captures the intoxicating spirit of the mythical Goddess of the Moon. Hypnotic and sensual, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a> shines up from the dark water, illuminating the ink-coloured night sky.&nbsp; Opening with the bitter freshness of orange bigarade, the heart unfolds with the crisp lightness of juniper berry, rounded off with the sensuality of a dark woody base.</span><br /> 0 The Night Sky http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-night-sky/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-night-sky/#comments Fri, 29 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-night-sky/ Discover the hidden treasures of London by the glow of the moon, in this post we explore Greenwich.. Discover the hidden treasures of London by the glow of the moon, in this post we explore Greenwich..<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_362.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Greenwich and the Royal Observatory</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">Greenwich in the daylight is a wonderful village on the edge of London and a stone&rsquo;s throw by tube, train or boat. By night, the history and the association with the sky, the stellar system and the oceans really comes alive. Imagine the observatory on a cloudless night filled with astronomers trying to gain further understanding of the stars and other celestial bodies. There was a bona fide reason for this research. It was to aid sailors&rsquo; navigation using the stars&rsquo; alignment and ensuring they could work out their exact location just by having knowledge of the night sky.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">This was an example of great advancement in mathematics, astronomy and science and yet how did this also influence our more romantic tendencies and desire for beautiful tales of love and heroism. &nbsp;Maybe the more we use mathematics and logic to understand the world and the planetary system, the more we seem to bond with these bodies on all levels &ndash; metaphysical, mythical and emotional.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">Science and the arts are not normally great bedfellows but it cannot be denied that without the advances of science we wouldn&rsquo;t have some of our great works of fiction. These include Mary Shelley&rsquo;s Frankenstein or a later example would be Arthur Conan Doyle&rsquo;s use of science to create Sherlock Holmes. The more advances we make in science the more it seems we look to a Romantic explanation or maybe knowing the science is in place helps us understand things more or just be more accepting. Maybe this is true of the myths and legends of Ancient Greece?</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">Why were young aristocrats of the 18th and 19th century taught the Classics and why were they encouraged to read the great works of Greco-Roman philosophers and writers? Maybe the forefathers of these sons were hoping that the young Englishmen would display some of the brave and aristocratic tendencies of these ancient civilizations. And what not to like - the tales and stories of these epochs were rousing, romantic and reassuring &ndash; surely the three R&rsquo;s of former times!&nbsp;</span></div> 0 Timeless Professionals: Stone Carver http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-stone-carver/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-stone-carver/#comments Tues, 26 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-stone-carver/ The last in our Timeless Professionals series we find out about Stone Carver Sam Elgar on turning a creative passion into a profession. The last in our Timeless Professionals series we find out about Stone Carver Sam Elgar on turning a creative passion into a profession.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_344.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><em>As part of the Royal Warrant association, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have had the opportunity of interacting with members of the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST). QEST is a charity that supports the education and excellence of craft in the UK. We spoke to three QEST scholars about their crafts and how they turned their unique passion into a career.</em><br /> <br /> The last in our Timeless Professionals series we find out about Stone Carver Sam Elgar on turning a creative passion into a profession.<br /> <br /> <strong>Sam Elgar, Stone carver</strong><br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us a little about your profession?</strong><br /> I am a stone mason that is currently a second year student at the City and Guilds of London Art School, studying for a Diploma in Architectural Stone Carving. The curriculum focuses on the wide range of skills required to become a professional stone carver. These include not only carving techniques, but also drawing, modeling, casting, portraiture, artistic anatomy, ornament study, gilding, geology, professional practice, heraldry, design and the history of carving in architecture and sculpture.<br /> <br /> <strong>Where did your interest and passion in your profession come from?</strong><br /> At the age of sixteen I began a fine art course at the college in my home town of Chichester. After only 2 weeks of being on the course I had discovered stonemasonry. I immediately withdraw from the college and looked for a way into this industry. The following academic year I began my apprenticeship in stonemasonry with Cathedral Works Organisation.<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe what your typical day might look like?</strong><br /> Despite the vast amount of tasks that are present- ed to us at the Art School, the majority of our time there is dedicated to full days of carving. Before I can begin a carving, an entire process of drawing and modeling has to take place for a much deeper understanding of what it is I&rsquo;m trying to accomplished, and then ultimately a better end product. When carving it is important to begin the day by assessing what you worked on the previous day, and to look through fresh eyes at areas where I found myself struggling.<br /> <br /> <strong>What sort of challenges might you face in your job day to day?</strong><br /> Removing the wrong bit of stone! As a stonemason, this could well mean starting again with a new block. But as a stone carver (providing your commission is not to restore a piece to exactly what it used to look like), knocking off a piece of stone unintentionally can alter the carving in interesting ways and make each piece of work unique.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us about your most proud achievement to date?</strong><br /> I would say that I am fairly proud of the variety of different architectural styles that I have been able to cover being at the school. This has helped me to understand a great deal of how craftsmen in the past have carved which is invaluable knowledge.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us your ultimate dream/ambition? What would a dream commission look like?</strong> I have a growing interest in Cathedrals, and it would be my hope to combine what I have already accomplished as a stone mason, with my increasing abilities as a stone carver, and approach this countries&rsquo; Cathedrals for work restoring these magnificent buildings. A strong ambition still is to bring together my interest of working with stone along with my fascination for metal. I share a small workshop with my Dad who is a black- smith in his spare time, and together I believe we shall be able to combine these materials for some interesting sculptures.</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 A Morning with Penhaligon's http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-morning-with-penhaligons/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-morning-with-penhaligons/#comments Thurs, 21 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest:Jess-on-Thames http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-morning-with-penhaligons/ Jess from Travel Blog Jess-on-Thames recently reviewed our Fragrance Profiling at the Burlington Arcade. Jess from Travel Blog Jess-on-Thames recently reviewed our Fragrance Profiling at the Burlington Arcade.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_360.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Jess from Travel Blog Jess-on-Thames recently reviewed our Fragrance Profiling at the Burlington Arcade - here&#39;s the story of her morning with us...<br /> <br /> <em>&lt;&lt;</em> <em>This is a post about perfume that begins with a story about the ballet: I trained classically until I was in university and to this day, few things get my heart going as much as seeing the maestro&rsquo;s wand go up, the curtain rise and the first point shoe peak out on stage. (We won&rsquo;t delve into the details of that time I cried during a performance of The Nutcracker at the Royal Opera House because it was so perfect.)</em></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">The above was but some brief context to say: I&rsquo;ve loved a bottle of Penhaligon&rsquo;s<br /> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Iris Prima</strong></u></a> perfume I was given as a gift when I first arrived in London (made in partnership with the English National Ballet, the iris plays the role of &ldquo;Prima Ballerina&rdquo;). It still sits on my shelf, safe in its distinct little glass bottle and leather sole label.</span></em></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">So I was curious when Penhaligon&rsquo;s invited me to try a <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-at-penhaligons/" target="_blank"><u><strong>fragrance profiling</strong></u></a> session. Half of me stubbornly thought &ldquo;I already have my favorite&hellip;&rdquo; and the other half reluctantly admitted &ldquo;I am never good at answering questions about what I like&hellip; this is how I have ended up with countless poor haircuts and drawers full of iffy makeup colors&hellip;.&rdquo; I can also be notoriously indecisive. And yet there was something about the ballet-inspired perfume I already owned and quintessentially British feel to the brand that I was really curious about.</span></em></div> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/"> </a> <div> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/">&nbsp;</a></div> <div> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">My session was held at their store in the Burlington Arcade and the historian in me loved the facts the team told me about the property. Our session was held in a tiny red velveted room on the second floor of the shop &ndash; just myself, the lovely store manager, an antique couch and display cases I may have tried to take with me had it not been for a particularly steep staircase and bottle-upon-bottle of perfume.</span></em><br /> <br /> <img alt="Fragrance Profiling at Penhaligon's" src="/images/blogs/360-infographic.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 1018px;" /></div> <div> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/"><img alt="Penhaligon's Ellenisia" src="/images/blogs/360-Penhaligons-1-2.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 412px;" /></a></div> <div> <br /> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">I immediately fell in love with the delicate <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/ellenisia-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Ellenisia</strong></u></a>&hellip; closely followed by <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/juniper-sling-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Juniper Sling</strong></u></a> (an eau de toilette dedicated to the 1920s which smells &ndash; if you can imagine it &ndash; like a gin &amp; tonic bottled into a perfume) and <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/artemisia-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Artemisia</strong></u></a> (evoking the goddess of hunting and soft cashmere).</span></em></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">Bloggers are storytellers, so I love that it is Penhaligon&rsquo;s creative department which tasks the perfumers with a story, a place or an item they then have to craft a scent from, using over 3000+ raw materials at their disposal. The perfumes are still made in England and still presented in the same bottles &ndash; just as they were back when William Penhaligon first created his original scent (it was in fact his son&rsquo;s 1902 scent <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blenheim-bouquet-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Blenheim Bouquet</strong></u></a> which made the brand famous&hellip; it was made for the Duke of Marlborough of Blenheim Palace fame.)</span></em></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <em><span style="font-size: 14px;">Armed now with my new love for a perfume loaded with history, I also learned a few interesting perfume facts:</span><br /> <img alt="The Perfume Pyramid" src="/images/blogs/360-Penhaligons-Pyramid.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 421px;" /></em></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>I have to thank the Penhaligon&rsquo;s team for a truly wonderful hour spent during the profiling session and gladly recommend it to anyone interested in a new perfume. I know I will be returning soon because I&rsquo;ve just read they have a scent called &ldquo;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/bluebell-eau-de-toilette-fragrance/"><u><strong>Bluebell</strong></u></a>&rdquo; which sounds delightful. For more information on fragrance profiling and to book a complimentary session, </em><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/"><u><em><strong><em>contact a Penhaligon&rsquo;s </em>store</strong></em></u></a><em>. </em>&gt;&gt;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> Read more from Jess on her blog: <a href="http://www.jessonthames.com/"><u><strong>jessonthames.com</strong></u></a>. 0 We are nominated for a Shortlist Magazine Grooming Award! http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/we-are-nominated-for-a-shortlist-magazine-grooming-award/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/we-are-nominated-for-a-shortlist-magazine-grooming-award/#comments Mon, 18 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/we-are-nominated-for-a-shortlist-magazine-grooming-award/ We are delighted to announce we’ve been nominated in not one but two categories in this year’s ShortList Magazine Grooming Awards. We are delighted to announce we’ve been nominated in not one but two categories in this year’s ShortList Magazine Grooming Awards.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_359.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:16px;">We are delighted to announce we&rsquo;ve been nominated in not one but two categories in this year&rsquo;s ShortList Magazine Grooming Awards.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> And the nominees are&hellip;<br /> <br /> <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/no33-beard-face-scrub/">No.33 Face &amp; Beard Scrub</a></strong></u> for Best Facial Cleanser/Exfoliator and <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blasted-heath-eau-de-parfum/">Blasted Heath</a></strong></u> for Best New Men&rsquo;s Fragrance.<br /> <br /> All we need now are votes! So if you&#39;re blown away by Blasted Heath or have enjoyed an invigorating scrub with our Face and Beard scrub you can vote for us <em><u><strong><a href="http://www.shortlist.com/style/grooming/grooming-awards-2016">here</a></strong></u></em>!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br /> <br /> Both products launched last year in our Summer of Gentlemen.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blasted-heath-eau-de-parfum/">Blasted Heath</a></strong></u> is our latest fragrance for men, the outdoor ruggedness of the British coastline is refined by perfumer Alberto Morillas into a bold, multi-layered expression of nature&#39;s most precious wonders.</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="Blasted Heath" src="/images/products/medium/BLASTEDHEATHEDP.jpg" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/no33-beard-face-scrub/">No.33 Face &amp; Beard Scrub</a></strong></u> is part of our male grooming range designed to suit the skincare needs of the conscientious modern gentleman. An invigorating scrub for smoother skin on the face and beneath the beard.</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="No.33 Beard Scrub" src="/images/products/medium/NO33BEARDSCRUB.jpg" style="width: 360px; height: 450px;" /></span></div> <span style="font-size:16px;">&nbsp;<br /> Don&rsquo;t forget to <u><em><strong><a href="http://www.shortlist.com/style/grooming/grooming-awards-2016">vote</a></strong></em></u>!</span><br /> <br /> 0 Bluebells http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/bluebells/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/bluebells/#comments Mon, 11 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Laura http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/bluebells/ The common bluebell is a true sign of British springtime. There is something quite ethereal about a sea of bluebells covering woodlands in a haze of purpley blue. This spectacular botannical display is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the world’s population. The common bluebell is a true sign of British springtime. There is something quite ethereal about a sea of bluebells covering woodlands in a haze of purpley blue. This spectacular botannical display is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the world’s population.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_135.jpg"<br/><br/><p> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">The common bluebell is a true sign of British springtime. There is something quite ethereal about a sea of bluebells covering woodlands in a haze of purpley blue. This spectacular botannical display is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the world&rsquo;s population.<br /> <br /> In 1850, Emily Bronte described how:</span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;"><em>&lsquo;&lsquo;The Bluebell is the sweetest flower<br /> That waves in summer air:<br /> Its blossoms have the mightiest power<br /> To soothe my spirit&rsquo;s care.&rsquo;</em></span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;">In the Victorian art of floriography, the bluebell represented humility and constancy. The presence of &nbsp;a bluebell in a floral bouquet would have symbolised one&rsquo;s unwavering devotion to their love, through the means of this coded message.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="Floriography of Bluebells" src="/images/blogs/135-bluebellcard.jpg" style="width: 474px; height: 658px;" /></span></p> <p> <span style="font-size:16px;"><a href="/bluebell-eau-de-toilette-fragrance/" target="">Our cult scent, Bluebell </a>was originally created in 1978 and is the pure unadulterated distillation of the scent of bluebell woods. Complex and utterly distinctive, Bluebell is a soliflore scent, evocative of wet earth, moss and rain; it softly detonates across your scent receptors.&nbsp; Close your eyes&hellip;.imagine you are standing in a bluebell wood, dappled in bright spring sunshine, a light breeze dancing through the leaves. Inhale&hellip;..it has just rained&hellip; a spring shower. All around you, soft sounds, a sudden overwhelming scent, green and mossy: a carpet of bluebells, rain in the air, loamy wet bark, damp grass and floral notes.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="Bluebell by Penhaligons" src="/images/blogs/bluebellfrag.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 332px;" /></span></p> <p> &nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</p> <p> &nbsp;</p> 0 Timeless Professionals: Sculptor http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-sculptor/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-sculptor/#comments Tues, 05 Apr 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-sculptor/ Continuing our Timeless Professionals series we spoke to Jessica Wetherly, a Sculptor who is part of the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust about her work. Continuing our Timeless Professionals series we spoke to Jessica Wetherly, a Sculptor who is part of the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust about her work.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_343.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><em>As part of the Royal Warrant association, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have had the opportunity of interacting with members of the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST). QEST is a charity that supports the education and excellence of craft in the UK. We spoke to three QEST scholars about their crafts and how they turned their unique passion into a career.</em><br /> <br /> <strong>Jessica Wetherly, Sculptor</strong><br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us a little about your profession?</strong><br /> The profession is really varied and requires a wide understanding of various materials and techniques; from welding, modelling in wax, plaster and clay to moulding and casting. It&#39;s physically challenging and very messy. I spend more time in builders merchants than art shops and you&#39;re not unlikely to spot me knee deep in resin or head to toe in plaster. In a world where we expect instant gratification, sculpture is a really slow burner. The task is to keep the energy in the piece as if you made it in one day, even if it took ten. You also always have to be prepared to loose everything at any point. I try to get my students used to this by doing an exercise where they have to destroy their own work. There is something enjoyable and definitely freeing about separating yourself from the attachment of what you have made.<br /> <br /> <strong>Where did your interest and passion in your profession come from?</strong><br /> I really love exploring the world visually; translating it into an object which exists in the three dimensional world, it&#39;s like solving a mathematical puzzle. You have to work out the underlining structure, the architecture of forms and how they connect; it becomes really exciting trying to simplify complex shapes! Sculpture is one of the oldest art forms and it is nice to be a part of that heritage. You can look at a studio from the 1800s and today and it&#39;s not that much different!<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe what your typical day might look like?</strong><br /> I try to give myself very simple goals, so that I can feel I have accomplished something each day. I prefer to wake up slowly giving myself two hours to get up and prepare myself so I feel relaxed. This includes, exercise, admin and a good breakfast! I try to break the day up so I don&#39;t end up in a monotonous haze. I often have a model in the morning, usually a 2-3 hour intense session where I will most likely be working on my figurative portfolio or a similar commission. After lunch, I gather together the things I need to work on on-going projects. Such projects require a different kind of attention and often have a longer duration- as they involve more conceptual considerations, material trials and critique.<br /> <br /> <strong>What sort of challenges might you face in your job day to day?</strong><br /> Sculpture is so varied so it is really important to be prepared before you start and try things out before you throw all your eggs in one bas- ket. Transitioning between different types of work, aforementioned, can sometimes be hard, especially if you have just had a messy casting session. I really like a clean(ish) workspace but with sculpture that&#39;s really hard as the dust gets everywhere! In an ideal world all sculptors would have workshop, studio and an office.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us about your most proud achievement to date?</strong><br /> When I realised I had survived my first year entirely solely self-employed! As a young artist it is a huge achievement especially as you need the trust of everyone you work with, that you will provide what you promise, without a proven track record - a big responsibility when you are starting out on your own. I just received a commission for a permanent sculpture in Archbishops Park in Lambeth, it&#39;s a really exciting venture and I feel privileged to have the opportunity to have a piece displayed in such a prominent position in Central London.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us your ultimate dream/ambition? What would a dream commission look like?</strong> My ambition is to have, space, time, no limits or expectations. But I think that is everyone&#39;s ideal! My ideal commission, right now, would be to travel and discover the faces of different cultures and combine them with influencing aesthetics from the respective traditional dress, ancient sculptures and contemporary art.</span> 0 Timeless Professionals: Book binder http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-book-binder/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-book-binder/#comments Tues, 29 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/timeless-professionals-book-binder/ As part of the Royal Warrant Association we have had the opportunity to meet with three scholars and find out about their craft, Emily Juniper is a book binder. As part of the Royal Warrant Association we have had the opportunity to meet with three scholars and find out about their craft, Emily Juniper is a book binder.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_342.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><em>As part of the Royal Warrant association, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have had the opportunity of interacting with members of the Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust (QEST). QEST is a charity that supports the education and excellence of craft in the UK. We spoke to three QEST scholars about their crafts and how they turned their unique passion into a career.</em><br /> <br /> <strong>Emily Juniper, Book binding</strong><br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us a little about your profession?</strong><br /> I am a bookbinder, writer &amp; illustrator. I think I am drawn to the art of making books as it is a physical manifestation of our human need to communicate, and to disseminate stories and information. All crafts exist as a sort of deification of materials and I love everything I work with, the leather, the cloth, the tools and there&rsquo;s something so enduring about paper itself. I began binding because I love playing with the relationship that the book binding has with the contents; so as a writer and illustrator I consider the book making part of the process of great story telling.<br /> <br /> <strong>Where did your interest and passion in your profession come from?</strong><br /> I grew up in a house full of books, they lined the walls in every room, and I think I will always find them comforting as objects. My background is actually in performance, so when I work I tend to be thinking about a book&rsquo;s theatrical possibili- ties. I want my bindings to work as a kind of &lsquo;stag- ing&rsquo; for the story: The paper I choose to &lsquo;cast&rsquo;, the way I &lsquo;direct&rsquo; the thread, the weight of the book; the story is scored to the percussive turn of each page. Ultimately my hope is to create a beautiful experience for the reader, after all your audience hold your work in their hand, so you must do them the honor of holding their attention.<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe what your typical day might look like?</strong><br /> There&rsquo;s no routine as such &ndash; every book I make is unique, and that means the process is unpredict- able &ndash; I bind theatrical scripts, fiction, children&rsquo;s stories, essays, poetry collections and note books. I work at home &ndash; and my studio space will be tweaked to suit each project. I spend part of my day researching either at home or in the library; I feel like I spend a lot of my time climbing in- side huge rolls of paper or cloth to cut pages and covers.<br /> <br /> <strong>What sort of challenges might you face in your job day to day?</strong><br /> My biggest problem is the leap from research to application - it&rsquo;s very easy to get totally engrossed in a book, a story, a visual trail. Taking myself out of the thinking space and onto the drawing board can be hard. I am a perfectionist as well, so I will have a clear idea of what something will look like and work tirelessly to achieve that &ndash; so knowing when to stop is another difficult part of my working day.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us about your most proud achievement to date?</strong><br /> I&rsquo;ve managed to convince five artists whose work I adore to contribute to a journal I am launching next year called Canary.<br /> We will write and illustrate mini essays which link our research practice to our crafts. I will then design and bind the works to complement the contents. I am getting to work with some of the most brilliant artists and creative minds that I know and so I feel really proud that they all want to be involved in the project. It&rsquo;s one of those moments where instead of wishing you were a part of something, you make it happen for yourself &ndash; which is quite invigorating!<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us your ultimate dream/ambition?</strong><br /> When someone commissions me to make a book I put my all into it, and so the best moment is when I get feedback. I once bound a book that was someone&rsquo;s proposal; he gave the book to his girlfriend underneath the clock in Grand Central Station &ndash; it was a story about their courtship and as she turned to the last page it asked if she&rsquo;d spend the rest of her life with him &ndash; I think I was more nervous than him on the day! Those are my favourite commissions &ndash; when the work you do plays a part in a moment of someone&rsquo;s life. Also because I like binding theatrical scripts, a great dream job would be to work with a theatre, like the National or the Royal Court and create a be- spoke binding for one of their productions.</span><br /> 0 Fragrance Profiling Review by Monalogue Blog http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/#comments Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Ramona http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/ In celebration of National Fragrance Day, on Monday 21st March, we sent a scent novice to our Covent Garden store to receive a Fragrance profiling. In celebration of National Fragrance Day, on Monday 21st March, we sent a scent novice to our Covent Garden store to receive a Fragrance profiling.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_358.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">In celebration of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-fragrance-day/" target="_blank"><u><strong>National Fragrance Day</strong></u></a>, on Monday 21st March, we sent a scent novice to our Covent Garden store to receive a <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-at-penhaligons/" target="_blank"><u><strong>Fragrance profiling</strong></u></a>. Our consultation offers an authentic way of discovering a special fragrance and a true way of wearing it.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <i>&ldquo;I discovered my love for Penhaligon&rsquo;s about six months ago when I stumbled upon <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/iris-prima-eau-de-parfum/" target="_blank"><u><strong>Iris Prima</strong></u></a> whilst looking for Christmas presents. I didn&rsquo;t get any Christmas shopping done that afternoon but my vanity table was adorned with a pretty new bottle. After this I noticed their very Instagram-worthy shopfront whilst wondering around Kensington. Needless to say it was a complete joy to be invited for a fragrance profiling session this month.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> I must confess my fragrance repertoire is rather limited. And by rather limited I mean I&rsquo;ve only worn a few scents that I received as gifts, and the occasional splash of Christian Dior that I pinched from my mother&rsquo;s dresser as a child. It would be accurate to refer to the profiling session as a learning experience.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> So, today I headed to Penhaligon&rsquo;s in Covent Garden. The store is true to its Victorian roots, with chandeliers, wall cabinets of glistening bottles, authentic fireplaces and a chaise longue. I was offered a glass of prosecco and made to feel most at home!</i></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <i><span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Equinox Bloom" src="/images/blogs/358-Penhaligons-london-21.jpg" style="width: 526px; height: 583px;" /></span></i></div> <i><span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;<br /> Fragrance profiling is important, not just to find a scent that you love, but because a scent can change dramatically when it is worn. One perfume can have a hugely different tone across a small selection of people.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> We worked our way through a selection of fragrances, starting with the 1872 original <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hammam-bouquet-a-true-original/" target="_blank"><strong><u>Hammam Bouquet</u></strong></a>. From delicate florals to intense oriental notes, they adjusted the testers according to my preferences until I&rsquo;d chosen five contenders.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Once I&rsquo;d chosen five finalists that I liked in equal measure, it was time to try the scents on. At this moment, the way perfumes change on application became incredibly apparent. Three scents I&rsquo;d liked on the testing papers I began to dislike, and two that I had liked on paper I fell in love with.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> We ate some chocolates while I pondered over my choices. After 45 minutes of magical sensory indulgence I decided on <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a></strong></u>, a new addition to the Penhaligon&rsquo;s catalogue, inspired by the English tradition of afternoon tea. Notes of spring flowers and brown sugar make Equinox Bloom fresh and sweet. And what&rsquo;s not to like about spring flowers and brown sugar?<br /> <br /> <img alt="Fragrance Profiling" src="/images/blogs/358-Penhaligons-london-19.jpg" style="width: 614px; height: 409px;" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Again staying true to their Victorian roots, the store manager packed the perfume beautifully in a traditional style, with a little ribbon handle. After a final glass of prosecco and a few more chocolates I left the store feeling very pleased, a little bit merry and smelling wonderful, if I may say so.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Fragrance profiling isn&rsquo;t just for special occasions. I felt like the folks of Penhaligon&rsquo;s legitimately want their customers to feel confident with their chosen scent, whether it&rsquo;s for daily use or for their wedding day. I know I feel confident with mine, and couldn&rsquo;t recommend the profiling sessions more.&rdquo;<br /> &nbsp;</span></i><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><span>To book your own complimentary Fragrance Profiling consultation call your nearest <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">Penhaligon&#39;s store.</a></strong></u><br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> To read more from the lovely Ramona you can find her blog <u><strong><a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/2016/03/14/penhaligons-london-fragrance-profiling-afternoon/">here</a></strong></u>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span><br /> 0 National Fragrance Day http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-fragrance-day/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-fragrance-day/#comments Weds, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-fragrance-day/ Monday 21st of March is National Fragrance Day here in the UK – so we’ve got some tips to make new #ScentMemories Monday 21st of March is National Fragrance Day here in the UK – so we’ve got some tips to make new #ScentMemories<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_356.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">National Fragrance Day is a celebration of our sense of smell, the most underappreciated of the senses. Ignored by scientific research in favour of sight, hearing and taste for a number of years, the sense of smell has recently come to the forefront of research in perception &ndash; as people become more aware of the impact of the scent on our everyday lives.<br /> <br /> As you are probably aware, the sense of smell is tied to the centres in the brain responsible for memories and emotions &ndash; we always feel and remember before we process what exactly we are smelling. This explains why we are often transported backwards in time to being a young child and baking cakes in our grandmother&rsquo;s kitchen when we smell vanilla essence, for example.<br /> <br /> With this power in mind, it&rsquo;s important to pay attention to scent when celebrating important milestones in your life &ndash; or symbolising new chapters with new fragrances. So we&rsquo;ve come up with a few tips to help you make the most of those chapters in your life.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <b>Transport yourself to faraway climes&hellip;</b><br /> <br /> Need to a way to mark a special once in a lifetime trip? Take a new perfume with you on your holiday, and spritz it every day. Wearing the fragrance will associate it with all of the activities you get up to, whether it&rsquo;s exploring a new city or relaxing on a beach. Once you return, wear the same perfume on those days you need a little escapism, and you&rsquo;ll immediately remember that marvellous, relaxing holiday&hellip;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <b>A reminder of the special day&hellip;</b><br /> <br /> Choosing a new wedding fragrance is as important as every other aspect of the big day &ndash; and your most powerful tool to remember all the wonderful moments from your wedding. The most important thing about a wedding fragrance is that it should be worn on all special occasions in the lead up to the day: choosing the dress or picking the suits, rehearsals and of course on the day itself. By wearing it throughout all these milestones, you&rsquo;ll come to associate the fragrance with everything positive in the build up to the day, as well as the day itself.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <b>An olfactory signature&hellip;</b><br /> <br /> Sometimes, we want to create a lasting impression in others, or our children, so that when they smell a fragrance they will be reminded of us. The most important thing is to remember that fragrance marks out periods of a life time &ndash; we don&rsquo;t wear the same clothes forever, as fashions change and so do we &ndash; but having a selection of fragrances that people associate with you is very important to some people.<br /> <br /> If you need help choosing a fragrance for yourself, do get in touch, or visit your <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">nearest Penhaligon&rsquo;s store</a></strong></u> for a Fragrance Profiling Appointment &ndash; our innovative method where our in-store fragrance experts will delve into your personality and lifestyle, as well as a little of your personal fragrance history, to find a new perfume that matches you and celebrates everything that makes you special.<br /> <br /> See you there!</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 A Symphony of Scent http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-symphony-of-scent/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-symphony-of-scent/#comments Mon, 14 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Persolaise http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-symphony-of-scent/ Fragrance blogger Persolaise talks us through the symphony of scent, and all it's many facets. Fragrance blogger Persolaise talks us through the symphony of scent, and all it's many facets.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_335.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Here&rsquo;s an expression that tends to be misused: &lsquo;greater than the sum of its parts&rsquo;. It&rsquo;s adopted to make an argument sound more impressive, but on closer examination, it frequently turns out to be hollow. However, in some cases, it&rsquo;s spot on. Take painting, for instance. Through a careful composition of separate shades, hues and layers, an artist can create an overall impact which is more powerful than the separate force of the individual elements. And then there&rsquo;s music. When floaty highs, sinewy middles and deep basses are brought together in a seamless harmony, they produce a resonance that seems to have a life of its own, independent of its components.<br /> <br /> It&rsquo;s an effect that isn&rsquo;t given the attention it deserves by perfume lovers, despite the fact that many fragrance houses create products to complement their most acclaimed scents. Penhaligon&rsquo;s is no exception. Their classic <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/lily-of-the-valley-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Lily Of The Valley</strong></u></a>, for example, comes not just in the well-known eau de toilette form, but also as a bath oil, a soap and a body cream. Needless to say, the perfume is more than adequate by itself; indeed, it is one of the finest expressions we currently have of a flower whose scent is fiendishly difficult to re-create in a fragrance lab. But when it&rsquo;s sprayed over skin that has absorbed the richness of the cream and the steamy delicacy of the oil, it takes on an even more alluring hue.<br /> <br /> Such languorous rituals can be enjoyed with masculine compositions too. <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/sartorial-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Sartorial</strong></u></a>, the 2010 hit featuring a striking blend of chalky lavender and beeswax, is available in more than five incarnations, including a shower gel, deodorant, shaving cream and, most luxurious of all, a beard oil. Put them all together, and you cut a figure more intriguing and more distinctive than you would with just the eau de toilette on its own.<br /> <br /> For those dubious about such self-indulgence, it&rsquo;s worth mentioning that combining a fragrance with its bath or grooming products has a practical use: it serves to make the scent last longer and to project more powerfully. But perfume should be less about practicality and more about sensuality. And why should we settle for just one form of pleasure when we can place layers and layers of it over each other to produce a symphony of deliciousness? Answer: we shouldn&rsquo;t. So the next time you&rsquo;re perfume shopping, give in to your decadent side and keep a nose out for a scent that&rsquo;s available in several delectable guises.</span> 0 Hidden London: Painted Hall http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-painted-hall/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-painted-hall/#comments Mon, 07 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-painted-hall/ A painted masterpiece in the Royal Naval College in Greenwich is next up on our Hidden London series... A painted masterpiece in the Royal Naval College in Greenwich is next up on our Hidden London series...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_341.jpg"<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> Hidden in the Old Royal Navy College in Greenwich London is the Painted Hall. A breathtaking space dubbed the &#39;UK Sistine Chapel.&#39; It was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and Nicholas Hawksmoor, intended as a dining hall for the naval pensioners who lived there at the Royal Hospital for Seamen. It was painted by Sir James Thornhill and depicts powerful imagery reflecting many subjects of the time, it took 19 years to complete!<br /> <br /> There are many things to see at the Royal Navel College and it&#39;s a great way to spend a day exploring the various buildings with a wonderful view of the River Thames. The Painted Hall is a highlight with so much to see and absorb, it doesn&#39;t matter how many times you go there is always something new to see that you didn&#39;t notice before, such is the detail in the paintings.<br /> <br /> You can visit the website <a href="https://www.ornc.org/paintedhall"><u><strong>here</strong></u></a> 0 The Best Spring Gardens in London http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-spring-gardens-in-london/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-spring-gardens-in-london/#comments Sun, 06 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-spring-gardens-in-london/ London is famed for its open spaces, like Regent’s Park and Hyde Park, but there are many hidden treasures to discover… London is famed for its open spaces, like Regent’s Park and Hyde Park, but there are many hidden treasures to discover…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_355.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Whilst you might be familiar with some of London&rsquo;s more famous locations, London is also home to some smaller and less frequented parks and gardens. We&rsquo;ve created a shortlist of our favourites.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Fenton House, Hampstead" src="/images/blogs/355_fenton-house.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 270px;" /><br /> <br /> <strong>Fenton House, Hampstead</strong><br /> Located in Hampstead, Fenton House is a little known National Trust property, with gardens almost completely unchanged in their 300-year history. In the early spring time the orchards fall into blossom, and flowers bloom in the gardens outside this traditional and historic house. A short walk from Hampstead Heath, where you&rsquo;ll find the Pergola Gardens and Kenwood House &ndash; worth a look for the early blossoming magnolia.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong><img alt="Kyoto Gardens Holland Park" src="/images/blogs/355_kyoto-garden-holland-park.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 464px;" /><br /> <br /> Kyoto Garden, Holland Park</strong><br /> Just west of central London is the beautiful Kyoto Garden, in Holland Park. Whilst Holland Park itself is the grounds of Cope Castle, originally built in the 17<sup>th</sup> century, the Kyoto Gardens were created in 1992 for the Japan Festival. The early spring-time blossoms are a gorgeous feature, but the garden is even beautiful in autumn, as the leaves change into a symphony of reds and golds.<br /> &nbsp;</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong><img alt="Wildflower Meadow London Fields" src="/images/blogs/355_london-fields.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></strong></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>Wildflower Meadow, London Fields</strong><br /> East London has been undergoing regeneration for a number of years, and Hackney council have paid particular attention to their open spaces. London Fields is one of the most popular parks in Hackney, and home to a beautiful Wildflower Meadow. Bursting into life in spring time, the wildflowers are traditionally British blooms, and even attract the local bees who produce a delicious honey.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong><img alt="Kensington Roof Gardens London" src="/images/blogs/355_kensington-roof-gardens.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 262px;" /><br /> <br /> The Roof Garden, Kensington</strong><br /> A welcome and surprising garden, on the rooftop of the old Barker &amp; Co department store in Kensington. Now home to a bar and restaurant, there are several gardens &ndash; a Tudor Garden, Spanish Garden with Moorish influences, and a woodland area. They are also home to a small flamboyance of flamingos. Call ahead for availability, as they are often booked out for private events.<br /> <strong>&nbsp;</strong></span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong><img alt="Crocus Walk Cannizaro Park" src="/images/blogs/355_crocus-walk-cannizaro-park.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></strong></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><strong>Cannizaro Park, Wimbledon</strong><br /> Boasting a range from a water garden, to a Mediterranean garden, and sunken garden to a rose garden, Cannizaro Park also has a beautiful Crocus Walk, lined with the early spring-time flowers &ndash; an annual explosion of lilac and gold that needs to be seen to be believed.</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 How to draw the perfect bath http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/how-to-draw-the-perfect-bath/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/how-to-draw-the-perfect-bath/#comments Fri, 04 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/how-to-draw-the-perfect-bath/ With all this talk of spring, let's not forget there's still a chill in the air and a well earned bath is in order. With all this talk of spring, let's not forget there's still a chill in the air and a well earned bath is in order.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_357.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Bath time is a ritual that has been lost in our busy lives &ndash; and spending time on ourselves has become the ultimate luxury for us. You deserve to take the time out to really relax and unwind, to soak in a scented bath and think of absolutely nothing. </span> <h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Draw the bath: </span></h2> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Fill the tub with both water and scent. <b><u><a href=" îhttp://www.penhaligons.com/bath-and-shower-gels/î"> A Bath &amp; Shower Gel </a></u></b> will create a rich lather, full of bubbles. Alternatively, and more lavishly, add a splash of <b><u><a href="îhttp://www.penhaligons.com/bath-oils/ î"> Bath Oil </a></u></b>&ndash; it will soften the water and create a milky texture for you to luxuriate in &ndash; leaving you moisturised and beautifully scented. </span> <h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Create an ambiance: </span></h2> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Ambiance is key to creating a relaxing environment. Light a <b><u><a href="îhttp://www.penhaligons.com/candles/î"> candle</a></u></b> to enjoy. A warm light helps counter any stress, and will fill the room in gentle fragrance whilst you languorously unwind. </span> <h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Get lost in a novel: </span></h2> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Take your latest book with you or a copy of The Penhaligon&#39;s Times, as well as a glass of fizz or wine (whichever takes your fancy) to enjoy whilst you soak to complete the experience.<br /> <br /> Allow yourself all the time you need &ndash; do not rush. </span><br /> 0 Hammam Bouquet - A True Original http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hammam-bouquet-a-true-original/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hammam-bouquet-a-true-original/#comments Thurs, 03 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hammam-bouquet-a-true-original/ Back in the late 1800s, Hammam Bouquet was more famous than Penhaligon's itself. Back in the late 1800s, Hammam Bouquet was more famous than Penhaligon's itself.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_351.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Our earliest fragrance, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/hammam-bouquet-eau-de-toilette-spray/">Hammam Bouquet</a> was created in 1872 by our founder William Penhaligon, shortly after he founded his barber shop within the Hammam Baths of Jermyn Street, Picadilly. Founded by the London and Provincial Turkish Bath Co. in 1862, Jermyn Street&#39;s first Hammam&#39;s were considered the finest in Europe.</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Hammam Bouquet" src="/images/blogs/thehammam.jpg" style="width: 303px; height: 434px;" /></span></div> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The Hammam itself was a sight to behold, the front holding three floors, the top of which William Penhaligon had taken over and entirely converted into a barber&#39;s shop with direct access to Jermyn Street by 1874. A large building, the great hall or mustaby which was open to the outer air, a middle chamber where the heat is moderate, and the inner hall, which contained the hot baths themselves.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Hammam Bouquet" src="/images/blogs/HammamFloorPlan.jpg" style="width: 642px; height: 423px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The workers of the Hammam were imported from Constantinople, bringing with them the true Turkish traditions of the Hammam from the East to the West.</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Hammam Dry Room" src="/images/blogs/HammamDryRoom.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 461px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Famously, the <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/shampooing-the-shah/">Shah of Persia visited the Jermyn Street Hammam on his tour of London in 1889</a>. William himself was said to have trimmed the Shah&#39;s hair and beard, as one of his assistants had been cleansing the Shah&#39;s beard with Hammam Bouquet &quot;which lay like the morning dew on his royal bristles and his moustache&quot;.</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Hammam Interior Room" src="/images/blogs/HammamInteriorRoom.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 405px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Unsurprisingly, Hammam Bouquet developed a cult following. Many of the famous clients of the Hammam and the Penhaligon &amp; Jeavons barbers relied upon Hammam Bouquet. Advertised within Harrod&#39;s catalogue in 1895, Hammam Bouquet was described simply as its name - having become so popular and well known that the Penhaligon name was immaterial to the consumer of the day.</span><br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Hammam Harrods Advert" src="/images/blogs/HammamHarrodsAdvert.jpg" style="width: 496px; height: 573px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">In fact, in Webster&#39;s Red Book in 1905, Penhaligon&#39;s advertised itself as &quot;The Sole Depot for The Hammam Bouquet&quot; - showing again that the perfume had grown more famous than its creator, and that Penhaligon&#39;s needed to remind the buying public that Hammam Bouquet was their own creation.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="Websters Book" src="/images/blogs/WebstersBook1905.jpg" style="width: 514px; height: 842px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Today, Hammam Bouquet is still in our line up. Smelling it is like opening a time capsule, stepping back 140 years and celebrating the Victorian obsession with the East. It captures the scent of the Hammam perfectly, the wooden ceilings, the stone floors, the dry heat, the rose and lavender oils that would have been used in treatments. Whilst it may not be to everyone&#39;s taste, those who appreciate Hammam Bouquet are loyal to our original classic, William Penhaligon&#39;s first perfume. </span><br /> 0 As Seen In The Guardian: Equinox Bloom http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/as-seen-in-the-guardian-equinox-bloom/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/as-seen-in-the-guardian-equinox-bloom/#comments Weds, 02 Mar 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/as-seen-in-the-guardian-equinox-bloom/ Our new fragrance was featured in The Guardian Our new fragrance was featured in The Guardian<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_354.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">With the promise of Spring just round the corner, our latest fragrance <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a> has caught the eye of The Guardian who included us in a piece about their new season favourites.<br /> <br /> Their top picks include a sweep of pastel eyeshadow, a delicate pop of colour on the cheeks and a lovely lilac on the nails plus a spritz of our sweet gourmand fragrance - we&#39;ve definitely got Spring scented!<br /> <br /> Read the article <a href="http://www.theguardian.com/fashion/2016/feb/28/spring-pastel-colours">here</a></span> 0 The Best Afternoon Teas in London http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-afternoon-teas-in-london/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-afternoon-teas-in-london/#comments Mon, 29 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-afternoon-teas-in-london/ The quintessentially British tradition of high tea has evolved from its earliest incarnation into always delightful and sometimes experimental treat times. The quintessentially British tradition of high tea has evolved from its earliest incarnation into always delightful and sometimes experimental treat times.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_353.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">Afternoon Tea has its roots in British aristocracy, a mid-afternoon snack of tea, sandwiches and small cakes favoured by Anne, 7th Duchess of Bedford, as a way of staving off that sinking feeling between meals (at the time, there were 2 meals per day,&nbsp; breakfast, and dinner, served at 8pm).<br /> <br /> It quickly became the afternoon practice of every fashionable lady, and has evolved into a real treat, often taken with a glass of bubbles.<br /> <br /> In celebration of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom/"><strong><u>Equinox Bloom</u></strong></a>, inspired by the transitional moment between winter and spring and the British tradition of Afternoon Tea, we&#39;ve scoured London for the finest Afternoon Tea you could possibly find.</span><br /> <br /> <h2> The Modern Afternoon Tea: Sketch &amp; Mayfair</h2> <img alt="Sketch London" src="/images/blogs/sketch-afternoon-tea.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 464px;" /><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Sketch offers probably the coolest surrounds in London for their Afternoon Tea - a blend of eccentric Britishness and continental experimentalism. Tucked just off of <a 9="" a="" able="" afternoon="" albert="" alt="BB Bakery" and="" arch="" as="" bakery="" bb="" be="" big="" both="" br="" british="" buckingham="" bus="" but="" chance="" combine="" conduit="" course="" covent="" enjoying="" experiencing="" fell="" few.="" from="" great="" historic="" href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=142" https:="" if="" img="" in="" including="" indulge="" is="" like="" ll="" london="" many="" marble="" name="" not="" of="" offers="" on="" one="" possible="" routemaster="" royal="" sandwiches="" sights="" sightseeing="" sketch.london="" span="" src="/images/blogs/bb-bakery-afternoon-tea.jpg" still="" stones="" style="font-size: 14px;" swoop="" take="" tea="" tea:="" the="" then="" throw="" time="" to="" tour.="" trip="" w1s="" westminster="" whilst="" why="" with="" would="" yes="" you="" your=""><br /> Alternatively, BB Bakery also offers an afternoon tea on-board a boat as you journey along the Thames and take in the historic sights along London&#39;s river.</a><br /> <a href="http://www.bbbakery.co.uk/"><strong><u>BB Bakery</u></strong>, 6-7 Chandos Place, WC2N 4HU</a></span><br /> <br /> <h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><a href="http://www.bbbakery.co.uk/">The Traditional Afternoon Tea: Claridges, Mayfair</a></span></h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><a href="http://www.bbbakery.co.uk/"><img alt="Claridges" src="/images/blogs/claridges-afternoon-tea.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 325px;" /><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Claridges have been serving afternoon tea for the best part of 150 years, so they certainly know how to do it with style. A very short stroll from our <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=143"><strong><u>Mayfair</u></strong></a> store on Brook Street, Claridges is perfect to a fault - finger sandwiches and warm scones with gorgeous pastries are all served in the stunning Foyer, an art-deco feast for the eyes.<br /> <br /> As a London institution, Claridges does suggest a dress-code, so ensure you follow it <em>to a tea</em> (sorry). <a href="http://www.claridges.co.uk/"><strong><u>Claridges</u></strong></a>, Brook St, W1K 4HR</span></a></span><br /> <br /> <h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><a href="http://www.bbbakery.co.uk/">The Eccentric Afternoon Tea: The Fan Museum in Greenwich</a></span></h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><a href="http://www.bbbakery.co.uk/"><img alt="Fan Museum Greewich" src="/images/blogs/fan-museum-afternoon-tea.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 387px;" /><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The Fan Museum in Greenwich is one of London&#39;s most wonderfully eccentric places &amp; the only museum in the UK dedicated to the history of fans, with pieces dating back to the 12th century. Afternoon Tea at The Fan Museum is served in the beautiful and muraled Orangery, overlooking a secret garden.<br /> <br /> The Orangery is only accessible to visitors to the museum, which means you must pay the entry fee of &pound;4, but believe us when we tell you this hidden gem is worth the trip even if you don&#39;t stop for the tea.<br /> <u><strong><a href="https://www.thefanmuseum.org.uk/">The Fan Museum</a></strong></u>, 12 Crooms Hill, SE10 8ER</span><br /> </a></span> 0 Hidden London: Notting Hill http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-notting-hill/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-notting-hill/#comments Mon, 29 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-notting-hill/ Next in our (not so) Hidden London series is Notting Hill, we've chosen five places that are definitely worth a visit. Perhaps a nice day trip with Mother in mind. Next in our (not so) Hidden London series is Notting Hill, we've chosen five places that are definitely worth a visit. Perhaps a nice day trip with Mother in mind.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_340.jpg"<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Notting Hill is a neighbourhood in West London, famed for it&#39;s carnival and the 1999 film starring Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts and of course, Portabello Market. It is a beautiful part of London and most weekends it&#39;s packed with both tourists and locals alike.<br /> <br /> Notting Hill itself isn&#39;t exactly hidden so we&#39;ve picked our top 5 Notting Hill gems that you may or may not have heard of that are definitely worth a visit.<br /> <br /> <strong>1. <u><a href="https://electriccinema.co.uk">Electric Cinema</a></u></strong><br /> The Electric is one of the oldest cinema&#39;s in London and it&#39;s not your average cinema. Perfect for a romantic date, the decor is luxurious and makes the film only a part of the experience, which is always an enjoyable one.<br /> <br /> <strong>2. <u><a href="http://www.tabernaclew11.com">The Tabernacle</a></u></strong><br /> The Tabernacle is an impressive building tucked away on Powis Square in Notting Hill. Perfect for a Pimms outside in the Summer and lots of goings-on throughout the year it&#39;s a great place to find out something new. There are always art exhibits, theatrical performances, book clubs, yoga lessons and gigs. Not forgetting a lovely Sunday brunch!<br /> <br /> <strong>3. <u><a href="http://www.wildflowercafe.co.uk">The Wildflower Cafe</a></u></strong><br /> Technically this is more in the direction of Westbourne Grove but defintely not to be missed for lunch, it&#39;s a cafe/florist by day and a bistro by night with a small menu of delicious foods. It&#39;s a very pretty place to eat, but with the substance of having nice food too. They are passionate about flowers and cake, which gets a big tick from us.<br /> <br /> <strong>4. <u><a href="http://www.trailerhappiness.com">Trailer Happiness</a></u></strong><br /> It&#39;s no secret that we at Penhaligon&#39;s enjoy a good cocktail, and Trailer Happiness is known for making very good cocktails. Booking is essential and don&#39;t be put off by the &#39;kitsch&#39; decor, the staff are excellent and the 60s tunes don&#39;t go amiss either.<br /> <br /> <strong>5. <a href="http://www.portobelloroad.co.uk/"><u>Portobello Road Market</u></a></strong><br /> Ok we know this is not a hidden gem, it&#39;s a very well known one but it&#39;s a gem none the less. The atmosphere is wonderful and there are always new things to see and do, wandering through of a weekend you&#39;re sure to find something for the home or yourself that is not only original but always a great reminder of the day you discovered it.</span> 0 The Penhaligon’s Tea Parlour http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-tea-parlour/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-tea-parlour/#comments Fri, 26 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-tea-parlour/ In celebration of our newest fragrance, Equinox Bloom we hosted a press event with our very own Tea Parlour. In celebration of our newest fragrance, Equinox Bloom we hosted a press event with our very own Tea Parlour.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_352.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">As the Spring gets ever closer, so does the day we unveil our latest fragrance Equinox Bloom. Our very first gourmand fragrance inspired by the Spring Equinox and the tradition of Afternoon Tea. In celebration we hosted a press event with our very own Penhaligon&rsquo;s Tea Parlour.</span><br /> &nbsp; <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="Penhaligon's Tea Parlour" src="/images/blogs/352_IMG_0156.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 464px;" /></div> &nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Guests were greeted by a colourful array of roses, tulips, peonies and irises, all tied into bouquets of their choice by the very talented By Appointment Design florists.&nbsp; With bouquet orders placed guests were invited downstairs to enjoy afternoon tea surrounded by walls of hanging flowers. This beautiful installation symbolised the Winter yielding to Spring, creating an uplifting atmosphere very much like the fragrance itself.</span><br /> &nbsp; <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="Equinox Bloom" src="/images/blogs/DSF4944conorbearycopyrightuntitled.jpg" style="width: 412px; height: 618px;" /></div> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Equinox Bloom was proudly taking place amongst this floral rhapsody, unveiling its floral gourmand notes to everyone&rsquo;s delight. The nose behind this fragrance is the Master Perfumer Olivier Cresp who describes it as &ldquo;a trendy, modern inflexion to the generous floral bouquet. This luxurious and abundant refinement reflects Penhaligon&acute;s generosity in fragrances in a perfect way.&quot;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As everyone sipped on tea and Bloom Gin cocktails, we learned more about the composition of Equinox Bloom from the ingredients under glass cloches: violet leaves, jasmine sambac and brown sugar. Indeed the fragrance plays with an olfactory palette inspired by the delights of high tea, accompanied by the heady bouquet of the first sweet Spring flowers. Delicious notes of Chantilly, Frangipani and Brown Sugar are blended with violet leaves, orange blossom absolute and jasmine sambac, rounded with the deep, Oriental richness of Benzoin Siam and Ambrox.</span><br /> &nbsp; <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="Penhaligon's Equinox Bloom" src="/images/blogs/DSF4994conorbearycopyrightuntitled.jpg" style="width: 412px; height: 618px;" /></div> &nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">As the delicious aroma of Equinox Bloom travelled through the room, so did the praise: &ldquo;quintessentially English&rdquo;, &ldquo;addictive and feminine&rdquo;, &ldquo;heady and uplifting&rdquo;.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Spring is definitely waiting around the corner.<br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 10px;">Images Copyright Conor Beary 2016.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Hidden London: Barbican http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-barbican/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-barbican/#comments Mon, 22 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-barbican/ Continuing the Hidden London series we explore the Barbican in the City of London. Continuing the Hidden London series we explore the Barbican in the City of London.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_339.jpg"<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Continuing the Hidden London series we explore the Barbican in the City of London.<br /> <br /> The Barbican Centre in the City of London is a cultural hub and attracts many different types of people. Londoners know it as a place to catch a film, or a musical performance. Others travel from all over the country to see exhibitions there, or a theatre production and of course it&#39;s the home of the London Symphony Orchestra.<br /> <br /> It is an imposing building, which is in fact part of the Barbican Estate, also housing over 4000 residents, as well as the Guildhall School of Music &amp; Drama. It offers a different perspective on what is the financial district of the City balancing the cultural and creative mix. Definitely worth a visit if you like exploring of a weekend or simply a place to meet friends for an alternative evening out after work.<br /> <br /> We think it would be an ideal place to take mother on Mothering Sunday. Soak up a little culture at The Shakespeare Weekender or treat her to an Afternoon Tea in the Conservatory<br /> <br /> For all the events and goings-on at the Barbican visit their website: <a href="http://www.barbican.org.uk">http://www.barbican.org.uk</a></span><br /> 0 Spring Flower Tips from JamJar http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spring-flower-tips-from-jamjar/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spring-flower-tips-from-jamjar/#comments Sun, 14 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - JamJar http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spring-flower-tips-from-jamjar/ Melissa from JamJar Flowers talks us through their Spring flower tips and how to get the best blooms of the season. Melissa from JamJar Flowers talks us through their Spring flower tips and how to get the best blooms of the season.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_338.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">JamJar the bespoke London florists, who Penhaligon&rsquo;s have worked with us on numerous projects, talk about what they know best....... flowers! JamJar talk us through the best flowers to have in your home for winter and spring.<br /> <br /> <strong>Winter</strong> &ndash; In December flowers are in short supply. Most are curled up underground in bulbs or seeds waiting for the warm weather however there are always some who will brave the cold and the short dark days.<br /> <br /> Surprisingly fragile little cyclamen will stand any amount of cold weather in the window boxes and gardens of relatively sheltered London gardens and mahonia with its great yellow spikes of fragrant flowers always bring a cheerful note to winter gardens.<br /> <br /> However foliage is the real star in December, all sorts of grey green eucalyptus, bright shiny holly with its vibrant red berries, viburnum tinus with dark red buds and tiny white flowers, deli- cate pointed ivy and the parasite mistletoe which hangs in great chandeliers from the oak trees in Hampton Court and all across the countryside is another Christmas favourite.<br /> <br /> At the JamJar studios we love to use hellebores otherwise known as Christmas or Lenten rose, ranunculus, paper white narcissi and anemones. All these are really spring flowers but they are already in the market and their fragile beauty seems to suit the winter months and the short dark days. In the end the hellebore has to be the JamJar Christmas star. It is a temperamental flower that doesn&rsquo;t like mixing with other flowers much, has a tendency to hang it&rsquo;s head shyly and sometimes to droop and die for no reason but despite all these personality disorders it is worth keeping on trying with this fragile bloom.<br /> <br /> <strong>Spring</strong> &ndash; The first signs of Spring brings hope to us all. Tiny snowdrops bravely push their way through the icy ground followed by blossom, daffodils, grape hyacinths and then tulips. Grey skies give way to light on the solstice which encourages the bulbs to uncurl and release their treasure. Buds arrive on the trees and the air is full of promise.<br /> <br /> At the JamJar Studios we love to use these Spring flowers as they arrive in the market although they are not always the easiest. Flowers like tulips seem to have almost a life of their own. They stand up straight then collapse and uncurl their petals revealing the stamens and calyx like a petulant girl in a party dress. They also continue to grow whilst they are in the vase which is why we like to use tulips on their own then they can do their thing without upsetting the other flowers in the arrangement.<br /> <br /> Snake head fritillaries are another favourite garden flower which are beautiful in jamjar arrangements or on their own in a bottle or narrow necked vase. Masses of grape hyacinths make lovely arrangements and smell divine.<br /> <br /> The ubiquitous daffodil, also smells gorgeous and comes in many shades through white, cream yellow to a deep egg yolk orange. One of our favourite jobs last Spring we worked with Penhaligon&rsquo;s on the launch of their daffodil based scent &ldquo;Ostara&rdquo;. Big pickle jars of deliciously scented daffs were delivered to clients by handsome boys.<br /> <br /> But our absolute favourite Spring flowers are great branches of blossom which burst to life in the vase, magnolia, prunus, cherry or quince. It&rsquo;s hard to choose which is our favourite but we love this image of cherry blossom from an arrangement we did for Spring Restaurant.</span><br /> <br /> <em>Melissa Alexander, JamJar</em></span><br /> 0 Hidden London: Columbia Road http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-columbia-road/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-columbia-road/#comments Tues, 02 Feb 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-columbia-road/ Introducing Hidden London. In this series we see through the eyes of other Londoners, whether native or adopted, about the secret London they’ve discovered and love... Introducing Hidden London. In this series we see through the eyes of other Londoners, whether native or adopted, about the secret London they’ve discovered and love... <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_337.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> As a company established in London and with our roots firmly planted here, there are hundreds of secret places we treasure in this most eclectic and surprising city; a city where every corner has a story and every alleyway a tale. In this series we&nbsp;see&nbsp;through the eyes of other Londoners, whether native or adopted, about the secret London they&rsquo;ve discovered and love...<br /> <br /> COLUMBIA ROAD FLOWER MARKET<br /> <br /> Columbia Road in East London is the perfect place to while away a Sunday morning. Coffee in hand and an armful of fragrant blooms, followed by a late brunch in one of the many laid back eateries, it&#39;s right up our street. As we impatiently wait for Spring, the flower market is bursting with colour, tulips in every hue, the bright dazzle of daffodils. The atmosphere is always bustling, live music fills the air and the surrounding shops are filled with tempting treats, whether they be food to nibble or antiques to peruse. No two weekends ever feel the same and the constant changing of the flowers on offer as the seasons roll by is a feast for the eyes.<br /> <br /> As Valentines Day falls on a Sunday this year we recommend spending the day wandering around Columbia Road, because nothing says Valentines like roses and there&#39;s more than a few to choose from! Explore the market and all it has to offer, then enjoy a lazy lunch and of course as we are partial to a floral bouquet might we be so bold to recommend a more permanent reminder of the day and the perfect Valentine gift. <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/ellenisia-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Ellenisia</strong></u></a> is beautiful array of honeyed white flowers and of course for Spring <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/ostara-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Ostara</strong></u></a> is like the freshest bunch of daffodils bottled!&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 In Conversation with Olivier Cresp http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-olivier-cresp/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-olivier-cresp/#comments Weds, 20 Jan 2016 00:00:00 GMT Marketing Team http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/in-conversation-with-olivier-cresp/ We spoke to Master Perfumer Olivier Cresp, creator of Juniper Sling and our next fragrance about what inspires him. We spoke to Master Perfumer Olivier Cresp, creator of Juniper Sling and our next fragrance about what inspires him.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_334.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>How did you start out in Perfume?</strong><br /> <br /> I have been a perfumer since 1975. I started at Firmenich in 1992 and became a Master Perfumer in 2006. As my childhood included an intensive training on raw materials I could quickly focus on formulation. Like many of my peers, I started working on technical products to better improve the technical side of my craft before I joined a fine fragrance team.<br /> <br /> <strong>Tell us a little about your family history with perfume and the famous Grasse region in France?</strong><br /> <br /> My great grandfather cultivated roses and jasmine and my father and grandfather traded in raw materials. Perfumery is at the heart of my family history and heritage. My olfactory memory is still intact. I can remember family meals where we talked of nothing but perfume. There were fields of flowers all around Grasse in those days. It was wonderful! I would go to smell the jasmine that blossomed between May and September, along with the tuberose, the May roses and the violets. I would watch the extraction process of lavender, lavandin and iris. That was the environment I grew up in. If I had been born somewhere else, I might not be doing what I do today.<br /> <br /> <strong>Were your parents supportive of you becoming a perfumer?</strong><br /> <br /> I come from a family of three children, and we all became perfumers. More than just supportive, my parents and my grandparents actually taught us everything! Most evenings, just as other children might listen to a bedtime story, the Cresp family would smell the fresh blooms gathered that day and would recognize them. The family secrets have since been passed on to my only son, Sebastien who became a perfumer a year ago.<br /> <br /> <strong>Do you remember making your first fragrance? What were your sensations at the time?</strong><br /> <br /> I do remember that very special experience. I was about 9 or 10. I had collected all the flowers I could find in my parent&rsquo;s garden. There was jasmine, roses, the flowers from various fruit trees ... I had them macerated in alcohol that I bought in the local pharmacy. The result was pretty poor and I remember how disappointed I felt. At the time, I didn&rsquo;t know anything about fragrance formulas.<br /> <br /> <strong>What are your favourite materials and scents to work with?</strong><br /> <br /> A few years ago, I fell in love with cedar wood! We have an extraordinary quality in our repertoire! I use it in all my creations, feminine and masculine, in the same way. It brings a fabulous creamy, silky texture, with a sensuous richness and an intense and elegant trail...It has so many qualities! This is truly my signature.<br /> <br /> <strong>How many fragrances do you work on at a time?</strong><br /> <br /> I am used to working on multiple projects at once and I appreciate the rhythm that this provides. It affords the opportunity to view each product separately, then to step back, think about other ideas and projects before returning to the initial scent with fresh ideas and a more objective view. Fragrance development includes a lot of necessary pauses to ensure that the progression stays fresh and inspired. You do not progress creatively on a regular basis. In fact, progression on a fragrance is typically a series of small steps until you reach the final goal.<br /> <br /> <strong>How do you juggle so many?</strong><br /> <br /> By juggling many projects I feel alive!<br /> <br /> <strong>What sort of challenges do you face during the production of a fragrance?</strong><br /> <br /> For each project, I face a different challenge as all of my projects are very different. This is the exciting part of my life as a creator. My days are never the same and are always bringing fresh inspiration. As soon as I have a beautiful idea on mind, my challenge is to translate it into the most exquisite fragrance.<br /> <br /> <strong>Is there a particular fragrance you would love to make but haven&rsquo;t had the chance?</strong><br /> <br /> Shalimar. I have always been very impressed by this refined scent and its seductive nature.<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe your style? You have described it as &lsquo;minimalist&rsquo; before...</strong><br /> <br /> I confirm I have a very minimalist style. Every day I have the ability to create from a palette of 400 ingredients, but I prefer to use only 20-30 of them to understand them more deeply and so I can adapt them more easily, if need be!<br /> <br /> <strong>Where do you live now? Are you inspired by your surroundings?</strong><br /> <br /> I live in Paris but remain very closely connected to Grasse. I used to return to the region for vacations and I am much involved in all of Firmenich&rsquo;s activities there, particularly with research and development for our Ingredient Division. My surroundings and all my experiences continue to inspire me every day and everywhere I go.<br /> <br /> <strong>We read that you knew that you wanted to be a perfumer at age 7! Do you still remember this?</strong><br /> <br /> Of course I do! As you can see I have never deviated from that childhood ambition.<br /> <br /> <strong>Describe your typical day?</strong><br /> <br /> My working day typically begins at 9:30am and ends at 8pm. I like to start the day by smelling natural or synthetic ingredients, just to open my mind and find a source inspiration. The main portion of day is then dedicated to enriching my new formula, in collaboration with my assistants and discussions with both the Firmenich development teams and our clients. Above all, my job involves sharing and passion. An important part of my time is also dedicated to mentoring the younger perfumers. I like to share my experiences with them, and they are keen to express their new ideas.</span><br /> 0 The Penhaligon's Times is Back http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-times-is-back/ http://www.penhaligons.comhttp://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-times-is-back/#comments Mon, 18 Jan 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-times-is-back/ The second edition of the Penhaligon's Times is on it's way. The second edition of the Penhaligon's Times is on it's way.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_345.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>A LETTER FROM THE EDITOR.</strong><br /> <br /> The first edition of the Penhaligon&#39;s Times was created to celebrate the launch of our new store in New York City and now we&#39;ve done it again! The second edition of The Penhaligon&rsquo;s Times discovers all things fragrant and a few of our favourite things.<br /> <br /> We talked to everyone from grooming experts, master perfumers, timeless professionals, bloggers and florists to introduce you to the fragrant world of Penhaligon&rsquo;s London.</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">See Hidden London through the eyes of two lifestyle bloggers, discover our timeless fragrances and read about three timeless professionals and how they turned their unique passion into a career.<br /> <br /> You can pick up a copy this weekend at our Covent Garden, Regent Street or Mayfair stores. Or we&#39;ll pop one in your online orders from next week.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>Contributors include:</em><br /> <br /> Olivier Cresp<br /> Master Perfumer<br /> <br /> Nick Cox<br /> Grooming Guide<br /> <br /> Nick Gilbert<br /> Fragrance Expert<br /> <br /> Persolaise Fragrance<br /> Blogger<br /> <br /> Chris Pollard<br /> Grooming Expert</span><br /> <br /> &amp; many more.</span><br /> 0