Bluebells

  • Posted on 18th April 2012 by Laura
  • The common bluebell is a true sign of British springtime. There is something quite ethereal about a sea of bluebells covering woodlands in a haze of purpley blue. This spectacular botannical display is only found in northern Europe, with Britain containing more than half of the world’s population.

  • In 1850, Emily Bronte described how:

    ‘‘The Bluebell is the sweetest flower
    That waves in summer air:
    Its blossoms have the mightiest power
    To soothe my spirit’s care.’

    In the Victorian art of floriography, the bluebell represented humility and constancy. The presence of  a bluebell in a floral bouquet would have symbolised one’s unwavering devotion to their love, through the means of this coded message.

    Floriography of Bluebells

    Our cult scent, Bluebell was originally created in 1978 and is the pure unadulterated distillation of the scent of bluebell woods. Complex and utterly distinctive, Bluebell is a soliflore scent, evocative of wet earth, moss and rain; it softly detonates across your scent receptors.  Close your eyes….imagine you are standing in a bluebell wood, dappled in bright spring sunshine, a light breeze dancing through the leaves. Inhale…..it has just rained… a spring shower. All around you, soft sounds, a sudden overwhelming scent, green and mossy: a carpet of bluebells, rain in the air, loamy wet bark, damp grass and floral notes.

    Bluebell by Penhaligons

    We’ve told you what Bluebells mean in the language of flowers but can you decode this bouquet below? Leave a comment below telling us what you think it is and one lucky winner will be picked at random to win a 100ml bottle of Bluebell!

    Flowers

    Keep your eyes peeled for more posts on the traditions of the language of flowers. Visit our Facebook page to learn more about weekly competitions we’ll be holding to win a 100ml fragrance from our soliflore range.    

    • Comments
    • Ms
    • by anonymous
    • I'm imagining a couple who have separated and the man is trying to win back the woman's love. The flowers are saying, "My heart aches for you and I am longing for a new beginning."
    • Comment
    • by anonymous
    • I believe this bouquet says, with its lovely red carnations, "My heart aches for you!" I'm not sure what the beautiful green flower is, but it looks somewhat like an orchid, indicating Love, Beauty, Refinement, Beautiful Lady. My Aunt Linda would have known. She was an avid gardener and her favorite perfume was Bluebells. She was a beautiful lady, and my heart does ache for her. I wish we could have another talk like we used to do!
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