Ostara: A Master's Secrets

  • Posted on 31st March 2015 by Nick

  • When we held our press event for Ostara last November, we were lucky enough to have Bertrand explain the inspiration, effects and secrets that make Ostara so unique.

    Last Spring we took Bertrand to Kew Gardens to experience the seas of Daffodils, which reminded him of his childhood in Auvergne, the region of France where Narcissus (the fragrant sister of the daffodil) is grown for the perfume industry. Narcissus therefore became the heart of Ostara - needed to create the illusion of daffodils, as there is no essential oil to extract from daffodils themself.

    The illusion of daffodils is completed with a floral bouquet: ylang ylang is present to add yellow, cyclamen brings the suggestion of morning dew, hyacinth for green freshness, wisteria as another narcotic spring flower, and hawthorn for its hedgerow effect.

    But daffodils are not just a sunny yellow flower - they sit atop a stem of verdant green. Bertrand plays with the “happiness from the green effects we get in spring flowers” adding violet leaf for a gentle leather effect, a green leaf effect (described by Bertrand as "just like poison ivy") alongside juniper and spearmint bring the sappy green quality to the fragrance.

    Bertrand describes Ostara as “a bouquet of golden daffodils, wrapped in delicate white satin”. The effect of white satin comes from the combination of balsamic notes and musks, which plays a very important role in creating haziness in Ostara. Bertrand explains that a hazy solar effect is needed because “in springtime, there is sun, but it’s not the same sun as summer when it is intense”. Blackcurrant and clementine are included to bring further sunlight to the fragrance, as well as unprecedented overdose of pink pepper for a colourful and sparkling effect.

    This combination of effects makes Ostara such a radiant springtime soliflore.