The Penhaligon's Times http://www.penhaligons.com Sun, 04 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT http://www.penhaligons.com en hourly 1 Christmas Drinks - Smoking Bishop http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/#comments Fri, 02 Dec 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/christmas-drinks-smoking-bishop/ In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens’s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob’s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop! In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens’s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob’s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_452.jpg"<br/><br/><h1 align="center"> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Christmas drinks &nbsp;- Smoking Bishop</span></h1> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> &ldquo;A merrier Christmas, Bob, my good fellow, than I have given you for many a year! I&rsquo;ll raise your salary, and endeavour to assist your struggling family, and we will discuss your affairs this very afternoon over a bowl of smoking bishop, Bob!&rdquo;<br /> A Christmas Carol<br /> &nbsp;<br /> In the heart-warming final scene of the Charles Dickens&rsquo;s classic, Scrooge is a changed man. He has seen the error of his ways and will be outlining how he will be improving Bob&rsquo;s work/life balance over a cup of a traditional Christmas drink, Smoking Bishop! This is a delicious, zesty and spicy mulled wine fortified with port. In fact, if all work appraisals were conducted in a similar way, I am certain employee satisfaction would be much improved!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The word &lsquo;bishop&rsquo; was a 19<sup>th</sup> century euphemism for port. In fact, if you failed to pass the port around the table after dinner, the polite way of chivying the decanter to come your way was to ask, &ldquo;<em>Do you know the Bishop of Norwich?</em>&rdquo; Smoking bishop refers to the heating of the spicy port elixir until a delicious steam is seen rising from the pan. This shows the drink is ready to serve in warmed glasses. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> During the long, cold nights around the winter solstice, is there a more perfect drink? Warming and sweet, the port and oranges capture Iberian sunshine and the spices take us to exotic climes just in time for the Winter sun break advertising!</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Recipe:<br /> (Serves 8)<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 5 unpeeled oranges &ndash; sweet or Seville will do<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half a?large unpeeled <a href="http://www.food.com/about/grapefruit-243">grapefruit</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 60g soft brown <a href="http://www.food.com/about/sugar-139">sugar</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 20 ?<a href="http://www.food.com/about/clove-325">cloves</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 2 sticks of cinnamon<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1litre strong <a href="http://www.food.com/about/wine-184">red wine</a><br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 500 ml ruby port</span><br /> <h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Heat the oven to 180&ordf;<br /> <br /> Wash the fruit and cook on a foil lined baking tray until they become pale brown. Turn once.</span></h2> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Stud each fruit with the cloves.<br /> Heat a large earthenware bowl and add the fruit.<br /> Add the sugar and the red wine, cover and store in a warm place (an airing cupboard is perfect!)<br /> After about a day of muddling, squeeze the fruit to extract the juice, and strain into a saucepan.<br /> Add the port and warm thoroughly, but don&rsquo;t boil.<br /> Taste. You can add a little lemon juice if you like the drink a little sharper, some orange juice if the oranges were not very juicy or mix in a little sugar syrup if you prefer it sweeter.<br /> Serve in warmed glasses.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Here are some fun variations to make if you have the time and energy!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archbishop">Archbishop</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claret">claret</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beadle">Beadle</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger_wine">ginger wine</a> and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raisin">raisins</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cardinal_(Catholicism)">Cardinal</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champagne">Champagne</a> or <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhine_wine">Rhine wine</a><br /> Smoking <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pope">Pope</a> &mdash; made with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burgundy_wine">burgundy</a><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Parlour Games - Reverend Crawley's Game http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/#comments Weds, 30 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/parlour-games-reverend-crawleys-game/ Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband ever so feel slightly uncomfortable. Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband ever so feel slightly uncomfortable.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_442.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> <em>This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> <br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games. .</em>&nbsp;<br /> <br /> &nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <strong>Reverend Crawley&#39;s Games:</strong><br /> <br /> We don&#39;t the identity of the clergyman who created this game or why his name was given to it but nevertheless it is a fun game. It is a winning combination of gentle exercise, moments of involuntary closeness and a surprising outcome.<br /> <br /> <strong>The rules:</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Everybody stands in a circle.<br /> Each player then holds hands with another player, but the hands may not be those of the person next to them, and they may not hold both hands with the same person.<br /> This creates a large human knot.<br /> The group now has to work out how to untangle the knot without anyone letting go of any hands.<br /> This involves twisting and contorting and should end in one or two circles of people.<br /> <br /> <strong>The Family Christmas</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Lady Blanche loves parlour games. She loves the cosy setting, the temporary relaxation of social mores and how it can make her husband ever so feel slightly uncomfortable. She has many favourite games in her repertoire including the widely inappropriate Forfeits, however, this year&rsquo;s pet game is &ldquo;Reverend Crawley&rsquo;s Game&rdquo;. Enthusiastically, she gets everyone to hold hands to form a human knot. She studies the group to see if anyone is revealing anything or holding hands with anyone they shouldn&rsquo;t be. She is slightly shocked to see that her daughter hasn&rsquo;t made any attempt to be near her own husband throughout the whole proceedings and is not slow to notice that the Duke has managed to grab the hand of the young Major. She also sees her husband, Lord George avoiding the hands of any of the young women being proffered to him. He is muttering to himself &ldquo;the flesh is weak&rdquo;. It is indiscernible to anyone but her; she has heard this mantra on many occasions although he does not even realize he is giving away any secrets. &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Once everyone is in a good muddle, the task of undoing the knot begins. Young women walk under linked arms and step over grasped hands. She notices the Duchess&rsquo;s lips are almost touching the cheek of a young man opposite as she tries to step through his crossed arms. The Duke appears to be breathing down the collar of the same man, which makes for very uncomfortable viewing. Does anyone else feel that the room is hot all of a sudden? The writhing and undoing of the bond continues &ndash; nobody expects to be able to get this undone but as the game continues, suddenly everyone is amazed that they are now in one enormous ring. Ever so slightly embarrassed, Lord George suggests a calming round of Kim&rsquo;s Game&hellip;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Christmas Drinks - Wassail http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/#comments Tues, 29 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/christmas-drinks-wassail/ Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a wassailing bowl... Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a wassailing bowl...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_446.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <h1 align="center"> Wassail</h1> <br /> Wassail is a hot, mulled Yuletide drink traditionally taken from a &lsquo;wassailing bowl&rsquo;. One of the earliest versions of this drink was called &ldquo;Lambswool&rdquo; which was basically mead, heated up with the addition of roasted crab apples. The drink would be shaken, stirred or transferred backwards and forwards between two jugs or tankards, until the apples burst creating a foam that resembled lamb&rsquo;s wool.<br /> <br /> <br /> Later, the drink was more likely to be a mulled cider made with sugar, nutmeg, cinnamon and ginger but still drunk from a large communal bowl. These bowls were usually wooden but were also made from pottery or tin and had handles to make it easier to share. Very often slices of toast would be dropped into the drink. These would float on the surface for a while before absorbing the alcohol, dropping to the bottom and being eaten as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sop">sops</a> once the liquid had all gone.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>The Recipe:</strong><br /> <br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 1 litre of traditional real ale or traditional cider<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 4 small cooking apples, cored but kept whole<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half a nutmeg freshly grated<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half tsp ground ginger<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Half tsp ground cinnamon<br /> &bull;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 100g brown sugar<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Apples:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Preheat the oven 120C<br /> Prepare the apples in advance so they are ready when you want to put them into the lambswool to serve<br /> Lightly grease the baking tray and arrange the cored apples about 6cm apart<br /> Bake the apples at 120C for about an hour until they become soft and pulpy and the skins are easy to peel away<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Beer or Cider:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Add sugar to a large high-sided, thick- bottomed saucepan<br /> Cover the sugar in a small amount of the ale (or cider) and heat gently<br /> Stir continuously until the sugar has dissolved<br /> Then add in the ground ginger, cinnamon and grate in the nutmeg<br /> Stir, and keeping the pan on a gentle simmer, slowly add in all the rest of the ale (or cider). Leave for 10 minutes on a very gentle heat<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Take the baked apples out of the oven to cool slightly for 10 minutes<br /> Scoop out the baked flesh into a bowl, then take a fork and mash the apple pulp, while it is still warm, into a smooth pur&eacute;e with no lumps, pips or bits of skin<br /> Add the apple pur&eacute;e into the ale (or cider) lambswool, mixing it in with a whisk<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Let the saucepan continue to warm everything through for thirty minutes, on a very gentle heat, until ready to drink. When warmed through use the whisk again for a couple of minutes to briskly and vigorously froth the drink up and mix everything together<br /> The apple and light froth will float to the surface, and depending on how much you have whisked it, the more it looks like lamb&rsquo;s wool<br /> Ladle the hot Lambswool into heat-proof mugs or glasses and grate over some nutmeg<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Serves 4<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>The History:</strong><br /> <br /> Wassailing is an ancient mid-winter tradition that pre-dates Christianity. In the depths of winter, villagers would attempt to scare off evil spirits and demons to ensure good crops for the year ahead. Wassailing included marching around the fields and orchards, shouting loudly and pouring cider on the plants and fruit trees. This custom has died out in many parts although it is still practiced in the cider-producing counties of England.<br /> <br /> <br /> In the Middle Ages, wassailing was a time for peasants to knock on the door of their feudal lord and demand food, drink and charity in exchange for well wishes of &lsquo;Waes Hail&rsquo; or &lsquo;Good Health&rsquo;. Most landlords would oblige as they did not wish to risk a curse or probably worse still have their estates vandalized. We can see a hint at this rather sinister custom in the classic Dickensian hymn, &ldquo;We Wish You a Merry Christmas&rdquo; the lyrics of which are below. Wassailers would stand outside the door to their landlord&rsquo;s house and call for a figgy pudding and a cup of good cheer (wassail). They wouldn&rsquo;t leave until they got some.<br /> <br /> <br /> More recently, &ldquo;Wassailing&rdquo; is more commonly known as &ldquo;Caroling&rdquo; where people knock on neighbours&rsquo; doors and sing to the household in exchange for a donation to charity. Another version is to sing outside a pub where the landlord might offer a free drink and the customers, loosened by a festive glass of alcohol or two, may reach further into their pockets than normal.<br /> <h1> &nbsp;</h1> <br /> <br /> <h1> &nbsp;</h1> 0 Parlour Games - Kim's Game http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-kims-game/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/parlour-games-kims-game/#comments Mon, 28 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/parlour-games-kims-game/ More from our Christmas with Penhaligon's Portraits family series. A time for Parlour games and scandal... More from our Christmas with Penhaligon's Portraits family series. A time for Parlour games and scandal...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_443.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> <br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games. Kim&#39;s Game is a simple memory game, named after Rudyard Kipling&rsquo;s novel, Kim, published in 1901. This was a new game for a new era. It was primarily a children&rsquo;s game but many adults liked the simplicity and benign nature of the game. This game will be anything but!</em></span><br /> <br /> <p> <span style="font-size:14px;">Kim&#39;s Game is a simple memory game, named after Rudyard Kipling&rsquo;s novel, Kim, published in 1901. This was a new game for a new era. It was primarily a children&rsquo;s game but many adults liked the simplicity and benign nature of the game. This game will be anything but!</span></p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">&nbsp;<br /> The rules of Kim&rsquo;s <span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Game:</span><br /> &nbsp;</span> <p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">A tray is prepared containing a selection of small random articles and items. The participants are given some time to look at the tray to remember the contents.</span></p> <span style="font-size: 14px;">The tray is covered or removed, and the players then try to make a list of the articles.<br /> It is much harder than it sounds and the memory plays many tricks.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <u>The Family Christmas</u><br /> <br /> Christmas is an odd time of year for Lord George. He is never more uncomfortable than when he has to perform the role of patriarch for more than a few hours. The Lord misses the freedom of London, his club and his secret trysts. He likes to show that he is the benevolent father and is generous with his Christmas gifts; maybe in an attempt to buy their favour and discretion for yet another year. To him, parlour games are puerile, potentially embarrassing and he never quite understands why his family revels in them quite as much as they do. Some games get out of control and this is where Lord George steps in with his suggestion of a new game.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> He asks a member of staff to get the tray prepared. He does not know what is going to be included. This year the tray comes out and the party jostles in to position to get a good view of the items to be remembered. There are 12 pieces on the tray; the Duke looks at these in stunned silence. It is like someone has read his mind and placed the most important and intimate aspects of his life in full view of friends and family.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> His family are a little shocked by what is sitting on the tray in front of them but luckily the guests do not get the significance of some of the pieces and find it all good clean fun!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The items include:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> A cigar<br /> A card from his club<br /> An empty bottle of Armagnac<br /> A lady&rsquo;s handkerchief embroidered with the letter &lsquo;C&rsquo;<br /> A pocket watch<br /> An unpaid invoice from his tailor<br /> A hip flask<br /> A trilby hat<br /> A crucifix<br /> A cricket ball<br /> A hotel key<br /> A revolver<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As everyone is looking at each item in turn, hoping to be able to recall the list when the time arises, Lord George catches the eye of Lady Blanche. She holds his gaze as she picks up the handkerchief as if to examine the needlework. He reddens and rings for the tray to be taken away.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Holidays are Coming... http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/holidays-are-coming/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/holidays-are-coming/#comments Thurs, 24 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/holidays-are-coming/ Our Christmas Edition Stag Heads are coming to town... Our Christmas Edition Stag Heads are coming to town...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_447.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Here at Penhaligon&#39;s HQ its officially Christmas. We are well underway with decking the halls across all of our stores, why not pop-in to see for yourself? We now have extended Christmas hours, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/">see here.&nbsp;</a></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Xmas1.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">If that doesn&#39;t tempt you, here&#39;s a sneak peak at our Christmas Edition Stag Heads...</span></div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Sprayed%20Stags%20(4).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> 0 A Scent-imental Journey by Jessica A. Volz http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/#comments Weds, 23 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Jessica /blog/gardenia-daydreams-a-scent-imental-journey-by-jessica-a-volz/ While some fragrances in Penhaligon’s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, Gardenia has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible... While some fragrances in Penhaligon’s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, Gardenia has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_428.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">When facing the conundrum of packing for treks by train and by Tube, the scent-imental need not be sacrificed for the so-called practical. Shedding kilos may help when tasked with whisking yourself and your bags up flights of stairs without falling head over heels, but at the end of the day, regrets are regrets. And there is one article that I would never dream of embarking on a voyage without: a well-cushioned bottle (or travel atomiser) of Penhaligon&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia Eau de Toilette</strong>.</a><br /> <br /> While some fragrances in Penhaligon&rsquo;s repertoire have a flair for ostentation, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia </strong></a>has that delicately demure quality about it that makes it all the more irresistible. Its petal-perfect essence lingers for hours, showcasing a romantic cocktail of heart notes that never&nbsp;fade.<br /> <br /> One particularly dreary Sunday &ndash; before the climactic return of <em>Poldark </em>and the resplendent rise of <em>Victoria</em> &ndash; I happened to find myself wandering around London, with my thoughts several thousand kilometres away. I was basking on a sunbathed island where birds of paradise are not the only flowers that reign. As I passed by Penhaligon&rsquo;s in Burlington Arcade, I stumbled out of my reverie and into my favourite boutique. The tiniest ray of sunshine appeared, projecting a fortuitous spotlight on a bottle of unmatched elegance. Unable to make out the name, I tiptoed towards it, sneaking past bottles of Vaara and Artemisia.<br /> <br /> &lsquo;I thought you would be the sort of young lady who would ultimately go for Gardenia&rsquo;, said a petite woman, whose eyes sparkled like sapphires and whose intuition rivalled Mr Ollivander&rsquo;s. &lsquo;Well, I tend to follow my nose&rsquo;, I confessed.<br /> <br /> &lsquo;Your taste is indeed impeccable&rsquo;, my companion continued. &lsquo;You must be well-versed in Austen and an admirer of pink champagne truffles topped with sugared violets. Your consumption of tea must be considerable&rsquo;.<br /> <br /> Such an accurate conclusion steered me away from the path of vacillation, and I found myself leaving Burlington Arcade with my weathered umbrella dangling from one arm and a bottle of exquisitely packaged <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> from the other.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Wherever in the world you may find yourself, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> extends this humble promise: to drench you in a glamourous glow that is reminiscent of the silver screen. Its wistful overlays of jasmine, violet, rose, hyacinth, musk and vanilla make for a sumptuous bouquet with just the right sprinkling of spice. A single spritz has the potential to transport you to the place where you truly belong &ndash; whether it&rsquo;s in Fragonard&rsquo;s <em>The Swing </em>in The Wallace Collection, marooned on Bora Bora or on the set of a period drama.<br /> <br /> Relaunched in 2009, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/gardenia-eau-de-toilette/"><strong>Gardenia</strong></a> is a timeless classic that, like a strand of pearls, is certain to give you the aura of confidence and effortless grace that is perfect for any and every occasion.</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Christmas Tipple http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-drinks/#comments Fri, 11 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/christmas-drinks/ Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that). Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that).<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_448.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Christmas is the time for families, children and eggnog. This very special time of year has been celebrated with delicious drinks since Dickens was a lad (and well before that). In this series of blogs, we will look at a few of these drinks, some we know and love and some we don&rsquo;t but we may come to love. We will also find out who drank them and when. I will also include a little recipe for each one in case you fancy recreating any over the festive period.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Medieval and Tudor Christmases for the top level of society were long drawn out affairs and very different to our current version. The run up to Christmas Day or Advent was not filled with office parties and &lsquo;urban family&rsquo; get-togethers. It was a time of fasting and abstemiousness. Advent was 24 days of preparation for the body and soul &ndash; a pre-binge detox to cope with the excesses of the 12 days of Yuletide. &nbsp;Yule foods were rich and meaty &ndash; beef, venison and goose were enjoyed. The rich wouldn&rsquo;t eat the offal, also known as umbles at this time, so they would give this away to their servants. These umbles were then fashioned into some sort of pie - umble pie!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Beer was the main drink of this period but there were plenty of other historical Christmas drinks some of which were revived during Victorian and Edwardian times. Toddies, wassail, posset, wine, especially mulled wine and punch were all traditional and highly alcoholic. If you were feeling incredibly brave, you could play a game of Snap Dragon. Snap Dragon involved a bowl of brandy in which sultanas had been soaked. So far, so good! However, the mixture was heated and then set alight so that the bowl became a cauldron of burning alcohol. The game was to remove the flaming sultanas from the scalding brandy. Whoever collected the highest number of sultanas would be the winner. Please do not try this at home!&nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Christmas With The Penhaligon's Portraits Family http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/#comments Tues, 08 Nov 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/christmas-with-the-penhaligons-portraits-family/ Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots.. Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots..<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_435.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Christmas was a dim and distant memory for the rather nostalgic early Victorians. The celebration of Christmas had been steadily declining since Oliver Cromwell frowned on its pagan roots..&nbsp;<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The usual Christmas celebrations and traditions were being lost and it was time for someone to do something about it. &nbsp;Enter a small army of sentimentalists with Prince Albert as Commander in Chief and Charles Dickens as its General. Their aim was to breathe onto the dying embers of the yule log, rekindling the Christmas spirit. This was in the hope of bringing the post Industrial diaspora back into the bosom of the family and keeping the tradition alive. Charles Dickens showed us that Christmas was a time of showing goodwill and being amongst family. Festive food, drinks, decorations, gift giving and parlour games were all essential elements that were restored and revived. The Dickensian Christmas had been invented and yuletide was saved for future generations.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This year, we are spending Christmas with the Portraits family on their country estate. Lord George, Lady Blanche, Duchesse Rose and her husband, Duke Nelson are joined by family and friends. This is a new age, the Belle Epoque, where Victorian values seemed to have been dropped like a hot chestnut. Impropriety could be ignored as long as there was discretion. If you appeared moral and righteous, it is possible that you could get up to all sorts of mischief &ndash; even at a family Christmas!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> After the formalities and ceremonies of Christmas had been followed to the letter, from going to church to the gift giving and Christmas Dinner, the family and their friends are now settling down for an evening of parlour games.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This is where the fun starts in more ways than one. There are many parlour games to choose from, some have been with us for thousands of years and some are new inventions to add a little variety and fun to the proceedings.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> As the evening unfurls, the masks of respectability start to slip, fuses get shorter and morals loosen!&nbsp; Who will see through Blind Man&rsquo;s Buff? Who will enjoy the irony of playing Charades? By the end of the night, will anyone have to pay a real forfeit? In a time where manners were the embodiment of class, will we see anyone disgrace themselves or worse?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> To follow is a series of blogs that will feature some of the most popular games of the times. Each of the four blogs will be dedicated to each member of the Portrait&rsquo;s family. Let the fun begin!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> 0 Little Known London – St James and Mayfair http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/#comments Mon, 31 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/little-known-london-st-james-and-mayfair/ To get you into the spirit of Hallowe’en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk. To get you into the spirit of Hallowe’en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_431.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> To get you into the spirit of Hallowe&rsquo;en, why not go ghost hunting in Mayfair and around the alleyways of the old palace quarter? To get you in the mood for seeking out ghouls, why not start by visiting Green Park at dusk. Enter via the narrow passageway by the rear entrance of the Stafford Hotel. Green Park may look pretty in the day but it is notorious for tales of murder, illegal duelling and even an assassination attempt on Queen Victoria; it is a dark place in both meanings of the word. There are rumours of a leper burial ground and a plague pit but also a haunted Plane tree where no bird or squirrel will play and around which no flowers will grow. &nbsp;As a Hallowe&rsquo;en treat why not go in search of this &ldquo;Tree of Death&rdquo;. No one will admit to its exact location, so please feel free to claim one that looks appropriately scary. When you have chosen your tree, it might be fun to see if any of the stories are true!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> If you are feeling brave enough, sit by your nominated tree, settle a moment and then listen. Imagine you can you discern rhythmic breathing coming from deep within the trunk. Concentrate and you could start to hear a low and sinister laugh, a laugh that builds into something truly horrendous and hideous. No one knows why these sounds emanate from the tree but once heard, they are enough to make the hairs on your neck stand up. Your first instinct is to get up and run away as fast as possible but if you can hold your ground long enough, take time to look up. Within the branches you may be able to make out the figure of a man. He is climbing the tree, carrying a coil of rope. The rope is then tied carefully around a large branch way up in the tree and then he places a noose around his neck.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Close your eyes as you imagine him jumping; there is no noise apart from the tree creaking and an occasional twig breaking. Then there is complete silence and as you open your eyes again, there is no one there. Many a young couple who have used the cover of the tree for a romantic moment before being unnerved or frightened off by the noises originating from deep within the trunk. Could this tree have been the site of a man ending his own life or maybe there is a worried father following his daughter when she is out on a first date?!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> 50 Berkeley Square, is home to a weird yet compelling monster/ghost. There have been so many tales of this sinister creature that it became known as the Beast of Berkeley Square. It started becoming the talk of the town in the 1840&rsquo;s when a brave but intoxicated 20 year-old aristocrat took a wager to stay in the house&rsquo;s most notorious room for a night. He persuaded the landlord to let him in late one evening. Begrudgingly, the landlord allowed him to stay in the room on the top floor but insisted that he take a gun and a bell into the room to be used in case of an emergency. Within a few minutes, the bell was ringing furiously. The landlord ran up the stairs to the room to find a smoking gun on the floor beside the body of the young gentleman. He had backed himself into a corner and had taken a shot at the intruder but there was no trace of the bullet. There were no marks or signs of a struggle; it was as if the man had died of shock. His face was contorted into an expression of abject fear and his wide eyes were nearly out of their sockets as if he had witnessed something unthinkably foul and grotesque.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The top floor room has allegedly been locked ever since until one night in 1943&hellip;.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Even the royal family is not exempt. St James&rsquo;s and Buckingham Palaces are both rumoured to be haunted, in fact, St James Palace&rsquo;s seems to have a particularly nasty royal wraith.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The ghost story involves the Duke of Cumberland, uncle to the future Queen Victoria and his valet, Joseph Sellis. In 1810 the Duke had been attacked in his own bed sustaining cuts to his hands and thigh. The Duke&rsquo;s valet, who slept in the adjacent room, had seemingly slept through the whole debacle. The Duke called for the doctor and sent for his valet to attend to him. The valet was found in his bed, lying in a pool of his own of blood. He had been murdered. The subsequent inquest returned the surprising verdict of suicide. The reason cited was that he must have attacked the Duke in a fit of pique and had then decided to take his own life. Even a layman would know that this was unlikely as there seemed to be no motive for the attack and his injuries were so severe that they could not have been self-inflicted. Many believed the Duke responsible for his death, covering up the murder by pretending there had been an attempt on his own life. It seems that Sellis&rsquo;s ghost has been trying to wreak revenge ever since. Maybe he wanted to scare the Duke or even to tell the world of this wrong decision. He is sometimes seen wandering the halls as a bloodstained apparition. Others have the sense that they are being watched even though there is no one in the room; this is often accompanied by the foul and metallic scent of blood. If you wander the alleyways or corridors around the palace, you may catch a glimpse of him or even detect the awful aroma that follows in his wake.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Windsors leave Buckingham Palace in December to spend Christmas at their estate in Sandringham, Norfolk. This has been a tradition for many years but maybe there is another reason for wishing to leave at this time. The 25<sup>th</sup> December is the favoured date of a ghostly manifestation of a monk dressed in a black cowl. There have been many sightings and even a photograph or two of this uninvited guest. The land Buckingham Palace is built on once belonged to the monastery of Westminster Abbey, which may give it some credibility but it does make you wonder if Her Majesty should ensure that her sherry is well and truly locked away at this time!&nbsp;<br /> 0 Pretty City London x Penhaligon's http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/prettycitylondon/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/prettycitylondon/#comments Fri, 28 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT PrettyCityLonon /blog/prettycitylondon/ I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore. I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_434.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">I have been an admirer of Penhaligon&rsquo;s forever, first noticing its beautiful boutique perfumeries when working near Covent Garden. Walking past most days on my way to lunch it was hard not to notice the rich aromas spilling out on to the street. So I was thrilled when invited to a perfume profiling session earlier in the month. I mean any offer to spend a morning in one of their beautiful stores is not one I would ever chose to ignore.<br /> <br /> Off I pottered to their Burlington Arcade store in the heart of Mayfair. Entering the shop is like stepping back to an age of Victorian decadence and aromatic indulgence. Lead upstairs to the opulent profiling room and sitting down to tea and to chat all things perfume and ooh me.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5257_copy.jpg" /></span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5246_copy.jpg" /></span></div> <br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The passionate and expert consultant worked effortlessly for the forty-five minute session to identify my personality profile: my dislikes, favourite textiles, food, all in an effort to decipher the fragrance most suited to me. Using her expertise she narrowed down the choice to four or five stopping to give me the interesting history to each one. This is where I fall hard I love the stories behind all the scents, its Penhaligons rich history that sets it apart. Founded in 1892 by the eccentric William Penhaligon, a Cornish Barber who later moved to London and became perfumer to Queen Victoria. With a history since 1800&rsquo;s and a Royal seal of approval, Penhaligons is a true luxury. It turned out Luna was the scent for me, it celebrates a Mythical Love Story. Its fresh and floral notes are the perfect combination. Now that I have found it I can&rsquo;t imagine ever changing.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img src="/images/blogs/C38A5252_copy.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;</span></div> <span style="font-size: 16px;">I loved the whole experience so much I asked if I could somehow give one of my followers the chance to experience it too so I am thrilled to say we are partnering to offer one of @prettycitylondon followers a chance to win a profiling session and take along a guest. All you have to do is share your images of London to #portraitsoflondon all next week and we will chose a lucky winner on Sunday November 6th. Good luck all!</span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> <u><strong><a href="https://www.instagram.com/prettycitylondon/?hl=en /">@prettycitylondon on Instagram </a></strong></u> 0 A Day In London With The Duke http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/#comments Weds, 26 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Elena /blog/a-day-in-london-with-the-duke/ The Duke starts his day with a breakfast... The Duke starts his day with a breakfast...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_433.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Just wanted to share with you some images I took for Penhaligon&#39;s character The Duke, who is part of newly launched&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Portrait&#39;s collection</a>.&nbsp;</span></span></div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">The Duke starts his day with a breakfast in&nbsp;</span></span><a href="http://www.ridinghousecafe.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank"><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">the Riding House Cafe.</span></span></a></div> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <a href="http://www.ridinghousecafe.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank"><br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE1(2).jpg" style="width: 473px; height: 314px;" /></a><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE2(1).jpg" style="width: 468px; height: 312px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE3(1).jpg" style="width: 471px; height: 314px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</p> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">Filling refueled, he is ready to hit the stores. He decides to go to&nbsp;<a href="http://www.libertylondon.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Liberty</a>&nbsp;first to check their new textiles and rug collections.</span></div> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE4(1).jpg" style="width: 471px; height: 314px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE5(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE6(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE7(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></p> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Doing shopping is so tiring! He feels that he needs a break. The Duke stops at&nbsp;<a href="http://said.it/en/london" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Said</a>&nbsp;for a cup of their amazing hot chocolate.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE9(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now he is ready to continue. Being a huge art admirer he goes to check out newly opened exhibition at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.tate.org.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Tate Britain</a>, one of his favourite museums.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE10(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now time to visit his tailors and shoemakers on Jermyn Street.</span></span><br /> <br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE11(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/DUKE12(1).jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 328px;" /></div> <div style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</div> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">All the alterations are done and he is almost ready for the evening. On the way to dinner he pops into&nbsp;<a href="http://www.hatchards.co.uk/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Hatchard&#39;s</a>, London&#39;s oldest bookshop, to get some more books about art as he is getting ready to attend an auction in a few days.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <img alt="" src="/images/DUKE13.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Now the business in done and it&#39;s time to relax. He has dinner at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.bentleys.org/" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);" target="_blank">Bentley&#39;s Oyster Bar &amp; Grill.</a></span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/JM4A7400.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/JM4A7412.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <br /> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">As evening is coming to London he crosses Picadilly and heads to see the latest play at the theatre.</span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px; text-align: center;"> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/DUKE14.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">*In collaboration with Penhaligon&#39;s London.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(102, 102, 102); line-height: 1.6em; font-family: proxima-nova; font-size: 14px;"> <span style="font-family:arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Read more from Elena on: <a href="http://www.elensham.com/">http://www.elensham.com/</a></span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> &nbsp;</p> 0 Little Known London – The East End at Hallowe’en http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/#comments Tues, 25 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/little-known-london-the-east-end-at-halloween/ The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. <br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_430.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">The great thing about ghosts is that they seem to loiter in the most interesting places. A walk around the East End will reveal not only some truly terrifying tales of ghostly encounters but also some secret sites where you can really scare yourself.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The East End starts immediately where the City of London ends. This was clearly marked by the long since gone city walls. It seems to be the place that attracted some very nasty occurrences. Just outside the city limits by the Andaz hotel, there is a navy plaque dedicated to the Priory of St Mary of Bethlehem. This is a reminder of the former asylum that was founded here in 1247. This asylum is more commonly known as Bedlam. The site of the hospital was on the land now managed by Network Rail and forms part of Liverpool Street station. Since the nineteenth century, there have been reports of phantom screams in the area and within the station itself. These have been attributed to a former patient of Bedlam called Rebecca Griffiths. According to local legend, Rebecca liked to play with an old penny, in fact, she was never without it in her hands. However, when she died, the coin was prised from her fingers and she was buried without it. Were these protest screams for the return of her penny or just the sounds of general madness in this very busy part of town? Who really knows!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Central line also seems to have been haunted by a lady in white. Again, could this be Rebecca? If you are feeling brave, why don&rsquo;t you stand near the mouth of the Eastbound Central line and stare into the darkness? You may be able to see a young woman wearing a white nightgown, searching for her old penny in the shadows of the tunnel.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Still at the edge of the City, there is a church called St Botolph without Bishopsgate. Walk into the church on a busy weekday, close the door and you will leave the noise and mayhem of the city behind you. This attractive church has become quite famous for a ghostly photograph taken back in the 1980&rsquo;s. The photographer seemed to have inadvertently taken a snap of a spectre. It was not until he was developing the film in his dark room that he saw a figure on the balcony in one of his photographs. He looked closer and saw that this figure came in full medieval costume and a jaunty hat. Although you could put this down to double exposure or a trick of the light, it was a strange coincidence a few years later that made him think that he had captured a spirit on celluloid. By chance, a builder who had been working in the crypt of the church loosened some bricks causing them to fall onto the top of a crypt. The crypt lid was badly damaged and needed repair. When the builder looked inside the damaged coffin, he saw a well-preserved body. This body bore an uncanny resemblance to the image he had seen in the now-infamous photograph. Take your camera at your peril!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Jack the Ripper has been the subject of many a local ghost story. There are some fabulous atmospheric alleyways that were possibly rat runs for the murderer as he escaped from his heinous crimes. Nip down the skinny Catherine Wheel Alley and hope that you do not meet anyone coming the opposite way and walk over to Artillery Passage. This is an atmospheric reminder of the cramped conditions of the East End. Spook yourself by walking down Parliament court and just hope that you do not feel the hot breath of a ghostly Jack who still scares people along such streets.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The beautiful Fournier, Princelet and Wilkes Streets are the legacy of the French Huguenots who were living here from the late seventeenth century. It is amazing to think how the stunning town houses survived two world wars as well as the city developers of the 1970s. These houses would have seen some interesting and sometimes terrifying activities relating to the most famous murderer in London. The Ten Bells pub at the end of Fournier Street seems to be chocker block with ghosts that you wonder how the punters fit in. Two of the victims of Jack the Ripper were drinking here on the nights they were murdered and it seems likely that Jack himself would have popped in for a beer or two.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> For many years, there was accommodation upstairs used by the bar staff. One of the bedrooms was known as &ldquo;Jack&rsquo;s room&rdquo;. It was rented out on a regular basis &ndash; sometimes it seems that the bed was hardly slept in before the tenant had fled wide-eyed and terrified. The ghost of Jack&rsquo;s room seems to prey mostly on women. Some claim to have woken up to find a man in bed with them with his arm around them. Understandably, this was a little alarming and as they screamed and turned on the light to see their unwanted bed partner, they are more shocked when they discover they are actually alone. Is this amorous wraith the ghost of Jack The Ripper or do these women all have the same bad dream?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> There is plenty to see in the East End and many of opportunities to scare yourself &ndash; a quick look in an estate agent&rsquo;s window should do the trick but if you fancy something a little darker, head to Spital Square and stand on the site of the Spitalfields&rsquo; Charnel house. Simply put, this was a bone deposit for medieval bones. The area was also a burial site for the Romans. Sit on one of the nearby benches in the dead of night and wait. Will you be able to hear the menacing, marching feet of a Roman garrison returning from <strong>Camulodunum</strong> or will you become aware of the rush of Boudicca&rsquo;s chariots heading to the City to raze it to the ground?&nbsp;</span><br /> 0 A Day In London With Duchess Rose http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/#comments Mon, 24 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Monalogue /blog/a-day-in-london-with-duchess-rose/ “Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in the society wedding of the year – some say to escape the rigour of her parents’ watchful eye. “Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in the society wedding of the year – some say to escape the rigour of her parents’ watchful eye.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_432.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> In Spring this year, I headed to Penhaligon&rsquo;s, Covent Garden for a glass of prosecco and a fragrance profiling session. In summer, I spent an afternoon in Greenwich Observatory celebrating the launch of Penhaligon&rsquo;s new fragrance, Luna. Now that Autumn is here, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have given me a new cause for celebration. The Portraits collection.<br /> <br /> <em>Portraits</em>&nbsp;showcases the English spirit. Each fragrance is a member of the family. Each family member has a story to tell. Today we are having a day out in London in&nbsp;spirit of the Duchess Rose.<br /> <br /> <em>&ldquo;Daughter of Lord George and Lady Blanche (and heir to all their fortune) the now Duchess Rose married Duke Nelson in&nbsp;the society wedding of the year &ndash; some say to escape&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 1.5;">the rigour of her parents&rsquo; watchful eye. You will&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">immediately sense the purity and pedigree of the&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">English rose &ndash; its petals still green, fresh and youthful&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 1.5;">&ndash; but as your acquaintance with her grows, there is much more to be discovered. An unexpected sensuality. A mandarin zest for life &ndash; brimming with juiciness and oriental vigour, and relaxing to a self- assured, confident and explosively sexy chypre. She is a mischievous fox &ndash; clever and capable of deceit whilst always pursuing opportunity. This pampered heiress has hidden depths and she intends to surprise&hellip;&rdquo;</span></em><br /> <br /> <span style="line-height: 1.5;">Well I say.</span><br /> <br /> <h2> We begin with tea&hellip;</h2> <span style="line-height: 1.5;"><img alt="Peggy Porschen London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1969 size-large" height="772" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5604.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" width="579" /></span><br /> <br /> A grand day out wouldn&rsquo;t be possible without adequate fuel. It is a necessity, therefore, for the day to begin with a spot of tea and a slice of cake (or two). Peggy Porschen, Belgravia is an ideal starting point for Duchess Rose. The entrance is adorned with a garland of roses. In the parlour, you&rsquo;ll find a selection of luxurious indulgences. Don&rsquo;t forget the champagne.<br /> <br /> <h2> Columbia Road Flower Market</h2> <img alt="RHS Chelsea Flower Show London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1569 size-large" height="772" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/img_9771.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" width="579" /><br /> <br /> On a Sunday morning, Columbia road is completely transformed with rows upon rows of delicate&nbsp;blooms. With a name like&nbsp;Duchess Rose, it would be rude not to.<br /> <br /> <h2> A stroll around Notting Hill</h2> <img alt="Notting Hill London" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-918" height="491" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3608.jpeg?resize=1147%2C1147" width="491" /><br /> <br /> After the flower market, it&rsquo;s time for a leisurely stroll around Notting Hill. From colourful terraces to charming mews, Notting Hill is a place of inspiration. If the business of the district grows too much, escape to Kensington Gardens.<br /> <br /> <h2> And look, it&rsquo;s time for tea!</h2> <img alt="Duchess Rose in London" class="aligncenter wp-image-1971 size-large" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_4377-e1475522310978-768x1024.jpg?resize=768%2C1024" style="width: 478px; height: 600px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3609.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i1.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3606.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Notting Hill London" src="http://i2.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/img_3611.jpeg?resize=450%2C450" /><br /> <br /> After so much exploring, it&rsquo;s time to replenish lost energy. Fear not, because Biscuiteers isn&rsquo;t far afield. Whether it&rsquo;s an&nbsp;edible London townhouse or an iced Beatrix Potter character, you&rsquo;re bound to find a snack that will captivate your imagination and satisfy your sugar cravings. Just in case a latte and biscuit aren&rsquo;t enough, there is also a&nbsp;high tea.<br /> <br /> <h2> Time to let your hair down&hellip;</h2> <img alt="http://i0.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5605.jpg" class="shrinkToFit" src="http://i0.wp.com/www.monalogue.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/IMG_5605.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 600px;" /><br /> <br /> <p> As the day draws to a close, we mustn&rsquo;t forget that Duchess Rose has a wild side that her family have yet to discover. A glass of ros&eacute; in The Churchill Arms seems an appropriate way to indulge it.</p> <p> Where will the evening take you?</p> <p> Thank you Penhaligon&#39;s for this memorable agenda. Browse the&nbsp;Portraits collection&nbsp;and&nbsp;become <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/">better acquainted with the characters here</a>.<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>Read more from Lifestyle Blogger &amp; Photographer Mona on: <a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/">http://www.monalogue.co.uk/</a></strong></p> 0 The Coveted Duchess Rose http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/#comments Mon, 24 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen /blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose/ A fresh, sweet Rose — ready for the picking. Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire. A fresh, sweet Rose — ready for the picking. Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_418.jpg"<br/><br/><h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The Coveted Duchess Rose</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A fresh, sweet Rose &mdash; ready for the picking.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Ever since her recent marriage (anything but a bed of roses) our demure Duchess is urgently desirous of desire.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her bosom is aching for release from the corsets of Victorian life, she dreams of nothing but Paradise Regained, again and again.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When one&rsquo;s husband is at the theatre every evening, one does become terribly bored&hellip;.</span></span></div> <div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Oh heavenly joy!</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">As pure as the first rain. As crisp and sparkling as a chilled Ros&eacute;.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The sweetest rose whose fresh innocence, and general constitution is without compare.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">But by golly&hellip; quelle surprise&hellip; these corporeal, woody notes seem to reveal indiscreetly something else. </span></span><span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Something that French women might wear. At night. In the dark.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When delicacy takes on an Epicurean allure.</span></span></div> </div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Lady Blanche: The Cocktail http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/#comments Thurs, 20 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/lady-blanche-summerset-cocktail/ A subtle yet beautifully blended botanical cocktail... A subtle yet beautifully blended botanical cocktail...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_421.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 16px;"><strong>The Lady Blanche (Summerset)</strong><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 40 ml Bloom gin<br /> 20 ml lavender syrup<br /> 15 ml lemon juice<br /> 2 dashes orange bitters<br /> 40 ml Fentiman&rsquo;s tonic/light tonic top<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Method: Build and stir gently<br /> Glass: Bloom balloon small<br /> Garnish: lavender sprig</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 An Olfactory Fiction: A day in London with Lord George http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/#comments Tues, 18 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Olga Chagunava /blog/an-olfactory-fiction-a-day-in-london-with-lord-george/ What we imagine a day in the life of Lord George to be... What we imagine a day in the life of Lord George to be...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_427.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Lord George starts his day early in the morning in his beautiful Georgian mansion, which is situated within the heart of Richmond Park. After a cup of English Breakfast tea he takes his dog for a walk in the park.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_6198.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;">&nbsp;<img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_6185.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Later in the morning Lord George meets his business partner for breakfast at Corner Room in Townhall Hotel.&nbsp;After breakfast Lord heads to the City of London, where he has a few important meetings.<br /> &nbsp;</span> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_9210(1).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" /></span><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_8393.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">In the afternoon Lord George has an appointment with the tailor in Saville Row. He picks up his tailor-made black tie for the Royal event.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_8187.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">To complete a busy day Lord George heads to Bourdon House, a Private Member&#39;s Club, where he and his colleagues enjoy whiskey and cigars, while waiting for dinner...</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/IMG_8189.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /></span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_7595.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 625px;" /><br /> <br /> Olga is a Travel and Lifestyle blogger based in London. Find out more on: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/liolaliola/">https://www.instagram.com/liolaliola/</a></div> 0 National Champagne Week http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-champagne-week/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/national-champagne-week/#comments Fri, 07 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/national-champagne-week/ The UK has long been Champagne’s leading export market, in fact, holding the number one slot for almost every year since the end of the Second World War, believe it or not. The UK has long been Champagne’s leading export market, in fact, holding the number one slot for almost every year since the end of the Second World War, believe it or not.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_423.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">With this in mind, National Champagne Week 2016, founded by <a href="http://searcys.co.uk/">Searcys</a>, aims to celebrate the rich diversity of Champagne across some of the UK&rsquo;s most iconic venues through a week-long celebration of accessible and approachable experiences for everyone to enjoy. &nbsp;Check out National Champagne Week&rsquo;s <a href="https://twitter.com/champagne_week">Twitter</a> &amp; <a href="https://www.instagram.com/champagne_week/">Instagram</a> to keep up with the latest.<br /> <br /> <strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s Favourite Champagne Houses:</strong><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.bobbobricard.com/">Bob Bob Richard</a><br /> <br /> Equipped with a &ldquo;press for champagne&rdquo; button on every table, Bob Bob Richard is famous for pouring more champagne than any other restaurant in the United Kingdom.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/bobbobricard-wine-01.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <div style="text-align: right;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Image: <a href="http://www.bobbobricard.com/">Bob Bob Ricard.</a></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><a href="https://www.bubbledogs.co.uk/">Bubbledogs</a><br /> <br /> Bubbledogs is a champagne house that does not serve caviar. Instead Hot Dogs and Champagne. It sounds like an odd juxtaposition but to us it&rsquo;s a match made in heaven. Bubbledogs offers a menu of 14 hot dogs&nbsp;and some of the world&#39;s greatest grower Champagnes.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://searcysstpancras.co.uk/champagne-bar/">Searcys St Pancras Champagne Bar</a><br /> <br /> Putting some glamour back into railway travel, the 96m champagne bar at St Pancras station is touted as the longest champagne bar in Europe but in winter months it could also be known as the coldest champagne bar, thanks to its large open entrances. But a glass of bubbly is a much better send off than a Big Mac and Coke. And the design of the bar, heated banquette seating and superb view of St Pancras&#39;s vaunted ceiling and passers-by make it a keeper even in the colder months.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.champagneplusfromage.co.uk/">Champagne &amp; Fromage</a><br /> <br /> France has some of the best exports we couldn&rsquo;t live without. Good smelly cheese and champagne. Champagne + Fromage have married these two delights and created a shop and bistro that&#39;s entirely cheese and wine. Their focal point is their champagne which has won over 25 awards. Clueless bubbly lovers are given a chance to learn their way around the treasured grape with a monthly champagne tasting session. Enjoy their sixteen different champagnes and take part in the champagne afternoon tea which adds fizz to a British tradition.<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 THE BUTLER IN CONVERSATION WITH DAPHNE BUGEY http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/#comments Fri, 07 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin /blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-daphne-bugey/ How Daphne Bugey started out in the perfume industry... How Daphne Bugey started out in the perfume industry...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_409.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: How did you start out in the</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Perfume industry?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I studied perfumery at ISIPCA,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the perfumery school located</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">in Versailles, France and was</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">trained by Firmenich during</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the internship program. I learnt</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">a lot from different Perfumers</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">about the technical side of</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">my craft as well as on raw</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">materials before I joined the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Fine Fragrance team in Paris.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What drew you to the world</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>of fragrance at such a young</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>age? We read that you knew</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>you wanted to become a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>perfumer at age 10.</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I knew from the age of</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">10 that I was destined to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">become a perfumer as I was</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">passionate about everything</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">that constitutes the world</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">of fragrance. Always on the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">lookout for scents, I collected</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">bottles and advertisements.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Describe your style. Is your</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>personality reflected in the</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fragrances you create?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: Like an actress who embraces</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">the character she is playing, I</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">adapt to each subject I work</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">for. I enter the brand universe</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">that I will translate into scents</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">with my own sensibility, my</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">own perception, experience</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">and intuition. Once I have an</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">understanding of the brand</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">and I feel the fit with the team,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">then I can impart my own</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">personality.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: How long does it take you to</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>develop a fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: It really depends on the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">project. Developing a new</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">fragrance takes me between</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">one week and four years&hellip;</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What are your favourite</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>materials and scents to</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>work with?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I have a lot of favourite</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">ingredients; from citrus to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">woods, rose (reinventing rose</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">is a never ending story!),</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">spices such as ginger, to</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">sensuous vanilla and ambrox.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: When did you first discover</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I knew Penhaligon&rsquo;s by</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">reputation as the iconic</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">British perfumer from the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Victorian era. This new project</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">is breaking the codes with a</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">totally innovative approach.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Do you have a favourite</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: I like Juniper Sling created</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">by Olivier Cresp. Choosing</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">amongst the new collection,</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">The Duke is the one.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What was it like working on a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fragrance that is based on a</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>fictional character? How did</strong></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>this inspire you?</strong></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">D: We had a lot of fun. This new</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">original concept was very</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">exciting as it was offbeat.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Characters were described</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">with many crucial details with</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">clear direction. I quickly had</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">a clear vision of my creation. I</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">imagined how to translate the</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">atmosphere.</span></div> 0 Little Known London: The Coveted Duchess Rose http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose-little-known-london/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose-little-known-london/#comments Weds, 05 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/the-coveted-duchess-rose-little-known-london/ “Release Me!” The Savoy was where Belle Epoque chic mixed with good old-fashioned fun which provided the perfect escape for Duchess Rose. Everyone in London wanted an invitation to one of their lavish soirées. “Release Me!” The Savoy was where Belle Epoque chic mixed with good old-fashioned fun which provided the perfect escape for Duchess Rose. Everyone in London wanted an invitation to one of their lavish soirées.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_411.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">&ldquo;Release Me!&rdquo; The Savoy was where Belle Epoque chic mixed with good old-fashioned fun which provided the perfect escape for Duchess Rose. Everyone in London wanted an invitation to one of their lavish soir&eacute;es.<br /> <br /> The Savoy&rsquo;s parties and balls were legendary. They were usually thrown by an American tycoon or millionaire where both staff and guests dressed themselves up to reflect the various party themes. There would be gondolas, elephants, famous singers etc. It was a wonderful distraction for Rose who was one of its greatest fans.<br /> <br /> She and her friends would talk over the Gilbert &amp; Sullivan they had just seen at the Savoy theatre and talk expectantly about the next. The productions helped feed her hopeless romantic heart. Whether it was tea or dinner, drinks or a party, the Savoy was Duchess Rose&rsquo;s spiritual home.<br /> <br /> The Savoy hotel was built on the land previously occupied by the medieval Savoy Palace. There is a small chapel at the back of the hotel which has been hidden away since the reign of Henry VII. This was completely missed by Duchess Rose; there was not a chance she would be seen walking out behind the hotel &ndash; this was where the hotel staff congregated and it was filled with undesirables. Her love was the rambling hotel, the irregular floors and the ability to drive to the front of the hotel via the only road in England where you drive on the right. The Strand was not the best area in town but the Savoy was a jewel in its midst.&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Introducing The Penhaligon's Cocktail Lounge http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/introducing-the-penhaligons-cocktail-lounge/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/introducing-the-penhaligons-cocktail-lounge/#comments Tues, 04 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/introducing-the-penhaligons-cocktail-lounge/ The Penhaligon's Cocktail Lounge is finally here... The Penhaligon's Cocktail Lounge is finally here...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_425.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">In celebration of London Cocktail week we are delighted to launch <strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/the-penhaligons-cocktail-lounge/">The Penhaligon&rsquo;s Cocktail Lounge.</a></strong><br /> All our delicious fragrance inspired cocktail recipes in one place plus we&rsquo;ve introduced a few new ones into the mix.<br /> <br /> Perhaps you would like to recreate the delicious <strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-no33-martini/">No.33 Martini </a></strong>&nbsp;or a fragrant <strong><a href="http://&#9;http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/juniper-sling-the-cocktail/">Juniper Sling</a>&nbsp;</strong>made for us by Geoff Robinson from Happiness Forgets.<br /> <br /> What&#39;s more, the wonderful folks at <a href="http://www.bloomgin.com/"><strong>Bloom Gin </strong></a>have created <strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/penhaligons-portraits/">Penhaligon&rsquo;s Portraits</a> </strong>inspired tipples too.&nbsp;A true taste of Penhaligon&rsquo;s.<br /> <br /> Enjoy!</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London: The Duke http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duke-nelson/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/duke-nelson/#comments Tues, 04 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/duke-nelson/ “Flamboyancy isn’t a sin”... Duke Nelson likes the Café Royal. It is just on the wrong side of Regent Street and right on cusp of respectability. Like him, it is on the edge ready to teeter into disrespectability. “Flamboyancy isn’t a sin”... Duke Nelson likes the Café Royal. It is just on the wrong side of Regent Street and right on cusp of respectability. Like him, it is on the edge ready to teeter into disrespectability.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_412.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">&ldquo;Flamboyancy isn&rsquo;t a sin&rdquo;... Duke Nelson likes the Caf&eacute; Royal. It is just on the wrong side of Regent Street and right on cusp of respectability. Like him, it is on the edge ready to teeter into disrespectability.<br /> <br /> The Caf&eacute; Royal has been the fashionable person&rsquo;s drinking establishment since it opened in 1865. This is where those who wanted to be seen relaxed amongst the super fashionable and the new money that everyone openly hated but everyone secretly wanted. Maybe it was the quality of their wine cellar that pushed people over the side of HMS Respectability and into debauchery. The hotel&rsquo;s European flavour and its opulence has led many a titled man to drop their guard around their ankles. The Duke loves to dine and drink here with like-minded men and the more &lsquo;artistic&rsquo; crowd. The Fin de Siecle fashion of drinking Perrier Jouet, ideally the 1874 vintage was still de rigeur, after all if it was good enough for Oscar Wilde, then it was good enough for this crowd.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Duke is a Piccadilly dandy and when he is not out and about showing off his latest suit, he is at his tailors, shirtmakers or shoemakers having them made. His measurements are kept at his tailor and his figure never changes. There is a well trodden route between Jermyn Street and Savile Row where he will often mix with the establishment as they too are getting their aristocratic uniforms made. He takes this opportunity to make the small talk necessary to still be regarded as the right sort instead of &lsquo;one of them&rsquo;! As he walks away, he is sure that they are casting aspersions on his character.<br /> After spending a day between his friends and his tailors, he will head home to freshen up and to change into suitable finery before returning to the Caf&eacute; Royal for a light degustif before dinner. He spends a little time talking to the Duchess; she is telling him about drinks at Gunters in Berkeley Square. The Duke is not listening; he is thinking about who will be at the Caf&eacute; Royal that night. &nbsp;</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 London Cocktail Week http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/london-cocktail-week/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/london-cocktail-week/#comments Mon, 03 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/london-cocktail-week/ This is ones chance to explore the city and drink up! This is ones chance to explore the city and drink up!<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_424.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Here at Penhaligon&#39;s we are quite partial to a tipple or two. With that in mind, we are delighted that London&#39;s Cocktail Week has arrived. Any excuse to explore London&#39;s finest establishments and quaff a few .<br /> <br /> Here is a list of our favourite cocktail bars, some of which are included in London Cocktail Week&#39;s <a href="https://drinkup.london/cocktailweek/bars/">list</a> of London&#39;s best bars.<br /> <br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.mapmaison.com/">MAP MAISON</a><br /> <br /> A Haggerston home from home (with rather splendid wall tiles).&nbsp;Taking inspiration from all over the world and bringing together an eclectic mix of small plates and cocktails that can be enjoyed either in the bar or in the exclusive member&rsquo;s area.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Map Maison" src="/images/categories/MAP.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 337px;" /><br /> <a href="http://thealchemist.uk.com/"><br /> The Alchemist</a><br /> <br /> A cocktail bar restaurant that celebrates molecular mixology, alchemy and craftsmanship. Drinks are served in all manner of vessels with theatre and panache with food served morning, noon and night.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.themayorofscaredycattown.com/">The Mayor of Scaredy Cat Town</a><br /> <br /> Upon arrival you are taken through a secret door to meet the Mayor of Scaredy Cat Town. This is small bar - so don&#39;t come with a large group. Festival serve includes: &lsquo;Mayor&#39;s Vodka Cranberry&rsquo; - Stolichnaya vodka, vanilla syrup, fresh lemon juice, egg white, cranberry sauce and nutmeg.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.calloohcallaybar.com/welcome/">Calooh Callay&nbsp;</a><br /> <br /> Callooh Callay has to be one of the coolest bars in London.&nbsp; Not only do you enter their exclusive back room by walking through a wardrobe but their furniture will have you sitting in a sliced-in-half bath tub which, in truth, was deceptively comfortable.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Calooh Callay" src="/images/categories/Calloh.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 337px;" /><br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.thebalconlondon.com/stjamesbar/stjamesbar.shtm">The Balcon</a><br /> <br /> The St James Bar offers an elegant meeting place for socialising or relaxing in surroundings inspired by Coco Chanel&#39;s 1920&#39;s Paris apartment.<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.happinessforgets.com/">Happiness Forgets</a><br /> <br /> The only problem with this place is the popularity. Don&#39;t bank on getting a table whatever day of the week it is. Hoxton is not short of a bar, but this place packs in punters with a lively vibe, incredible cocktails and perfect customer service. Staff go out of their way to make sure you&#39;re happy!<br /> <a href="http://experimentalcocktailclublondon.com/"><br /> Experimental Cocktail Club</a><br /> <br /> Experimental Cocktail Club is a speakeasy-style basement club hidden behind a Chinatown door. It&#39;s not the kind of place you can expect to find very easily at all: don&#39;t be suprised if you walk past the bar&#39;s unassuming battered door several times before realising it leads to this buzzing three-floor joint filled with trendy groups and dating couples absorbing lively chatter.</span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Lord George: The Cocktail http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lord-george-cocktail/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lord-george-cocktail/#comments Mon, 03 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/lord-george-cocktail/ Masculine, elegant and full of panache. Powerful, rich and ever-welcoming. Lord George: The Cocktail Masculine, elegant and full of panache. Powerful, rich and ever-welcoming. Lord George: The Cocktail<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_420.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Our friends at Bloom Gin have created a wonderful beverage in celebration of the launch of Penhaligon&#39;s Portraits. The Patriarch, Lord George, is masculine, elegant and full of panache. Powerful, rich and ever-welcoming. The cocktail follows suit. Try for yourself...<br /> <br /> <br /> <strong>Lord George: The Cocktail</strong><br /> <br /> From the bar:<br /> <br /> 40 ml Bloom gin<br /> 20 ml Monin tarte Citron (lemon pie)<br /> 15 ml lemon juice<br /> 2 dashes Grapefruit bitters<br /> 40 ml soda top<br /> <br /> <br /> Method: Build and stir gently<br /> The Finishing touch: Chocolate mocca beans&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Much Ado About The Duke http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/much-ado-about-the-duke/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/much-ado-about-the-duke/#comments Fri, 30 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen /blog/much-ado-about-the-duke/ Who could say if it was the evenings spent at the theatre that gave the Duke his ravishing, ravished air. A slight perfume of intrigue engulfs him nevertheless. Exquisitely ubiquitous, a decadent dandy, an utterly charming chap, virulently ambivalent, a thoroughly ambiguous first son-in-law — hearts throb wherever he goes, but not the ones you might think. His wife agrees that the theatre is no place for a Duchess. Sometimes she longs not to be a Duchess… Who could say if it was the evenings spent at the theatre that gave the Duke his ravishing, ravished air. A slight perfume of intrigue engulfs him nevertheless. Exquisitely ubiquitous, a decadent dandy, an utterly charming chap, virulently ambivalent, a thoroughly ambiguous first son-in-law — hearts throb wherever he goes, but not the ones you might think. His wife agrees that the theatre is no place for a Duchess. Sometimes she longs not to be a Duchess…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_417.jpg"<br/><br/><h2> <br /> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Much Ado About The Duke</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Who could say if it was the evenings spent at the theatre that gave the Duke his ravishing, ravished air.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">slight perfume of intrigue engulfs him nevertheless.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Exquisitely ubiquitous, a decadent dandy, an utterly charming chap, virulently ambivalent, a thoroughly ambiguous first son-in-law &mdash; hearts throb wherever he goes, but not the ones you might think.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His wife agrees that the theatre is no place for a Duchess.Sometimes she longs not to be a Duchess&hellip;.</span></span></div> <div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A rose is a rose is a rose.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Except when your assumptions are laid bare.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Because expectations can only disappoint.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When hot is cold and day is night. When florals are exclusively strong and invigorating.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">When leather is only soft and smooth.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">And whilst head-turning, whilst decadent, whilst painfully chic we should remember that transgression, (like progress and modernity) is as old as the hills, as classic as Greek and as universal as Man.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Enchanting Spicy Rose</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Peppery Rose - Gin - Leathery woods</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> </div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London: Lady Blanche http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/ladyblanche/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/ladyblanche/#comments Weds, 28 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/ladyblanche/ "Charmingly dangerous“ "Charmingly dangerous“<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_413.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;<br /> Lady Blanche visits London. Where will she go? What hidden gems will she find?<br /> <br /> Lady Blanche loves to take herself off towards the river where she enjoys the majesty of the river Thames. The palaces and Westminster are left behind as she ventures west towards Chelsea. The Royal borough is home to beautiful bridges and green spaces which enjoys before she arrives at her favourite place in London, The Chelsea Physic Garden.<br /> <br /> The small and genteel streets around the Kings&rsquo; Road are quainter and smaller than Mayfair but the white stucco creates a lighter feel. History is all around you as you pass The Royal Hospital, with its Chelsea Pensioners walking around as a throwback to Restoration England and the coronation of King Charles II. The river Thames tells a story and reveals a working life of breweries, porcelain manufacturing and even baking. The Chelsea bun was baked in the area and the only hint of its existence is in the street named Bunhouse Place. Chelsea is like this; there is no uninterrupted gentility but a mix of working homes and the stately and beautiful houses so brilliantly summed up by historian and writer, Thomas Carlyle, who in 1834 described Chelsea as &ldquo;a singular heterogeneous kind of spot, very dirty and confused in some places, quite beautiful in others, abounding in antiquities and traces of great men&rdquo;.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> On Swan Walk, through a small doorway, magic happens. The Chelsea Physic Garden is so well hidden that you would not even guess it was there. It is surrounded by a wall which doesn&rsquo;t give much away. This beautiful garden enjoys a clement climate allowing a wide variety of plants to be grown here. Leased to the Worshipful Society of Apothecaries, this is where Lady Blanche&rsquo;s real interest lies. She is often seen walking through the garden and enjoying the colours and fragrances of the flowers but more and more, she is seen poring over the recipes for the medicines and antidotes that if administered incorrectly will cause enormous harm and even death. She is careful not to be seen to be writing anything down!</span><br /> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 The Revenge of Lady Blanche http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-revenge-of-lady-blanche/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-revenge-of-lady-blanche/#comments Mon, 26 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen /blog/the-revenge-of-lady-blanche/ Lady Blanche is a picture of devotion, charm — and criminal intentions. A social butterfly with a dangerous bite one might say. Shakespeare did try to warn us “ hell hath no fury like a woman scorned ”. Indeed, a woman does always know. Lady Blanche wishes, oh how she wishes! that she did not. The real crime you see is the inelegance of not having kept all of this where it belongs — in the dark, with the lights off! (Cross her at your peril.) Lady Blanche is a picture of devotion, charm — and criminal intentions. A social butterfly with a dangerous bite one might say. Shakespeare did try to warn us “ hell hath no fury like a woman scorned ”. Indeed, a woman does always know. Lady Blanche wishes, oh how she wishes! that she did not. The real crime you see is the inelegance of not having kept all of this where it belongs — in the dark, with the lights off! (Cross her at your peril.)<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_416.jpg"<br/><br/><h2 style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</h2> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The Revenge of Lady Blanche</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Lady Blanche is a picture of devotion, charm &mdash; and criminal intentions.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A social butterfly with a dangerous bite one might say.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Shakespeare did try to warn us &ldquo; hell hath no fury like a woman scorned&rdquo;.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Indeed, a woman does always know. Lady Blanche wishes, oh how she wishes! that she did not.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The real crime you see is the inelegance of not having kept all of this where it belongs &mdash; in the dark, with the lights off! (Cross her at your peril.)</span></span></div> <div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Her Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">For those in-the-know.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">A fragrance that announces only its discretion but that makes you sit up and take note.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Noble ingredients, a tour de force of control, exquisite good taste. Sagacity.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Wit. And just as you are lulled by life&rsquo;s felicity into your afternoon-tea gentle reverie &mdash; it reminds you that there is a certain finesse &mdash; that only people Of Character can master. </span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Modestly uplifting. Timelessly present.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Narcotic Green Floral</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Powdery orris - Narcissus Flower - Hyacinth </span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> </div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Little Known London: Lord George http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/#comments Fri, 16 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/littleknownlondonlordgeorge/ At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends... At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_415.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Imagine if you will, our patriarch, Lord George. Bored of roaming the grounds of his country estate, and so hot foots it to London. But where is his space? Somewhere he feels at home and understood. Perhaps he spends his days based in the conservative environs of St James&rsquo;s.<br /> <br /> James&rsquo;s Palace or the court of St James was the place where gentlemen came to be seen and mix with the royal household hoping for an important role or to make that important connection. Clubs started here to allow gentlemen to have somewhere to stay and to mix with other gentlemen. At the beginning of the new age of the 20th Century, this was still the most aristocratic area where men came to network, smoke, drink and catch up with friends.<br /> <br /> St James&rsquo;s clubs and houses are solid, respectable and reassuringly expensive. They represent the link to the past. The Tudor palace of St James&rsquo;s is now the centre of royal operations and provides apartments to the various members of the extended royal family. Its tumultuous past has luckily gone and it truly represents the establishment. As we walk along Pall Mall, the houses and clubs are closed to those who are not in the know and in the right power circles. You will never spy someone out of place in this area. The back of the houses, the mews, the courts are where the servants and the tradesmen do their work and they will rarely be seen in the grand backdrop of Pall Mall or St James&rsquo;s Street.<br /> <br /> <br /> For those lucky enough to be able to promenade in the area, look up. Every house is a variation on another. Note the size and grandeur of the windows at a time when making glass on this scale was prohibitively expensive and see the doorways, wide enough for even the most well-fed aristo to pass through comfortably. The snuffers for torches, the metal foot scrapers and the half-moon shaped windows above the door are details that tell you of a time when lighting was poor and even the most genteel couldn&rsquo;t avoid the horses! Off the main streets, you can enjoy the garden squares providing space, greenery and relics from a bygone era.</span><br type="_moz" /> 0 The Tragedy of Lord George http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lordgeorge/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/lordgeorge/#comments Fri, 09 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Louise Rosen /blog/lordgeorge/ Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability being, of course, the key to a happy marriage. Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute. His penchant for muttering “ the flesh is weak ” over the breakfast kippers is entirely without explanation. Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability being, of course, the key to a happy marriage. Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute. His penchant for muttering “ the flesh is weak ” over the breakfast kippers is entirely without explanation.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_414.jpg"<br/><br/><h2 style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</h2> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">The Tragedy of Lord George</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Deceptively traditional, Lord George is a perfect reminder</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">that one should be aware of appearances. He himself maintains that</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">one should never be able to divine what a man is thinking. This ability</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">being, of course, the key to a happy marriage.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Honourable, to a tee, his fidelity to King and Country is resolute.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His penchant for muttering &ldquo; the flesh is weak &rdquo; over the breakfast</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">kippers is entirely without explanation.</span></span></div> <h2> <span style="font-size: 18px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">His Fragrance</span></span></h2> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Masculine and elegant &mdash; with a hint of rum.</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Powerful, rich and ever-so welcoming &mdash; &ldquo; do come in,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">I&rsquo;m sure we&rsquo;ve met before &rdquo;. For the well-to-do who are able, stable,</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">reassuring &mdash; but also lots of fun. A solid shoulder to cry on (was that a</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">protective hand I felt on my _ ?) This is a fragrance for the man whose</span></span></div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">reputation lives on.</span></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Not quite Latin &mdash; but full of love nevertheless.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Woody Ambery Fougere</span></div> <div> <span style="font-family: georgia,serif;">Brandy - Shaving Soap -Tonka bean</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> <br type="_moz" /> 0 THE BUTLER IN CONVERSATION WITH KRISTJANA WILLIAMS, http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/#comments Fri, 09 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/the-butler-in-conversation-with-kristjana-williams/ Penhaligon’s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana’s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints. Penhaligon’s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana’s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_410.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Penhaligon&rsquo;s collaborated with artist, Kristjana Williams, to create the bespoke Portraits packaging. By interweaving fragments of Victorian engravings with contemporary illustration and colouring, Kristjana Williams creates magical landscapes filled with impossible, exotic creatures. Born in Iceland, and a graduate of Central Saint Martins in London, Kristjana&rsquo;s award-winning illustration work has gained widespread critical acclaim in the realms of fashion, homewares and art prints.<br /> <br /> <strong>B: When did you know you wanted to become an artist?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: At the age of six I was constantly drawing and painting, however, when I reached my teenage years I moved away from the idea as I never dreamed I could make a career out of being an artist. Then in my midtwenties, I went back to study graphic design at Central Saint Martins, majoring in illustration. Outline Editions gallery picked up on my work and it went from there.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What inspires you/what were your earliest influences?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I think the earliest influences are the most interesting as you are not really aware of them till you look back. My childhood in Iceland is very much embedded in my work. The nature in Iceland is clearly portrayed, the starkness of the black and white treatment of the engravings looking to the frozen-over sea and black sandy beaches. My love of colour has also been influenced by Iceland, where I craved light and colour during the long, dark winters.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Describe your style.</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Modern engraver.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Can you tell us a little about your creative process: how does an idea turn into an illustration &ndash; and how long does it take?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: This varies immensely, sometimes a piece can be brewing for years then all of a sudden it comes to life over a few weeks, whereas other pieces are constantly changing and evolving and take many months to take shape. There is no perfect formula. It all starts with a lot of research and planning.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: When did you first discover Penhaligon&rsquo;s?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Many years ago in the Burlington Arcade store.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: Do you have a favourite </strong><strong>Penhaligon&rsquo;s fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I recently visited the Penhaligon&rsquo;s store inBurlington Arcade for a &lsquo;fragrance profiling&rsquo; appointment. The fragrance expert in the store asked me various questions about my tastes and lifestyle to find the Penhaligon&rsquo;s scent that would suit me the most &ndash; it was a truly wonderful experience! Juniper Sling is a favourite, due to its freshness and my love of gin! However, I couldn&rsquo;t just choose one and Halfeti is another favourite &ndash; it&rsquo;s so rich and deep, the perfect evening scent.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: The Victorian Era is a great </strong><strong>inspiration for you, is that </strong><strong>what first drew you to the </strong><strong>Portraits project?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Penhaligon&rsquo;s history alone was enough.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What inspiration did you take </strong><strong>from the characters?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: The richer the narrative the more creative I can get.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: What you&rsquo;re favourite portrait </strong><strong>character/fragrance?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: Lord George.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><strong>B: If you could be one of the </strong><strong>Portraits characters, who </strong><strong>would you be and why?</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">K: I feel a close affinity to Lord George, being the head of the family. He is also the first character I worked on for this project, so I am drawn to him as it was my first introduction into the Penhaligon&rsquo;s Portraits world.</span></div> 0 A WORD FROM THE BUTLER http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/#comments Thurs, 08 Sept 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/a-word-from-the-butler-/ No one is terribly sure when this all happened, sometimes it’s best to forget… No one is terribly sure when this all happened, sometimes it’s best to forget…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_408.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Somewhere in the rolling hills of the English countryside, nestled<br /> under a majestic canopy of oaks, the sun is gently rising over a country<br /> mansion whose foundations date back to shortly after the arrival of William<br /> the Conqueror. (Or thereabouts.)<br /> <br /> Two or three domestic servants are arduously at work drawing baths, opening curtains, lighting fires and<br /> viciously beating carpets in preparation for the first family gathering of<br /> the day.&nbsp; The happy delight of their first<br /> greeting. But is there more to this scene than meets the eye? &lsquo;Manners<br /> maketh the man&rsquo;, but are they also useful as a tool of subterfuge?<br /> What really lies behind the good manners of Britain&rsquo;s aristocracy?<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Soon it is time to find out&hellip;A VERY BRITISH AFFAIR.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 AN OLFACTORY FICTION http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-olfactory-fiction/#comments Fri, 26 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/an-olfactory-fiction/ Their presence is never far… and the perfume of scandal brightens the air. Their presence is never far… and the perfume of scandal brightens the air.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_407.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Somewhere in the rolling hills of the English countryside, nestled<br /> under a majestic canopy of oaks, the sun is gently rising over a country<br /> mansion whose foundations date back to shortly after the arrival of William<br /> the Conqueror. (Or thereabouts.)<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Coming this September to a Penhaligon&rsquo;s near you&hellip;</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5647(1).JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5642.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5658.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 667px;" /><br /> <br /> A VERY BRITISH AFFAIR.</span></div> 0 THE FLESH IS WEAK http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-flesh-is-weak/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-flesh-is-weak/#comments Weds, 24 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/the-flesh-is-weak/ "Faithful to king and country"... "Faithful to king and country"...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_406.jpg"<br/><br/><div style="text-align: center;"> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;"><strong>Coming soon to a Penhaligon&#39;s near you...</strong></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> &nbsp;</div> 0 A Summer Essential http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-summer-essential/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/a-summer-essential/#comments Tues, 23 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/a-summer-essential/ We've got summer scented and we're not the only one who agrees. Lavinia Cernau shares her love affair with Luna. We've got summer scented and we're not the only one who agrees. Lavinia Cernau shares her love affair with Luna.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_404.jpg"<br/><br/><p style="margin: 0px 0px 1em; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <br /> <span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; line-height: 15.6px;">My daily essentials this summer and the pinkest light filtering from my window at dusk. Love this time of day when the heat is shifting and the moon is boldly taking her spot in the sky.</span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/" style="color: rgb(77, 77, 77); text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Penhaligon&#39;s</a>&nbsp;newest fragrance,&nbsp;Luna, was love at first sniff. A dark woody base entwines orange bigarade oil and juniper berry to offer a fresh yet sensual crispness. Instant hypnosis for these late summer night walks in the cooled down city.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> &nbsp;</p> <p style="margin: 0px; text-align: center; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/DSCF3462.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 750px;" /></span></p> <p style="margin: 0px; color: rgb(46, 46, 46); line-height: 15.6px; letter-spacing: 0.39px; font-family: &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, Times, serif; font-size: 13px; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 250);"> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Courtesy of: <a href="http://laviniacernau.com/journal/summer-essentials">Lavinia Cernau</a></span></span></p> 0 Spencer House, London http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spencer-house/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/spencer-house/#comments Tues, 23 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/spencer-house/ This September brings incredibly exciting times for Penhaligon&#39s and it's not long now until we reveal all. We are now in the throws of final preparations and last week&nbsp;we found ourselves in the splendour of Spencer House. This September brings incredibly exciting times for Penhaligon&#39s and it's not long now until we reveal all. We are now in the throws of final preparations and last week&nbsp;we found ourselves in the splendour of Spencer House.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_395.jpg"<br/><br/>&nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Spencer House is a breathtaking&nbsp;eighteenth-century aristocratic private palace in London, overlooking Green Park.&nbsp;If you have a chance to visit we highly recommend a guided tour, available <a href="http://www.spencerhouse.co.uk/book-your-tour/">every Sunday</a>.</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>Here are some little gems we thought you&rsquo;d like&hellip;</em></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5615.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> &nbsp;<br /> <div style="text-align: justify;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The Regency chandelier made by John Blades, referred to as <em>&quot;the great glass man of Ludgate-hill&quot;</em>,</span><span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;dates back to 1815.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 16px;">The chandelier in the Dining Room is made of faceted </span><span style="font-size: 16px;">glass and gilt metal with original storm shades. It comes from the Palace of Satra, Maharashtra, India. Blades, later </span><a href="https://www.royalcollection.org.uk/collection/53130/pair-of-lustres" style="font-size: 16px;">Blades &amp; Jones</a><span style="font-size: 16px;">, were the leading manufacturers of glass chandeliers in the early nineteenth century.</span></div> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/IMG_5609.JPG" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">They produced much for the eastern market, including diplomatic gifts from George III to the Sultan of Turkey, Nizam of Hyderabad and Homerjee Bomanjee of Bombay, and this chandelier is thought to have been of the latter gift as Bombay is the capital of Maharashtra.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">The pair of giltwood pier tables in the Dining Room were designed by William Chambers (1723-1796) and made by Robert Ansell in 1773. They are veneered with alabaster tops above a fluted frieze centred with a shell flanked by swags of foliage. The V&amp;A currently showcases the giltwood pier tables, <a href="http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O8156/table-chambers-william-sir/">see here.</a><br /> <br /> The pair of pier glasses above the tables are from the late 18th century and were designed by John Yenn and made by Sefferin Alken.<br /> <br /> The frames are carved with guilloche and enclosing in the upper section a mirror plate with applied neo-classical carving centred by an urn with anthemion cresting flanked by swags of husk and drapery above scrolls of foliage. The tables and the pier glasses were made for the Grand Cabinet at Blenheim Palace. They are on loan from the Rothschild Foundation to Spencer House. </span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><em>Photos Courtesy of &nbsp;Spencer House Limited</em></span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Finding Your Signature Fragrance at Penhaligon's - Courtesy of Urban Pixxels http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/#comments Thurs, 11 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/finding-your-signature-fragrance-at-penhaligons/ Our consultation offers an authentic way of discovering a special fragrance and a true way of wearing it. Our consultation offers an authentic way of discovering a special fragrance and a true way of wearing it.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_400.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;">There&#39;s a famous study about the &#39;paradox of choice&#39; that states too many choices (in this case varieties of jam at a supermarket) will lead to decision making paralysis and unhappiness. So far I&rsquo;ve managed to buy jam without getting depressed, but when it comes to perfume, this is exactly what happens to me. There are too many options. After spraying some different fragrances&nbsp;on a piece of paper&nbsp;I don&rsquo;t know what I like and don&rsquo;t like anymore, and I walk out of the store with the same perfume I&rsquo;ve been wearing for over a decade.</span></span></span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Finding-Your-Signature-Fragrance.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></span> <div style="text-align: left;"> &nbsp;</div> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">I have always liked the idea of wearing different fragrances for different occasions, but I never really found something else that smelled and felt like &lsquo;me&rsquo;, so I&rsquo;d kind of given up.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">But then Penhaligon&rsquo;s invited me to their store in&nbsp;the Burlington Arcade for a&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); font-family: inherit; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">perfume&nbsp;profiling session</a>&nbsp;to find my signature fragrance. Someone else is going to help me find a perfume that I like? That actually sounds like a lot of fun!</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Hammam.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;" /></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">And it was. Like all the shops at the Burlington Arcade it&rsquo;s quite small inside, so I was guided to a separate, charming looking room on the first floor where we could spray all the perfumes we wanted without being interrupted. From the Hamman Bouquet, the first scent that William Penhaligon created in 1872 to the more modern ones.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: right; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Burlington-Arcade-Room.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">When I saw all the different bottles &ndash; that look beautiful by the way &ndash; I instantly&nbsp;started to feel worried. Am I going to try them all?! You&rsquo;re not, and that&rsquo;s why it&rsquo;s so great to do this with an expert. She asked me a couple of simple questions and based on my answers she knew exactly what perfume to let me try first. And I liked it. How did she do that?!</span></span></p> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Finding-Your-Signature-Fragrance-Perfume-Bottles.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 304px;" /></span></span></span></div> <div style="text-align: left;"> &nbsp;</div> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Based on my feedback she let me try a number of other perfumes that ended up on a yes, maybe or no pile.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Before doing this I don&rsquo;t think I would have been able to describe what I like or don&rsquo;t like in a fragrance. But because she told me about the different&nbsp;notes&nbsp;and the great stories behind each bottle, very quickly I knew what I was looking for.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Once we had found my favourites, it was time to try four of them on my skin. Which is so important, because the one I liked the most on paper wasn&rsquo;t my favorite anymore when I sprayed it on my pulse. And the one she gave me as a <em>&ldquo;it&rsquo;s a bit different than the others, but I think you&rsquo;ll like it&rdquo; </em>came out as the winner:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/opus-1870/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); font-family: inherit; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">Opus 1870</a>.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">It has the fragrance notes&nbsp;that I apparently like: citrus and black pepper, but it is more elegant than what I normally wear. And yet, it was still me. And since I was looking for something to compliment my loyal L&rsquo;Eau d&rsquo;Issey, I decided to go with this one.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Perfume-Bottle-Opus-1870-Hands.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px;" /></span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Who would have thought that shopping for perfume could be such a fun experience without any stress. They don&rsquo;t offer these profiling sessions in&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(232, 121, 74); text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline;" target="_blank">all their stores</a>, but if you&rsquo;re like me and are struggling to find your signature fragrance, then I can highly recommend contacting Penhaligon&rsquo;s to book&nbsp;your own session.</span></span></p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Penhaligons-London-Signature-Scent-Hands-Perfume.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 749px; text-align: center; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;" /></span></span><br /> &nbsp;</p> <p class="large-image" style="margin: 0px 0px 1.2em; padding: 0px; outline: 0px; border: 0px currentColor; border-image: none; text-align: left; color: rgb(79, 79, 79); line-height: 24.5px; letter-spacing: 1px; font-family: Lora, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 14px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="text-align: left; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif;">To book your own complimentary&nbsp;Fragrance Profiling consultation call </span><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/" style="text-align: left; font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;">your nearest Penhaligon&#39;s Store.</a></span></p> </div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Courtesy of:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.urbanpixxels.com/penhaligons/ ">Urban Pixxels</a>.</span></div> 0 Afternoon Tea Week http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/afternoon-tea-week/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/afternoon-tea-week/#comments Tues, 09 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Lucy /blog/afternoon-tea-week/ It seems the whole of the UK are rejoicing in Afternoon Tea Week. It seems the whole of the UK are rejoicing in Afternoon Tea Week.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_394.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <p style="margin: 0cm 0cm 0pt;"> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">There are few British traditions more decadent than traditional Afternoon Tea. Afternoon Tea Week gets underway from August 10th-13th, during which we pay particular homage to <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a>,&nbsp;our very first gourmand fragrance which plays with an olfactory palette inspired by the delights of high tea, accompanied by the heady bouquet of the first sweet Spring flowers. Blooming marvellous!&nbsp;</span><br /> <span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span style="color: black; font-family: Arial, sans-serif;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/">Equinox Bloom</a> boasts delicious notes of </span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif;">Chantilly, Frangipani and Brown Sugar blended with violet leaves, orange blossom absolute and jasmine sambac, rounded with the deep, Oriental richness of Benzoin Siam and Ambrox.<br /> <br /> Previously we scoured London for the finest, eclectic selection of</span></span><span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11pt;"><span style="font-size: 16px;">&nbsp;Afternoon Tea, which you can find <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-best-afternoon-teas-in-london/">here.</a><br /> <br /> It was difficult to choose but our personal favourite is <a href="https://sketch.london/#gsc.tab=0">Sketch,</a>&nbsp;a complex and unique site tucked away in Mayfair. Sketch offers a blend of eccentric Britishness and continental experimentalism.</span>&nbsp;</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-family: Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 11pt;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/sketch-afternoon-tea.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Where is your favourite Afternoon Tea location?</span></div> 0 The Penhaligon’s Fragrance Table http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/#comments Thurs, 04 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin /blog/the-penhaligons-fragrance-table/ The Inspiration Behind Penhaligon's Unique Fragrance Tables. The Inspiration Behind Penhaligon's Unique Fragrance Tables.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_393.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">It was four years ago that the greatest show on earth came to London. The 22nd July marked the day of our incredible opening ceremony of the 2012 London Olympic Games. An incredible four hours of artistic display represented Britain&#39;s Green and pleasant Land, Industrial Revolution, literary heritage, popular music and culture. And who can forget the nod to our treasured National Health Service and Great Ormond Street Hospital. And of course the cameo appearance from Her Majesty the Queen!&nbsp;And there was the Olympic Cauldron. A stunning work of art by British designer Thomas Heatherwic.<br /> <br /> The 204 long elegant stems gracefully rose and converged to form a great flame - a symbol of the coming together of 204 nations.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/Fragrance_Table_Details4X5A1997.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px; font-size: 16px;" /></span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Well, did you know that our very own fragrance tables were inspired by Heatherwic&#39;s cauldron? Our own little masterpieces. Every Penhaligon&rsquo;s store today has a fragrance profiling table as a centre piece showcasing our 34 scents and connecting them as the entire Penhaligon&#39;s collection.</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/3.PNG" style="width: 500px; height: 481px;" /></span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/2.PNG" style="width: 500px; height: 447px;" /></span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">Have you seen one yet? They take pride of place in the <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=248">Canary Wharf </a>store or our soon to be re-opened flagship store on<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storedetail/?sid=145"> Regent Street. </a>Or if you&#39;re over the pond then all our new <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/page/storelocator/?validate=0&amp;longitude=0&amp;lattitude=0&amp;dummyInput=&amp;countryChoice=US&amp;sl_postcode=">US stores</a> feature them.<br /> <br /> Why not come and visit and try our delightful fragrances too!</span><br /> <div> &nbsp;</div> </div> <br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 Trade Routes - Lothair http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-lothair/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-lothair/#comments Tues, 02 Aug 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/trade-routes-lothair/ We continue our Trade Routes series finding out about the rich and luxurious goods that sailed into London, inspiring Lothair We continue our Trade Routes series finding out about the rich and luxurious goods that sailed into London, inspiring Lothair<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_390.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size: 14px;">England has enjoyed a long-term love affair with India. Since the first tentative steps onto this sub-continent, the colours, spices and scents have intoxicated us. It was so different and far-removed from the conservative, parochial world left back in Old Blighty. The entire nation slowly became hooked and India started leaving its indelible mark on our lives and in our hearts. Here the inspiration of India is palpable within <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Lothair</strong></u></a>, a delightful fragrance from one of Penhaligon&rsquo;s great perfumers.<br /> <br /> The long journeys to and from the subcontinent inspired two very definite English drinks, gin &amp; tonic and tea. These have united in <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/lothair-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Lothair</strong></u></a>. This delightful fragrance begins life on the open seas with a salty infusion of juniper, cardamom and grapefruit, classic botanicals of gin. Lothair first takes on the subtle hints of gin, the quintessential thirst quencher created on the long journey to this far-flung part of the British Empire. A little piece of Great Britain was to be found in the very un-British climate and backdrop of India. The aroma of crushed juniper berries are emboldened by grapefruit and bergamot that add a lively gin/tonic top note.<br /> It is as fresh as sea air and as clear as a ship&rsquo;s bell but as the notes settle a new aroma is ascending &ndash; tea.<br /> <br /> Little by little the black tea takes hold and the journey continues hand in hand with the bergamot releasing Earl Grey. This marks the start of the return journey where the streamlined clippers shipped tea back to London as quickly as possible. The delights of the plantations in Darjeeling and Assam were picked in delicate haste, packed up and sent to the major ports including Bombay. Once aboard the clippers it was all speed ahead to Europe as the first leaves to reach Bristol and London were sold at premium prices. There was no second place. Your fortunes were made or lost on how fast your ship negotiated the seas back home. The Cutty Sark was the fastest clipper in the world and no one could match the speed at which she brought her cargo home. From the moment the tea was packed on board, it was down to the captain to get his precious cargo back to England safely and quickly.<br /> <br /> The true value of the cargo is realized as it hits East India Docks in London. Opened in 1802, the annual value of tea coming through this dock was &pound;30m a year. A staggering amount at this time. Tea had to be treated as a precious commodity, something we need to contemplate as we grab our teabags to make a brew. The English East India Company created stunning warehouses in the East End; these were as secure as any prison. You can still see these warehouses in New Street opposite Liverpool Street station and through into the covered area of Devonshire Square. These beautiful buildings date from 1820 and are now offices, retail and luxury housing. It is amazing that they are still in tact after WWII and the zealous rebuilding dream of the London County Council.<br /> <br /> As the journey comes to a conclusion, the tea is unloaded and the vessels sit empty and forlorn amongst the docks of London&rsquo;s historic port. The smell of tea subsides and the notes of smaller cargoes of musk and vanilla come to the fore. These sweet notes mingle with the drydown of wenge, cedarwood and oakmoss reminiscent of the smell of the ship&rsquo;s timbers as they relax after a long voyage at sea.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 The Secret History of Guinness http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/#comments Thurs, 28 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/the-secret-history-of-guinness/ Did you know...Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness. Did you know...Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_367.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Here we are continuing our journey through the tastes of London...<br /> <br /> Guinness is one of the world&rsquo;s most famous brands; Porter is not. Guinness&rsquo; popular advertising lures you in with the two-tone appeal of its black liquid and creamy head. Porter looks the same and tastes similar but is really only known to lovers of stout and artisanal brews. Guinness is as Irish as St Patrick&rsquo;s Day and Porter is as London as tube delays. Guinness is the big brother who leaves the bosom of his family and makes a rip-roaring success of his life while the rest of the family who all look alike and have the same upbringing never quite make it.<br /> <br /> Porter was brewed in London from the early 1700&rsquo;s and was the perfect drink for the labour intensive work of London&rsquo;s dock and market porters who needed the calories and the vitamins that were packed into each malty glass. It was an incredibly important drink. However, most people do not realise that Guinness was inspired by a trip to London in 1776 by brewer, Arthur Guinness. He probably enjoyed the drink in one of the many pubs around Smithfield&rsquo;s that became famous for serving an early morning pint of Porter with breakfast. There was even a local brewery in Chiswell Street that would have provided a steady stream of Porter to local hostelries. Arthur certainly had vision; he took the recipe back to Ireland and created a similar beverage.&nbsp; Porter&rsquo;s future was set, it would become one of the most famous beers no one has ever heard of!</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/L/PENHALIGONS103_B%26WLondon_095.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 333px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">While Guinness took off in Ireland, by the mid nineteenth century, the dark stouts started going out of fashion in London. People were becoming increasingly aware of contaminated water, fancied the clearer, golden beers that looked like they had been made out of pure spring water rather than the Thames finest filth! Porter&rsquo;s appeal was waning and stout&rsquo;s future was on a dark, slippery slope.<br /> <br /> But as with all things, our taste in beer keeps changing. We have always moved from light to dark beers and back again. With a lot of work by CAMRA (The campaign for real ale), the 1990&rsquo;s saw us turn our back on the ersatz lagers of the 70&rsquo;s and 80&rsquo;s and put us back on to bitter, ales, milds and stouts. Even Porter is making its way back into the mainstream in Fuller&rsquo;s pubs where you don&rsquo;t have to ask for it as if it were something embarrassing you needed from the chemist. Quality beers and independent breweries have made a come back. Porter will rise again!</span><br /> 0 Trade Routes - Halfeti http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-halfeti/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-halfeti/#comments Fri, 22 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/trade-routes-halfeti/ We discover the story and inspiration behind our exotic Trade Routes Halfeti fragrance We discover the story and inspiration behind our exotic Trade Routes Halfeti fragrance<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_389.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">The Turkish town of Halfeti is a wonderful mix of Byzantine, Armenian, Egyptian and Ottoman heritage and a town well versed to trading with the world. The Levant Company was set up to create a relationship with the Ottoman Empire bringing exotic goods to English society. From spices to soft leathers, cloth to coffee, heavy damasks to golden currants, this trading company had control of the most desirable commodities of this region. Our relationship grew, the Ottoman Empire was intoxicating and by the 19th century, London&rsquo;s aristocracy was in awe of this fading power. Great fortunes were to be made in the valuable raw silks and cottons that were considered more stylish than the home-grown silks of Soho and Spitalfields.<br /> <br /> Of all the commodities traded in and around the town of Halfeti, the most unusual was their black rose, the rarest of flowers, which originates from the nearby banks of the Euphrates. These roses bloom once a year and it is the combination of its terroir and the pH of the river that creates a rose of the darkest shade of red. This red develops into a soft black in the hot suns of the summer. The Halfeti black rose was most covetable especially to the gothic Victorians. The oil extracted from the rose petals forms the mid note of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Halfeti</strong></u></a> is used to dramatic and mysterious effect.<br /> <br /> The English obsession with the Orient continued; they loved the unusual skylines, dominated by domes and minarets, the grand kasbahs confusing to even the most intrepid explorers. These emporia were filled exotic sounds, sights and with delightful smoke and perfumes of which London couldn&rsquo;t get enough. The Levant traders or pashas negotiated the souks and brought out the best of the bazaar, the scents of the trade route and some rich observations of Turkish and Arabic culture.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/halfeti-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Halfeti&rsquo;s</strong></u></a> piquancy comes from such spice treasures as cardamom, nutmeg, cinnamon and saffron. These were often seen in colourful powdery mounds in the medinas throughout this exotic empire. This was not trade on a large scale; you didn&rsquo;t need much. A tiny pinch was all that was required to create a little oriental mysticism.<br /> <br /> The journey through the Persian Gulf continues with the fragrance relaxing into dusky patchouli en route to an alluring musky base of resins, oud and amber. The oud is at its most subtle mixed with the velvety softness of cedar and sandalwoods. These final notes are like watching glowing embers at the end of a wood fire or seeing the sun set on the Turkish coast as these precious cargoes head to England.<br /> <br /> As the ships made their way along the Thames Estuary, you could see the ports burst into activity; bristling with excitement at the anticipation of every shipment from Turkey. Spices were divvied up between chefs, cooks and fragrance-makers. Fabrics were hastily dropped off at dressmakers where seamstresses would fashion clothes in the Ottoman style. There was even competition between men and women over who commanded the plumes of feathers and turbans. English society could not get enough of the exotic goods of the Ottoman Empire.</span><br /> <br type="_moz" /> 0 The Fall and Rise of Chocolate http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/#comments Weds, 20 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/fall-and-rise-of-chocolate/ Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate’s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood – just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country. Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate’s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood – just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_383.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Britons tastes are changing, especially when it comes to chocolate. There has been a definite rise in demand for dark chocolate with a higher cocoa content. Just look at the gourmet chocolate shops that have become more popular in recent years including William Curley&rsquo;s exotic creations and bars of Rococo&rsquo;s Grenadian delicious darkness. When you think you are having a treat, in fact, you are eating the latest health food (when eaten in small quantities and when accompanied by other healthy, whole foods!) It is only the high cocoa chocolate without the milky sugary taste that gets the healthy thumbs up which is great for lovers of Green &amp; Blacks but not so good for Cadbury&rsquo;s Dairy Milk fans.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Life is a cycle and it seems that we have reached that point on chocolate&rsquo;s historical Ferris wheel where we have come back to chocolate being a healthy superfood &ndash; just as it was perceived when it first arrived in this country.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Europeans have always been enamoured of chocolate since it was first introduced from the New World in the late sixteenth century. It was expensive and became the drink of choice of noble families. In 1657, a Frenchman opened a chocolate house in an East End alley and Londoners started visiting. First of all, it was a slow trickle but after a series of pamphlets were written eschewing the health benefits of this beverage, London fell for it hook, line and sinker. At a time when we were not so taken with Gallic charm, he had us at &ldquo;aphrodisiac&rdquo;! Chocolate was certainly sold on the assumption that it would boost fertility and desire but also the more practical Brits also considered its other benefits. It would aid digestion, reverse ageing, and alleviate a cracking hangover; something many people still believe!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> London sold this drink through its network of coffee houses where milk was added to make it more palatable and cheaper. Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753), remembered in the eponymous street names in Knightsbridge and Chelsea, visited Jamaica and became obsessed with this bitter health drink. In true British form, the recipe was altered and sugar, eggs, milk, spices including cinnamon and vanilla were added which probably reduced the impact of the health benefits but when you consider how long Sir Hans lived, maybe there was still some truth in it!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Chocolate wasn&rsquo;t sold in bar form until 1847 when Joseph Fry mixed cocoa, cocoa powder and sugar to make a moldable paste. This was the start of its mass appeal. Cocoa has always been expensive and the English were very happy if there was less of the cocoa mass and more milk and sugar &ndash; we even celebrate this with an image of a &lsquo;glass and a half&rsquo; on one well known brand.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> The Queen&rsquo;s favourite chocolatier, holder of a Royal Warrant and London&rsquo;s oldest chocolate brand, Charbonnel et Walker has been creating a whole range of chocolates since 1875 and has been enjoying a renaissance especially since the Queen&rsquo;s 90<sup>th</sup> birthday. Some of their customers are attracted to the traditional and somewhat nostalgic chocolates including the English Rose and Violet truffles enrobed in dark chocolate. However, the English can never quite shake off their love of the sweet confection as their recent best seller is the pink Marc de Champagne truffle &ndash; pale pink on the outside and about as far removed from a health food as you can get!<br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="Chocolate shop" src="/images/categories/PENHALIGONS102_LittleKnownLondon_182.jpg" style="width: 550px; height: 366px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">To muse more about our taste in chocolate, go to Sloane Square and walk along the King&rsquo;s Road, taking a detour to The Chelsea Physic Garden. This botanical garden, opened in 1673 was built on land donated by Sir Hans Sloane, the man who popularised milk chocolate. When you have had chance to think everything that has happened to the humble chocolate bar, pop into Rococo&rsquo;s first shop on The King&rsquo;s Road for a taste of the real Mckoy.</span><br /> &nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;<br /> 0 Trade Routes - As Sawira http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/#comments Fri, 15 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/trade-routes-about-as-sawira/ As Sawira is as old as time but as modern as today. As Sawira is as old as time but as modern as today.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_388.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><br /> <u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a> is as old as time but as modern as today. The sense of eternity, of continuity where old world meets new is apparent from the first inhalation. As the bottle is opened, the freshness of bergamot and saffron are released. Hints of the sea wake up the senses and before the bitter herbal notes of absinthe and davana take hold like a Moroccan dawn.<br /> <br /> Essaouira (also known as As Sawira) is Morocco&rsquo;s principal port. Nestled on the Atlantic coast, it is a short journey from the souks of Marrakesh. This has been a favourite trading post of Europeans including the English since the late Middle Ages. The scene has changed little over the past few hundred years. The fishermen with their dawn catch are still followed by seabirds ready to fight over a dropped fish or two. Both locals and visitors queue to get a taste of the simple sardines that are grilled on the quayside. Through the smoke and the bustle of the harbour, you can see dockworkers loading and unloading roughly packaged boxes belying the exotic contents that lie within. Inbound curios arrive from Timbuktu and beyond, spices arrive by caravan from the East. These collide on the piers, ready to be packed up and sent off to the lovers of all things Oriental.<br /> <br /> <u><strong><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/">As Sawira</a></strong></u> intensifies like the rising sun, opening the tones of roses, carnations and jasmine. This burst of flora emboldened by clove and cardamom is sunny and virile. As the sun continues to rise in the sky, work slows down on the quayside as the men keep out of the heat in the shade. Amber and resin are the shadow notes of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a>; fixing the warmth as the intensity shifts to an element of spice. &nbsp;<br /> <br /> Cloves and cardamom travelled the long desert trails into the arms of waiting Europeans ready to ship off to the wealthiest of clients. To the English, the trials of the caravan were romantic and heroic and stories were told that have added to the Middle Eastern mystique. As much as Europe loved spice, the world loved amber with traders earning great fortunes from these stones. The warmth and tactile qualities of the resin has given amber an elevated mystical status. No two pieces are ever the same and the link with pre-history has captured the imagination.<br /> <br /> As the sun plunges into the horizon and the trade wind strengthen, the warmth of <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/as-sawira-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>As Sawira</strong></u></a> takes a more sensual turn. This is a time for lovers; musk and oud are amplified with every heartbeat. Sylvan notes of gaiacwood, sandalwood and cedarwood collude with patchouli and vanilla in a passionate embrace. These were new experiences for the English nose, adding fire to warm the cool Victorian sensibilities, to add ardour and zeal to the imagination when talk of such fervour wasn&rsquo;t allowed. This was a personal tale of passion, a clandestine love story that started in the deserts of North Africa and culminated in the boudoirs of the aristocracy.</span><br /> 0 The Warehouse of the World http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/#comments Mon, 11 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Erin /blog/the-warehouse-of-the-world/ Penhaligon’s perfumers seem to have walked the historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London. Penhaligon’s perfumers seem to have walked the historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_387.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">A Victorian wandering around the docks and ports of London would first notice the hubbub and the sheer number of people working; a clamorous throng of porters, Lascars, carters, clerks, children and lingering ladies all negotiating, hauling, packing, unpacking, lifting, loading, talking, arguing and laughing. They would then start to perceive the aromas that changed with each arriving ship; from inky indigo to dusty coal, heady wines to smoky tea. The creaking of the ships gave little away as to the prizes held within. The more precious cargoes would have been docked at St Katherine&rsquo;s dock, closest to the City of London and in view of the Tower of London. Almost everything of value would have been docked here, brought in by the winds of trade. The fortunes of many relied on them, everyone hoping for the fruitful South Westerlies and dreading winds from the East that would hamper the arrival of the long-awaited ships.<br /> <br /> Substantial shipments of shells, sugar, ostrich feathers, dried fruit, herbs and spices were dwarfed by imports of baled wool, which were held in 32 acres of warehousing. This was the last leg of a journey of this raw material before it was sent North to England&rsquo;s weaving districts. Each year, 32,000 tonnes of tea arrived from China, India and Ceylon. The air never quite settling from the dust generated as the leaves were sorted and repackaged ready to send to the thirsty households of London and England.<br /> <br /> As London&rsquo;s role as the world&rsquo;s most important port was confirmed, a new series of enclosed docks emerged, protected from the river pirates and thieves who kept an eye on new cargoes arriving each day. The first was West India Quay with its high grey brick walls reminiscent of a fortress, keeping undesirables far from the warehouses full of Caribbean delights. The most important were sugar, dark and delicious molasses and sweet, warming rums, as dark as treacle but dangerously intoxicating. These highly desirable comestibles were guarded from those who knew their value. England couldn&rsquo;t get enough of the West Indies and their seductive selection of packaged and bottled sunshine.<br /> <br /> The warehousing and port grew and extended East consuming hovels and slums in its wake and opening up London more and more. Work and wealth came hand in hand with this expansion and the power and importance of London could not be questioned.<br /> <br /> Through all the high volume merchandise, the romance of trade was still tangible. The ships held secrets and stories of their time in the ports of the world and on the high seas. Exotic vanilla and cocoa from the Caribbean, carpets from Persia, rose oil from Turkey, batches of peppercorns, cardamoms and cloves from the East Indies mingling and colluding with the West. The docks would have welcomed flowers from all over the world, carnations, rose, jasmine, lavender and violets were greatly anticipated. Fruits including grapefruits, oranges, pomelos, figs and peaches were highly desirable and added to the melting pot of aromas that escaped the ships. Gentle hints of sandalwood, gaiacwood, cedarwoods and resins fought bravely to be noticed above the rougher tones of the ships timbers.<br /> <br /> Take a walk through the old docklands of East and South East London and enjoy the history of the Trade winds in their building and street names; The Cardamom Building, Cinnamon Wharf, Tobacco Dock, Vanilla and Sesame Court are just a tiny pinch of spice names that evoke a bygone era.<br /> <br /> Penhaligon&rsquo;s perfumers seem to have walked this historic route and created a story of fragrances that started with the Trade Routes and ended with the historic docks and warehouses of London.</span><br /> 0 Our oldest street food? http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/oysters/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/oysters/#comments Mon, 11 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/oysters/ The Penhaligon’s Times is exploring taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad.. The Penhaligon’s Times is exploring taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad..<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_369.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;"><span>The Penhaligon&rsquo;s Times explores taste and smell; London has some distinctive ones and they are not all bad. In fact, there are some wonderful aromas to enjoy; food markets, intoxicating juniper-infused gin distilleries, cheese shops, rose gardens and a few shocks in the hot houses at Kew or in the flower beds of the Chelsea Physic Garden. So walk into a cheese shop and sample something new, visit one of London&rsquo;s famed oyster stalls and indulge in a Roman-London favourite or sip on a pint of Guinness and wonder at the origins of this most Irish of drinks &ndash; you may be in for a stout surprise!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> This series begins with five pieces on the tastes of London and our oldest street food.</span><br /> <br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">Walk along the river Thames at low tide and you will spot them; archaeologists who dig under London can&rsquo;t avoid them &ndash; oyster shells. These simple discarded carapaces have given historians a big clue about the average Londoner&rsquo;s diet through the ages.<br /> <br /> <br /> The English and, in particular, Londoners have enjoyed eating oysters for nearly 2,000 years and have the Romans to thank for the introduction. In fact, these invaders loved English oysters so much, that they would pack them in ice and send them back to Rome as a delicacy.<br /> <br /> It is probably no coincidence that the Romans made their capital city, Camulodunum or modern day Colchester. The Colchester or nearby Mersea oysters are still considered some of the finest in the country if not the world. In fact, Richard Haward seventh generation oysterman from West Mersea has been providing Londoners with oysters and clams for many years. Every day, oysters are brought up to London, some go to the best restaurants and oyster bars but the vast majority land at Borough where oyster aficionados gather in an orderly queue.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Oysters" src="/images/blogs/Oyster_2.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 457px;" /><br /> <br /> If you mention oysters to some people, most would imagine the simple yet decadent meal of the Bright Young Things of the 1920&rsquo;s. They would quaff champagne and slurp on the oysters as if they were going out of fashion! Some people are reminded of Casanova whose libido seemed to benefit from the 50 oysters he ate everyday for breakfast. However, some may not know that up until the mid nineteenth century, London&rsquo;s poor would have eaten vast quantities of these bivalves from the Thames until the river became too polluted. The two World Wars that followed also impacted on the oyster as the beds were neglected when the beaches became off limits and boats were requisitioned for the war effort. This neglect impacted on the price and the more expensive the oyster, the more fashionable they became!<br /> <br /> <img alt="Oysters" src="/images/blogs/Oyster_3.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 430px;" /><br /> <br /> Nowadays, oysters are carefully harvested from the estuaries around the UK. If you wish to try delicious oysters at their source, venture to West Mersea, a small island off the coast of Essex and get there early to book your table at The Company Shed. You will be able to enjoy all manner of fruits of the sea but go from September to April to enjoy the plump, firm native oysters with their almost nutty taste. The native oyster is eaten during the months with an &lsquo;r&rsquo; in as these are the cooler months when they thrive. The other months give the oysters time to breed and rest. Natives are the indigenous oyster type and the rock is an introduced variety which can be eaten all year round.<br /> <br /> So, now, how do you enjoy an oyster? There aren&rsquo;t many people who have them for breakfast, but whether you eat them with bread and butter or with a glass of champagne, all you need is a squeeze of lemon juice or maybe a dash of shallot vinegar. Be sure to chew your oyster especially if you choose a size one, the largest oyster size available and a full meal in itself!</span></span><br /> <br /> <br /> 0 Little Known London - St Stephen Walbrook http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/st-stephen-walbrook/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/st-stephen-walbrook/#comments Tues, 05 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/st-stephen-walbrook/ For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise... For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_371.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">Of all the Wren churches in London, this is my favourite. If churches were a selection of cakes, this would be the Fondant Fancy, a small, light, pastel gem that is easy to miss as you wander around the City. You really need to ensure that you step back from this church to admire it. It is easy to miss its best asset if you stand too close. It has the most darling of domes &ndash; a small, perfectly formed verdigris cupola. The walls are high and fortress-like with high oval windows that provide both privacy and security.<br /> <br /> The church nestles behind Mansion House and would have been next to one of the lost rivers of London, the Walbrook. This subterranean stream starts in Shoreditch and enters the Thames near Cannon Street. The tiny churchyard feels dominated by the nearby modern offices but at least you can enjoy the reflections of the church in the glass edifice of the Rothschild&rsquo;s HQ. In the madness of London, this is surprisingly calm.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Once inside the church, the magic really begins. The first thing you notice is the light. Its interior is frosted perfection and as you walk in your eyes are automatically drawn to the sugar work dome supported by twelve Corinthian columns. Sir Christopher Wren created this church in a rectangle for a London congregation and to perfect the dome that would become the signature of St Paul&rsquo;s cathedral. It took 7 years to complete and was finished in 1679. The Second World War did little to damage this church.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="Garaways" src="/images/categories/698A9981.jpg" style="width: 402px; height: 489px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">In 1953, the rector of St Stephen Walbrook founded The Samaritan&rsquo;s as the world&#39;s first crisis hotline telephone support to those contemplating suicide. The old fashioned black telephone that was once used by the founder, Dr Chad Varah, is still there encased in Perspex as a reminder of such a good cause.</span><br /> <br /> <div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 14px;"><img alt="Cornhill" src="/images/categories/698A9985.jpg" style="width: 427px; height: 640px;" /></span></div> <br /> <span style="font-size: 14px;">However, the church, although small and very pretty, also courted controversy. In 1987, the same rector commissioned a Henry Moore altar. This is a rounded block of marble that sits in the very middle of the church with the dome above and the chairs placed in the round. It is theatrical but it has to be said you either love it or hate it.<br /> <br /> Sit for a while and enjoy the peace of the church. If you sit around the benches around the edge of the church, you will be sitting where the poorer members of the congregation sat rubbing their backs against the wooden panels and creating its unique patina. As you leave the church and walk away, look back and up to catch the final glimpse of the pale green dome, a rare sight in London that would have been dominated by towers and spires.</span><br /> 0 Little Known London http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/little-known-london/#comments Mon, 04 Jul 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Emma /blog/little-known-london/ The Penhaligon’s Times is running a new series on Little Known London. These blog pieces cover the secret bits of London; those hard to find little gems that makes London, London. The Penhaligon’s Times is running a new series on Little Known London. These blog pieces cover the secret bits of London; those hard to find little gems that makes London, London.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_373.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size: 16px;">When we think of London, we think of the impressive London that is on show when we switch on the television to see a Royal wedding or the state opening of parliament. The London of pomp and ceremony and who can forget London as the backdrop to the Olympics &ndash; what a backdrop!<br /> <br /> We may have seen London from the top of a tour bus or whisking through in a cab. Some have flown over and seen the Thames snaking through the landscape creating a watery divide that we barely even notice on the ground. London is regal, grand, dramatic and noble, and we love the theatre and the colour and the sheer history of the place. This is an ancient city that is ageing with great style and grace. It is also a city with secrets. It has some pretty weird, quirky and just plain curious things to see but you have to look, you have to seek them out. &nbsp;<br /> <br /> For every main street filled with bustling people and bristling with energy, there are little side streets and alleyways, off the proverbial beaten track and away from the clamour and the noise. We have all heard people saying that we need to look up in London; this is so true but to really get to know this city, you also need to question things. Why is this green space here, where does this alleyway lead and what are do those marks or details mean? Dig a little bit deeper and you can find out how London really ticks and the secrets that add dimension and beauty to this great city.<br /> <br /> The little known places that have been chosen are some of the most interesting places or details in London. They range from churches with secrets, a true London village, parks that are not quite what they seem, beautiful unknown houses, world firsts and some tiny, hard to spot details.<br /> <br /> Keep your eyes peeled for these treasures on the blog and on the streets.<br /> <br /> Coming soon...</span><br /> <br /> 0 Greenwich Observatory with Monalogue Blog http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/#comments Mon, 06 Jun 2016 00:00:00 GMT Guest - Ramona /blog/greenwich-observatory-with-monologue-blog/ Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on... Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on...<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_372.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Following on from her review of our Scent Profiling experience, Ramona from Monalogue blog went and explored Greenwich Observatory for us, here is how she got on...<br /> <br /> <em>You may remember that a few months ago I paid a visit to Penhaligon&rsquo;s London for a <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/fragrance-profiling-review-by-monalogue-blog/"><u><strong>fragrance profiling session</strong></u></a>. Since then, Penhaligon&rsquo;s have released a new fragrance, <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>. Luna is floral and feminine, and inspired by the light of the crescent moon. To celebrate the launch of their new fragrance, Penhaligon&rsquo;s sent myself and the wonderful Kym Grimshaw away to Greenwich Observatory, London.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Greenwich Observatory<br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich.jpg" /></strong><br /> <br /> Because there were so many things we wanted to see whilst in London, the day involved 14 glorious miles of walking. We hardly scraped the surface of what Greenwich has to offer, let alone central London itself. Greenwich Observatory is situated on the highest point in Greenwich Park. It&rsquo;s known for its roles in astronomy, navigation, and (of course) Greenwich Mean Time. The modern Prime Meridian is based at the observatory, so you can stand between the East and West hemispheres of the world.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_large_inside.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich1.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> Beyond these points, the observatory is an enchanting 17th century build. Back in the day, it cost &pound;520 to build, which was &pound;20 over budget! Inside you can find telescopes, navigational equipment and timepieces of all shapes, ages and sizes.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Old Royal Naval College<br /> <br /> <img alt="Observatory at Greenwich, London" src="/images/blogs/372_large_greenwich.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Royal Observatory" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich2.jpg" /></strong><br /> <br /> It would have been a wasted opportunity to not explore the other attractions in Greenwich. The Old Royal Naval College is the architectural centerpiece of Maritime Greenwich. The buildings are Grade I listed. They are so spectacular that it was virtually impossible to do them justice with a photograph. Nevertheless, I took many!<br /> &nbsp;<br /> Within the Royal Naval College is the Painted Hall, also known as &lsquo;the Sistine Chapel of the UK&rsquo;. It&rsquo;s easy to understand why when you see it. My standard travel blog posts are characterised by paragraphs of waffle. In this case there are no words adequate enough for description, or at least I can&rsquo;t come up with any. Have a look:<br /> &nbsp;<br /> <img alt="Painted Hall Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_large_observatory.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Greenwich" src="/images/blogs/372_greenwich3.jpg" /><br /> <br /> We must have spent about hald an hour trying to take photos of the roof using the mirros in the painted hall.<br /> <br /> <strong>Blackheath</strong><br /> <br /> Our visit to Blackheath is probably where we racked up the most miles on our pedometers. We crossed from Greenwich territory into the Borough of Lewisham in search of pretty doortraits. We got so carried away that we had to get a bus back to Greenwich in search of food. If I could live anywhere in London, Blackheath would be a strong contender.<br /> &nbsp;<br /> On route we stopped at the Ranger&rsquo;s House in Greenwich Park, which was full of squirrels and pretty roses.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Blackheath" src="/images/blogs/372_large_blackheath.jpg" /><br /> <br /> <img alt="Blackheath, London" src="/images/blogs/372_london2.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> <strong>Central London</strong><br /> <br /> There were still a few things on my London checklist, so after grabbing a nutritious vegan lasagne in Greenwich market, we hopped on the tube towards the centre. We called in to Daunt Books in Marylebone High Street, and had a nosy at the nearby and Instagram-famous Warren Mews.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Central London" src="/images/blogs/372_london.jpg" /><br /> &nbsp;<br /> We also managed to squeeze in a quick tour of Chelsea. Although I&rsquo;ve been to Chelsea a number of times, I&rsquo;ve never seen it during the RHS Chelsea Flower Show. Many of the shops were extensively (and I&rsquo;m not exaggerating) adorned with blooms and bouquets.<br /> <br /> <img alt="Central London, Chelsea" src="/images/blogs/372_blackheath.jpg" /><br /> And that concludes a day full of pretty London things, courtesy of Penhaligon&rsquo;s London. Once again I&rsquo;d like to thank them for a beautiful day and a beautiful fragrance.</em></span><br /> <br /> <br /> To read more from the lovely Ramona you can find her blog <u><strong><a href="http://www.monalogue.co.uk/2016/03/14/penhaligons-london-fragrance-profiling-afternoon/">here</a></strong></u>.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> <br /> <to blog="" can="" find="" from="" her="" lovely="" more="" ramona="" read="" the="" u="" you=""><em>&nbsp;</em></to><br /> 0 Hidden London: Royal Academy http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/#comments Thurs, 19 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex /blog/hidden-london-royal-academy/ Next in our Hidden London series is the Royal Academy, not exacly hidden but a gem you may have walked past as opposed to exploring inside. Next in our Hidden London series is the Royal Academy, not exacly hidden but a gem you may have walked past as opposed to exploring inside.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_347.jpg"<br/><br/><span style="font-size:16px;"><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/PEN_hiddenlondon_banner.jpg" style="width: 618px; height: 107px;" /><br /> The Royal Academy sits right in the heart of William Penhaligon&#39;s London on Picadilly, there is no doubt he would have walked by it many times as the first Penhaligon&#39;s shop was just round the corner in St James. A beautiful building and great place to sit and have a coffee but even more of a joy to explore the exhibitions that go on there. Famous for it&#39;s Summer Exhibition and the many notable artists that have graced it&#39;s walls for centuries as well as the general public who can submit their work for consideration and possible inclusion in the exhibition, it&#39;s a diverse and colourful spectacular with art displayed from the floor to the ceiling.<br /> <br /> The Royal Academy is different from most art galleries as it is led by artists (know as Royal Academians) and focuses not only on the exhibition of art but also of it&#39;s practise. It was the first Art School in Britain and still offers a post-graduate course, that is free to study but one of the most competitive in the country to secure a place on.<br /> <br /> The 248th Summer Exhibition opens to the public in early June. The world&rsquo;s largest open submission exhibition, provides a unique platform for emerging and established artists and architects to showcase their recent work to an international audience. It&#39;s well worth a visit.<br /> <br /> Our Burlington Arcade boutique is right next door to the Academy so come and say hello!</span><br /> <br /> <br /> 0 Penhaligon's x Saks Fifth Avenue: The Secret Garden http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/#comments Fri, 13 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Alex /blog/penhaligons-x-saks-fifth-avenue-the-secret-garden/ To celebrate the Saks Glam Gardens 2016 event, Penhaligon's Equinox Bloom is featured in a stunning window display as part of the Secret Garden Spring campaign on Fifth Avenue, NYC. To celebrate the Saks Glam Gardens 2016 event, Penhaligon's Equinox Bloom is featured in a stunning window display as part of the Secret Garden Spring campaign on Fifth Avenue, NYC.<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_366.jpg"<br/><br/><br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">This Spring we have been featured in the new campaign Glam Gardens 2016: The Secret Garden at Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City. <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Equinox Bloom</strong></u></a> takes centre stage in one of the stunning windows inspired by High Tea and Spring Blooms.<br /> <br /> &ldquo;Saks Fifth Avenue is embracing the spirit of Spring with The Secret Garden&mdash;a true homage to Mother Nature filled with splendor and the revitalizing theater of the garden.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/equinox-bloom-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Equinox Bloom</strong></u></a> was the perfect choice for the window as it too was inspired by the sweet treats of tea and fragrant floral notes of Jasmine and Orange Blossom.<br /> <br /> If you are visiting NYC and see the windows, don&#39;t forget to tweet us a pic or tag us on instagram!<br /> <br /> <em>Saks Fifth Avenue, 12 East 49th Street New York until May 24th 2016.</em></span><br /> <br /> 0 An Eternal Slumber http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-eternal-slumber/ http://www.penhaligons.com/blog/an-eternal-slumber/#comments Tues, 03 May 2016 00:00:00 GMT Nick /blog/an-eternal-slumber/ The myth of Endymion has been told in many different ways… The myth of Endymion has been told in many different ways…<br/><br/><img alt="" src="/images/blogs/blog_large_363.jpg"<br/><br/><div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Dating back as far as the 6th Century BC, the tale of Endymion is an Ancient Greek myth that acted as inspiration for our modern classic fragrance &ndash; recently reimagined in a more powerful Eau de Parfum as <a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/endymion-concentre-eau-de-parfum/"><u><strong>Endymion Concentr&eacute;</strong></u></a> &ndash; and finally meeting his love,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/" style="font-size: 14px;"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">A handsome young shepherd, without comparison throughout all of Ancient Greece, Endymion would tend his flock in the hills of Elis, and was said to be the first mortal to observe the movement of the moon.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;"><a href="http://www.penhaligons.com/luna-eau-de-toilette/"><u><strong>Luna</strong></u></a>, the moon goddess, drove her chariot across the heavens every night drawn by snow-white, long-maned horses, taking with her the light of the moon.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Every night, she would gaze upon the beauty of the shepherd Endymion. Filled with longing, Luna pleaded with Zeus for the right to his son. Endymion fell in love with Luna as she crossed the skies.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:16px;">Zeus eventually conceded to Luna, permitting her to place Endymion into an eternal slumber. In his state of permanent sleep, he would remain ageless and deathless - and his beauty would be preserved.</span></div> <div> <span style="font-size:16px;">From then on, Luna visited Endymion every night in his slumber&hellip;</span></div> <div> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">NB:&nbsp;</span><br /> &nbsp;</div> <div> <span style="font-size:14px;">The story of Endymion, like most stories in ancient mythology, is often contested by scholars, having been retold by various poets throughout history and translated into several versions.</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Endymion, was said to be the son of Zeus, king of the gods, and Calyce, a mortal woman. By most accounts, Endymion was a shepherd, but in others he was King of Elis &ndash; or son of the king, rather than Zeus.&nbsp;</span></div> <div> <br /> <span style="font-size:14px;">Luna was a Titan goddess, the personification of the moon. In various versions of the myth, she also goes by Selene. Titan was also the Roman counterpart to Selene throughout several. Diana was the counterpart to Artemis, and in later Roman beliefs was also cognate to Selene as the moon goddess.</span></div> 0